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DESIGN PORTFOLIO
TAMARA MITCHELL
EFFORT/REWARD: GOOD EXAMPLE
 This business card is low effort and high reward. At one
glance the reader easily locate the...
EFFORT/REWARD: GOOD EXAMPLE
 This map is high effort and high reward.
There is a lot of detail on the map, but it is
well...
EFFORT/REWARD: GOOD EXAMPLE
 This magazine is high effort and high
reward.There is a lot of information on
this page, but...
EFFORT/REWARD: BAD EXAMPLE
 This sign is high effort/low reward. It
is difficult to read because it relies
entirely on te...
EFFORT/REWARD: BAD EXAMPLE
 This magazine layout is high effort and low
reward.The text is too close together to make it
...
THEME: GOOD EXAMPLE
 The theme of a dairy is communicated
through color choice.
 The twine is an element induces
histori...
THEME: GOOD EXAMPLE
 The title “Fish Fry” is the largest text
making it one of the first things an
audience sees on the p...
THEME: BAD EXAMPLE
 Using more than two fonts doesn’t reinforce the tone
communicated through fonts.
 The flyer is a jum...
THEME: BAD EXAMPLE
 The theme is professional website
design for businesses, but the color
swatches and pencils make the ...
PICTUREVERBS/CONCRETE NOUNS: GOOD EXAMPLE
 The theme of the sign implies that women
shop and men are the target audience ...
PICTUREVERBS/CONCRETE NOUNS: GOOD EXAMPLE
 The picture verbs and concrete nouns
highlight a single exhibit in the museum....
PICTUREVERBS/CONCRETE NOUNS: GOOD EXAMPLE
 Picture verbs and concrete nouns enhance the images on the
bottles instead of ...
PICTUREVERBS/CONCRETE NOUNS : BAD EXAMPLE
 Since “gifts” is a vague term,
repeating it is ineffective. Concrete
words to ...
PICTUREVERBS/CONCRETE NOUNS : BAD EXAMPLE
 Pointy pencils coupled with the
concrete noun “Eye” doesn’t
convey webpage des...
AUDIENCE: GOOD EXAMPLE
 The design is simple, but professional.
 The shape of Oregon is used to highlight the
action-ori...
AUDIENCE: GOOD EXAMPLE
 The sign is targeting Oregon State University
Students.This logo implies that the club is fun and...
AUDIENCE: BAD EXAMPLE
 Although the marketing needs to target
business professionals, the colored pencils
against a rando...
AUDIENCE: BAD EXAMPLE
 The audience for this advertisement is
parents who purchase ORAcle books for
children; yet, the pi...
VISUAL CONTEXT: GOOD EXAMPLE
 This picture is easy to understand at a
glance. Since this is a children’s museum, a
pictur...
VISUAL CONTEXT: GOOD EXAMPLE
 The picture on the billboard shows the
results of a theft and is relevant to
the topic at h...
VISUAL CONTEXT: GOOD EXAMPLE
 The relation of the background image
to the magazine is strong. Not only is
this an entrepr...
VISUAL CONTEXT: BAD EXAMPLE
 Giving an example of the survey
topics and fake answers instead of
using an image makes the
...
VISUAL CONTEXT: BAD EXAMPLE
 Although the images and shapes are connected to the
message in some way, the excessive use o...
EMBELLISHMENT/ENHANCEMENT/EMBODIMENT: GOOD EXAMPLE
 The message of the sign is enhanced
by showing the types of crops tha...
EMBELLISHMENT/ENHANCEMENT/EMBODIMENT: GOOD EXAMPLE
 The magazine cover contains a
rendering of what the Big Bang
Theory c...
EMBELLISHMENT/ENHANCEMENT/EMBODIMENT: GOOD EXAMPLE
 This sign visually communicates
the directions given through the
word...
EMBELLISHMENT/ENHANCEMENT/EMBODIMENT: GOOD EXAMPLE
 The scientific table of elements is
imitated in the middle of the sig...
EMBELLISHMENT/ENHANCEMENT/EMBODIMENT: BAD EXAMPLE
 Although the art has for separate
ends, it is difficult to surmise
whe...
EMBELLISHMENT/ENHANCEMENT/EMBODIMENT: BAD EXAMPLE
 The purpose of pink ribbons is to raise awareness for
breast cancer.Tu...
EMBELLISHMENT/ENHANCEMENT/EMBODIMENT: BAD EXAMPLE
 The image of the tree is
unnecessary embellishment
because it doesn’t ...
PROXIMITY: GOOD EXAMPLE
 The “S” connects the “OSU” to the
video game controller to reinforce the
message.
 The Latin wo...
PROXIMITY: GOOD EXAMPLE
 The title text is easy to read because it
is centered and grouped close
together.
 The words re...
PROXIMITY: BAD EXAMPLE
 Placing the image of the beaver at
the top of the sign is problematic
because the sign does not d...
PROXIMITY: BAD EXAMPLE
 This flyer appears to be
disorganized and difficult to read
because elements are randomly
placed ...
ALIGNMENT: GOOD EXAMPLE
 The title text is highlighted by
placing it at the top and centering
it.
 The sections relating...
ALIGNMENT: GOOD EXAMPLE
 This sign is visually interesting
because the three words are aligned
according to the rule of t...
ALIGNMENT: BAD EXAMPLE
 The title text is too close to the top of the
page. It should either be centered on the
page or l...
ALIGNMENT: BAD EXAMPLE
 This sign is difficult to read because it
mixes center alignment with
right alignment.
 Center a...
REPETITION: GOOD EXAMPLE
 The sign repeats the name of the
attorney through the visual of the
scales.The visual is carefu...
REPETITION: GOOD EXAMPLE
 The colors of the beans are repeated
throughout the multi-colored words
“The” and “Vegan” – Thi...
REPETITION: BAD EXAMPLE
 The repetition of the red color isn’t
the best choice because it de-
emphasizes the rose. Using ...
REPETITION: BAD EXAMPLE
 It is clear that the sign is about elephants
and some sort of love because of the four
elephant ...
CONTRAST: GOOD EXAMPLE
 The word smoke embodies the
concept.This sign effectively
contrasts a smooth white texture
at the...
CONTRAST: GOOD EXAMPLE
 This sign uses contrasting color to
effectively communicate the restriction
on smoking.The immedi...
CONTRAST: BAD EXAMPLE
 The blood red background with a
red rose on top of it does not
emphasize the flower. Contrasting
t...
CONTRAST: BAD EXAMPLE
 This sign is difficult to read because
the smaller sections of text are gray
on a gray background....
COLOR: GOOD EXAMPLE
 The high contrast colors add interest to the
design.The colors also help reinforce the
core message ...
COLOR: GOOD EXAMPLE
 This Oregon State club follows brand
guidelines for color. For this reason, color
reinforces brand. ...
COLOR: BAD EXAMPLE
 This design doesn’t seem to communicate
sports.The colors selected aren’t’ traditionally
associated w...
COLOR: BAD EXAMPLE
 Although the triad color scheme is
attempted, the designer chooses to use
two variations of the yello...
STYLE: GOOD EXAMPLE
 This is a good example of font “traveling”
around the sign to reinforce the concept
of the Oregon tr...
STYLE: GOOD EXAMPLE
 This design works. High
contrasting colors (red and green,
and black and white) and textures
(smooth...
STYLE: BAD EXAMPLE
 This design does not communicate fun
& excitement.The image is
aesthetically pleasing, but the
landsc...
STYLE: BAD EXAMPLE
 The curled, uneven letters do not lend
the topic “Your Rights as aWorker” the
serious consideration t...
TYPE: GOOD EXAMPLE
 This button is well-designed.The large,
bold text emphasizes the call to action
“Vote.”The typeface w...
TYPE: GOOD EXAMPLE
 The font is eye catching - It looks like
it is exploding off of the page. Large,
red letters emphasiz...
TYPE: GOOD EXAMPLE
 The lowercase letters are understated and simple.Yet, the
rounded corners communicate and informality...
TYPE: BAD EXAMPLE
 The typography doesn’t match the mood of the
presentation topic. Using a no-nonsense font is
fine for ...
TYPE: BAD EXAMPLE
 Placing the letters within words and
between words equal distances apart
causes problems for this sign...
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Design portfolio

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Principles of design are explored through real-world example images.

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Design portfolio

  1. 1. DESIGN PORTFOLIO TAMARA MITCHELL
  2. 2. EFFORT/REWARD: GOOD EXAMPLE  This business card is low effort and high reward. At one glance the reader easily locate the main title and subtitle of the card.  The text is well-grouped, easy to find, and visually appealing.  There is plenty of whitespace around the text to make it legible.
  3. 3. EFFORT/REWARD: GOOD EXAMPLE  This map is high effort and high reward. There is a lot of detail on the map, but it is well-organized.  Pictures are directly connected to locations on the map.The principle of embodiment is reinforced through these pictures of actual places and animal life on the map.  Captions are used to further explain pictures.  Graphics are used to represent local places on the map and increase the visual appeal and communicate important information.
  4. 4. EFFORT/REWARD: GOOD EXAMPLE  This magazine is high effort and high reward.There is a lot of information on this page, but it is anchored to a center image that represents the core topic.  Smaller pictures are linked to regions on the center image to reinforce relevant subtopics.  Captions are structured with color and bolded text to highlight the most important information first.  There is plenty of whitespace on the page to make the information legible. v v v v v
  5. 5. EFFORT/REWARD: BAD EXAMPLE  This sign is high effort/low reward. It is difficult to read because it relies entirely on text that spans from top to bottom and left to right to communicate with the audience.  All text is given equal importance by making it relatively the same size. It is difficult to know where to look first.  There isn’t enough whitespace used to emphasize one area of text.
  6. 6. EFFORT/REWARD: BAD EXAMPLE  This magazine layout is high effort and low reward.The text is too close together to make it readable.  The image of text on a text-heavy page makes reading the article seem even more daunting.  The black and white images with black and white text only emphasize the business of the page.  Event thought this quote is in a section apart from the rest of the text, it is still lengthy and increases the amount of effort it would take to read the page.  There isn’t enough whitespace used between paragraphs and lines to emphasize one area of text.
  7. 7. THEME: GOOD EXAMPLE  The theme of a dairy is communicated through color choice.  The twine is an element induces historical nostalgia that reminds the audience of the “good ole days” and moves the reader from the business card to the green text.The business card, with a more modern feel, contrasts with the twine and communicates a modern resurgence of country-fresh farm products.  The earthy, brown packaging materials used in this advertisement reinforce the message of an “all natural” dairy.
  8. 8. THEME: GOOD EXAMPLE  The title “Fish Fry” is the largest text making it one of the first things an audience sees on the page.  A blue, white, and gray color scheme implies that the fish are fresh from the ocean.The darker blue color makes the center text look like its on a sign.  Simple fish graphics are swimming toward the sign and are repeated to reinforce the fish fry concept in a tasteful and professional manner.
  9. 9. THEME: BAD EXAMPLE  Using more than two fonts doesn’t reinforce the tone communicated through fonts.  The flyer is a jumble of fonts, colors, and images. It doesn’t effectively communicate one theme.  Although a photo of an elephant and heart images can be effective, the repetition of both is excessive and confusing to sift through.  A definite color theme hasn’t been selected.A variety of pinks, purples, blues, black, grays, reds lacks focus.  There is too much text on the flyer. Stronger words could be used to communicate theme.
  10. 10. THEME: BAD EXAMPLE  The theme is professional website design for businesses, but the color swatches and pencils make the design look like an interior design project.  The image of the website on devices is small, but should be the focus of the theme.  The words “EstablishYour Online Business” reinforce the theme, but they are smaller than “Eye Catching.”
  11. 11. PICTUREVERBS/CONCRETE NOUNS: GOOD EXAMPLE  The theme of the sign implies that women shop and men are the target audience that make purchases. Although this fact may be arguable, the words on the sign are effectively grouped next to pictures.  The sign plays off of the verb “into”; stating that each group is “into” something different, but implying that you should get “into” their furniture. Although the verb “into” isn’t used only in one visual way, using the verb in three contexts boosts its effectiveness.  The concrete nouns “leather” and “margin” effectively contrast two perspectives and are stronger than saying “chairs” and “money.”
  12. 12. PICTUREVERBS/CONCRETE NOUNS: GOOD EXAMPLE  The picture verbs and concrete nouns highlight a single exhibit in the museum. Since the museum is familiar to the area, it is okay to focus the message on the single exhibit to communicate excitement about new content at an established museum.  The concrete noun “Mastodon” is enlarged and extended across the billboard to show its size. It’s also a better word choice than “Woolly Mammoth” because one word produces better emphasis.  Vanishing is an effective picture verb highlighted even further through the choice of white text (absence of color) on the billboard..
  13. 13. PICTUREVERBS/CONCRETE NOUNS: GOOD EXAMPLE  Picture verbs and concrete nouns enhance the images on the bottles instead of supplement them. Actually, the words are placed on a clear bottle, directly on the oil itself to enhance the connection.  “Infused” is a picture verb that implies placing one item in another. This concept is shown through the bottle’s packaging - The oil that shows through the clear bottle paired with the image of the chili, lemon, or mint is connected through the word “infuse.”  “Olive Oil” labels the contents within each bottle. The words are paired with either “chili,” “lemon,” or “mint” to clarify the available oil choices.The terms are precise. v v v
  14. 14. PICTUREVERBS/CONCRETE NOUNS : BAD EXAMPLE  Since “gifts” is a vague term, repeating it is ineffective. Concrete words to represent gifts should be used.  Using the word flowers on top of pictures of flowers isn’t as effective as describing the impact of flowers through picture verbs. People buy flowers for people, not for flowers.
  15. 15. PICTUREVERBS/CONCRETE NOUNS : BAD EXAMPLE  Pointy pencils coupled with the concrete noun “Eye” doesn’t convey webpage design skills.  The red picture verb “Catching” is highlighted on the page and sits next to sharpened colored pencils, color swatches, and an image of electronic devices.These don’t seem to be tools to attract customers.
  16. 16. AUDIENCE: GOOD EXAMPLE  The design is simple, but professional.  The shape of Oregon is used to highlight the action-oriented word “go.”  The Oregon is moved toward the left edge of the page to indicate movement and action.  The color green highlights the word “go.”  This sign is for action-oriented business people.
  17. 17. AUDIENCE: GOOD EXAMPLE  The sign is targeting Oregon State University Students.This logo implies that the club is fun and professional. It uses the shade of orange used for Oregon State branding.  The image of the video game controller connected with the university title is fun and interesting. It’s appropriate for attracting gaming students.  The Latin words and laurel leaves carry a serious tone communicating that only those who are interested in the professional aspects of gaming should join.
  18. 18. AUDIENCE: BAD EXAMPLE  Although the marketing needs to target business professionals, the colored pencils against a random blue background seem to target artists or educators.  The largest, brightest image on the page is a set of colored pencils.This isn’t relevant to the topic of website design because it’s not recognized as a tool of website design. The computer and mobile device should be the focus.  Pairing the image of sharp colored pencils with the highlighted words “Eye Catching” seems more hazardous than helpful.This doesn’t engender trust with future professional clients. It doesn’t convey competency with web design.
  19. 19. AUDIENCE: BAD EXAMPLE  The audience for this advertisement is parents who purchase ORAcle books for children; yet, the picture shows a teenager, a different audience, reading the book.  The word “Your” could be removed because it targets the reader of the book instead of the parent who purchases the book.To target parents simply say “Get ORAcle” or “Get ORAcle Today.”  Since this particular book is more of a textbook, using the words “Engaging Reading” makes the product sound more like a magazine than an educational textbook.
  20. 20. VISUAL CONTEXT: GOOD EXAMPLE  This picture is easy to understand at a glance. Since this is a children’s museum, a picture of a child heightens visual context.  In this photo, museum is used as a verb (As in,“My child museums”).The child in the photo is actively experimenting.  The word reinvented is paired with an image of a child who is participating in a scientific experiment.The smile shows positive results, but the marks around the eyes indicate that everything is trial and error.  The red in the beaker matches the red in the OMSI title reinforcing OMSI as an a place children can experiment.
  21. 21. VISUAL CONTEXT: GOOD EXAMPLE  The picture on the billboard shows the results of a theft and is relevant to the topic at hand.  It looks like this particular picture matches the architecture of a local park. Similar trees and brick paths are part of this area in the city. The relevance of the message to the area is even clearer because of this.  The billboard is placed in the city where there is a high crime rate.Visuals in the environment are part of the overall message.
  22. 22. VISUAL CONTEXT: GOOD EXAMPLE  The relation of the background image to the magazine is strong. Not only is this an entrepreneur, there is an article about him in the issue.  The title of the article overlaps with the person highlighted in the article.  Visual context could be strengthened if the background included a picture of the entrepreneur in action, in his office or with his company instead of just sitting and smiling in a random chair.
  23. 23. VISUAL CONTEXT: BAD EXAMPLE  Giving an example of the survey topics and fake answers instead of using an image makes the advertisement text heavy.  The image of fake survey answers are also very negative.They do not add to the overall design or message.
  24. 24. VISUAL CONTEXT: BAD EXAMPLE  Although the images and shapes are connected to the message in some way, the excessive use of hearts and images of an elephant do not communicate as effectively as one centered image. In fact, it may be confusing for the audience to select which image is most important.  Images should be used to reinforce the message of the piece. Instead this poster uses a crown to reinforce the name of the elephant instead of the call to action or point of the poster.
  25. 25. EMBELLISHMENT/ENHANCEMENT/EMBODIMENT: GOOD EXAMPLE  The message of the sign is enhanced by showing the types of crops that grow in the area.  The visuals of crops play off of the words “A Place to Grow” and effectively enhance the message on the sign.
  26. 26. EMBELLISHMENT/ENHANCEMENT/EMBODIMENT: GOOD EXAMPLE  The magazine cover contains a rendering of what the Big Bang Theory could look like. By visually representing the central article in the magazine, the message is enhanced.
  27. 27. EMBELLISHMENT/ENHANCEMENT/EMBODIMENT: GOOD EXAMPLE  This sign visually communicates the directions given through the words on the sign.The image enhances the image by showing the consequences of an earthquake on the area around it.  This makes the sign accessible to individuals who speak different languages. For this reason, the sign may also be considered embodiment.
  28. 28. EMBELLISHMENT/ENHANCEMENT/EMBODIMENT: GOOD EXAMPLE  The scientific table of elements is imitated in the middle of the sign. Instead of adding information it is reduced to enhancement.  Instead, the table could be arranged visually showing elements of good design instead of trying to imitate scientific design.Although the current table is visually interesting, it’s not educationally effective. Good educational design should be both.
  29. 29. EMBELLISHMENT/ENHANCEMENT/EMBODIMENT: BAD EXAMPLE  Although the art has for separate ends, it is difficult to surmise whether or not the four-sided cross symbolize the “4 Daughters”.  This is an example of unnecessary embellishment.The message of the sign could be communicated without it.
  30. 30. EMBELLISHMENT/ENHANCEMENT/EMBODIMENT: BAD EXAMPLE  The purpose of pink ribbons is to raise awareness for breast cancer.Turning the ribbon into a pair of legs is a poor attempt at using a body part to reinforce the image women. Although attempted, this is not an enhancement of the message.  The pair of legs doesn’t enhance the message of raising awareness for breast cancer.  Instead, altering the ends of the ribbon to look like legs changes a powerful symbol into unnecessary embellishment.  The white lines curving around the outside of the sticker is another element of embellishment.
  31. 31. EMBELLISHMENT/ENHANCEMENT/EMBODIMENT: BAD EXAMPLE  The image of the tree is unnecessary embellishment because it doesn’t seem to reinforce the message of the advertisement.  Placing words inside the tree that relate to the theme of the poster do not help to make the image of the tree relevant.
  32. 32. PROXIMITY: GOOD EXAMPLE  The “S” connects the “OSU” to the video game controller to reinforce the message.  The Latin words are paired with the laurel leaves to create a border with the bottom text.  The laurel leaves lead up toward “OSU”. Grouping information and leading the audience to view different informational groups through placement of text and images is something that this sign demonstrates.
  33. 33. PROXIMITY: GOOD EXAMPLE  The title text is easy to read because it is centered and grouped close together.  The words reinforce the message of traveling a trail. Each word is slanted upwards in groups.  The word “The” is intended to be the beginning of the trail and is grouped with “Oregon”.  Arrows are placed before and after “Distillery to remind the audience of the type of trail.
  34. 34. PROXIMITY: BAD EXAMPLE  Placing the image of the beaver at the top of the sign is problematic because the sign does not discuss beavers.  Text could be divided into sections with subheaders to make it easier to read.
  35. 35. PROXIMITY: BAD EXAMPLE  This flyer appears to be disorganized and difficult to read because elements are randomly placed on the page below the title.  It would help to increase the whitespace by moving elements further apart.  Elements could be better grouped together in sections. For example, the information on the hearts could be gathered together.
  36. 36. ALIGNMENT: GOOD EXAMPLE  The title text is highlighted by placing it at the top and centering it.  The sections relating to content within the magazine are left aligned on different parts of the page.This reinforces the sub- themes relating to the central focus of the magazine.  A reader of this magazine would be able to quickly locate content because left alignment makes the text legible.
  37. 37. ALIGNMENT: GOOD EXAMPLE  This sign is visually interesting because the three words are aligned according to the rule of thirds on the vertical and horizontal areas of the page.  Each of the three words is sized to maintain consistent alignment on both sides of the text. Since the middle word is smaller it is emphasized through the use of a larger font.This type of alignment also helps the sign to look professional.
  38. 38. ALIGNMENT: BAD EXAMPLE  The title text is too close to the top of the page. It should either be centered on the page or left aligned with the text so it doesn’t seem to be floating off into space.  The alignment issues in this article make it overwhelming to read. One issue: this article doesn’t have enough spacing in between paragraphs and lines.  The text flows from the top of the page to the bottom of the page. The text should be aligned in a way that gives it more whitespace.  Another whitespace issue that could be fixed with better alignment:There is very little padding around the pictures. The center margins are too close together.
  39. 39. ALIGNMENT: BAD EXAMPLE  This sign is difficult to read because it mixes center alignment with right alignment.  Center alignment is especially confusing when trying to differentiate between the main header at the top and the example reviews below it.
  40. 40. REPETITION: GOOD EXAMPLE  The sign repeats the name of the attorney through the visual of the scales.The visual is carefully chosen. Although there are a variety of scales that could have been selected, the designer selects the scales of justice to reinforce the message that Donald L. Scales is a lawyer.  The office name and location is reinforced by using the same font. In this case, the repetition of font choice adds visual interest and improves legibility.
  41. 41. REPETITION: GOOD EXAMPLE  The colors of the beans are repeated throughout the multi-colored words “The” and “Vegan” – This is an effective way to link the food to the title.  The image is visually appealing because the type repeats colors in the image. The greens, mauves, and browns reinforce the “earthy” tone.The message that is conveyed is one of health through all- natural food.
  42. 42. REPETITION: BAD EXAMPLE  The repetition of the red color isn’t the best choice because it de- emphasizes the rose. Using a white background would help the rose to stand out.  The repetition of the rose shape in the alignment of the body text makes the text is difficult to read.  The repetition of the rose shape in the space between the rose and the body text also creates insufficient whitespace needed to emphasize one area of text.
  43. 43. REPETITION: BAD EXAMPLE  It is clear that the sign is about elephants and some sort of love because of the four elephant images and multiple hear images. Still, repeating hearts and elephants does not communicate a compelling reason to participate in the bake sell to help Prince. It is confusing to look at.  Although the central picture of the elephant is the most visually interesting, it isn’t necessary to repeat the image throughout the page to emphasize it’s equal importance.  Repeating hearts doesn’t help focus the audience on the most important message first.
  44. 44. CONTRAST: GOOD EXAMPLE  The word smoke embodies the concept.This sign effectively contrasts a smooth white texture at the bottom of the word “Smoke” with the dissipating text at the top of the word.  Contrasting black background and white text draws attention to the words and message.
  45. 45. CONTRAST: GOOD EXAMPLE  This sign uses contrasting color to effectively communicate the restriction on smoking.The immediate image of the black cigarette with the red line through it quickly communicates the central message through enhancement.  This sign is easy to read because the large title text contrasts with the smaller text.  Whitespace also contrasts with text to make the text stand out.  The contrasting colors, red and black, emphasize “Oregon’s Workplace Law” and connect it to a contrasting symbol for no.
  46. 46. CONTRAST: BAD EXAMPLE  The blood red background with a red rose on top of it does not emphasize the flower. Contrasting the flower with the background would better help to connect the sign with a floral shop.  There is a difference between intentionally using different objects and words for contrast, but the inconsistent use of the word “and” and “&” does not help with contrast.  There isn’t enough whitespace used to contrast the body text with the title text.
  47. 47. CONTRAST: BAD EXAMPLE  This sign is difficult to read because the smaller sections of text are gray on a gray background.  The section of white text presents particular legibility issues when it is placed against the white shirt of the background image. This is a problem because it communicates the purpose of the issue.
  48. 48. COLOR: GOOD EXAMPLE  The high contrast colors add interest to the design.The colors also help reinforce the core message of the piece. Black and white are used around the edges of the card and on the name “Oregon Dairy” and “Farm Fresh” and “Family Fun” and reinforce the idea of country-fresh farm products.  The market, restaurant, and gift shoppe are effectively connected to the rest of the design through the contrasting red and green colors. Repeating green in the grass and on the subtext emphasizes the home- grown products. Using red in the barn and on the words “The Market” again reinforces the idea of farm fresh.
  49. 49. COLOR: GOOD EXAMPLE  This Oregon State club follows brand guidelines for color. For this reason, color reinforces brand. So, in this instance, color connects the club to a larger organization.
  50. 50. COLOR: BAD EXAMPLE  This design doesn’t seem to communicate sports.The colors selected aren’t’ traditionally associated with sports.The colors are also excessively bright.
  51. 51. COLOR: BAD EXAMPLE  Although the triad color scheme is attempted, the designer chooses to use two variations of the yellow color.This makes the design seem busy and less organized.  There are also two variations of the red color.The different shades of red are more pronounced.This affects the message because it looks less visually appealing and organized.
  52. 52. STYLE: GOOD EXAMPLE  This is a good example of font “traveling” around the sign to reinforce the concept of the Oregon trail.The typeface is elegant, but bold.The makes the font legible.  The concept of the trail is further communicated by placing the sign on the surface of the trail.The border around the logos appears as a trail.
  53. 53. STYLE: GOOD EXAMPLE  This design works. High contrasting colors (red and green, and black and white) and textures (smooth wrapping, rough string, and a raised card) add visual interest and remind the viewer of common themes and materials from farm life. This helps communicate the authenticity and value of the all-natural farm products sold by the company. It also helps that the acutal gift card wrapping is displayed.  Round and arched shapes contrast the straight lines.The arched “The Market” repeats the rounded design of the cow spots and green grass lines and contrasts the straight lines of text.
  54. 54. STYLE: BAD EXAMPLE  This design does not communicate fun & excitement.The image is aesthetically pleasing, but the landscape image without cars and people makes the city look like a ghost town.  The text is plane, white, simple, and centered on the page. The designer could experiment with color, alignment, and proximity to make the words on the page more interesting.
  55. 55. STYLE: BAD EXAMPLE  The curled, uneven letters do not lend the topic “Your Rights as aWorker” the serious consideration that it deserves.  The bright colors and cartoonish shapes make the topic seem fun, but unimportant.There also doesn’t seem to be a foundation for the color choice.  I’m not sure what these shapes are or what they have to do with worker’s rights.
  56. 56. TYPE: GOOD EXAMPLE  This button is well-designed.The large, bold text emphasizes the call to action “Vote.”The typeface with thick, bold letters is easily read from short distances.  The sharp corners on the letters mirror the corners on the stars. Straight lines, and no-nonsense edges are on the font and stars shapes are an effective way to reinforce the them of the button through typography.
  57. 57. TYPE: GOOD EXAMPLE  The font is eye catching - It looks like it is exploding off of the page. Large, red letters emphasize the feeling of movement by placing weight on the vertical part of the typeface and lengthening the horizontal marks on each letter.  The message is emphasized through contrasting font types.The arching title font embodies the raffle ticket and contrasts with the blocky subtitles and text.
  58. 58. TYPE: GOOD EXAMPLE  The lowercase letters are understated and simple.Yet, the rounded corners communicate and informality that would not be emphasized by a typeface with sharp corners and hard edges.  Imperfection is emphasized through the break in font pattern and the spacing and slant of the last two letters in the word “imperfecle.”The alignment of the final word in the sentence is different than the rest of the letters resulting in an emphasis on the word. The letters and font are reinforcing the theme of the piece by demonstrating a that mistakes are easily made.
  59. 59. TYPE: BAD EXAMPLE  The typography doesn’t match the mood of the presentation topic. Using a no-nonsense font is fine for formal topics. Instead, the designer could select a typeface with more weight and rounded letters.The font type and color could mirror the shapes and colors in the supporting photo.  Since this is a PowerPoint presentation, legibility is important. Using a white font color against a background with white diagonal marks makes the words difficult to read.This problem may be even more pronounced for those sitting in the back of the room.
  60. 60. TYPE: BAD EXAMPLE  Placing the letters within words and between words equal distances apart causes problems for this sign.The kerning should be lengthened between words to de-emphasize the “F” with the “ART.”  The blue coloring that begins at the black letter “F” and encircles the “AR” augments the spacing issue because emphasizes the connection between the “FAR.”

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