Which tools are right for you?<br />The Toolbox…<br />
What problem/opportunity/<br />deliverable does this tool solve?<br />2. What value will it add? What will it accomplish?<...
1. Website<br /><ul><li>Home Base, face of credibility, trunk of your communications tree
Invest some money here
Make sure the backend is user friendly.</li></li></ul><li>Website basics (Kivi Miller)<br />1. Does the domain name make s...
Website basics<br />7. Are people featured? <br />8. Are there stories on the needs or successes?<br />9. Is it easy to co...
Website basics<br />11. Do you understand and implement the basics of SEO?<br />12. Are you using Google Analytics?<br />
2. Newsletter<br />A quarterly newsletter alone probably is not enough to make your message stick. <br />Consider sending ...
Newsletter basics<br />1. Think of yourself as your own media<br />2. Be moving to electronic: opt-in everywhere<br />3. B...
Newsletter basics<br />6. Are there strong calls to action?<br />7. Skip the jargon. Speak American. http://bit.ly/apKKeu ...
Facebook<br />Strengths: <br /><ul><li>250 million logon everyday for 35 minutes-500 million users (all demographics)
True, opt-in community
Lots of widgets: video, contests, donate, polls, incorporate blogs, twitter, slideshare
Others can tell your story
Cross promotion and branding opps
Landing pages
Mobile</li></li></ul><li>Facebook<br />Weaknesses:<br /><ul><li>Constant changes w/o input
Privacy concerns
Fan pages harder to build followings than friend pages
To use full options, you really need to pay attention to developer info
Direct participation needed-time</li></li></ul><li>Twitter<br />Strengths:<br /><ul><li>Usage going up
Benefits at every level of engagement
Becoming a respected broadcasting tool
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Toolbox for Social Media

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From the Bozeman Social Media Summit, my second presentation--the social media toolbox and how to decide what's right for you. Aimed at nonprofits, but works for everybody.

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  • Use whole words that are relatively short? You can abbreviate if too long but make it easily understandable. Consider purchasing multiple domains—they’re cheap. Certainly purchase all the ones with your name.Can I tell after the briefest glance whose website I’m on?Think about why people come. What three questions would they be seeking answers for? What three actions would they like to take? Easy navigation.Make it visualDon’t hide the donate now button where we have to search for it (w/churches, this is a comfort issue. I don’t like it there for churches.
  • Use whole words that are relatively short? You can abbreviate if too long but make it easily understandable. Consider purchasing multiple domains—they’re cheap. Certainly purchase all the ones with your name.Can I tell after the briefest glance whose website I’m on?Think about why people come. What three questions would they be seeking answers for? What three actions would they like to take?Make it visualDon’t hide the donate now button where we have to search for it (w/churches, this is a comfort issue. I don’t like it there for churches.7. Pictures of animals are fine, but also feature donors, clients, staff, and other people doing the work they love on your behalf8. Can you capture your mission statement in stories?
  • Use whole words that are relatively short? You can abbreviate if too long but make it easily understandable. Consider purchasing multiple domains—they’re cheap. Certainly purchase all the ones with your name.Can I tell after the briefest glance whose website I’m on?Think about why people come. What three questions would they be seeking answers for? What three actions would they like to take?Make it visualDon’t hide the donate now button where we have to search for it (w/churches, this is a comfort issue. I don’t like it there for churches.7. Pictures of animals are fine, but also feature donors, clients, staff, and other people doing the work they love on your behalf8. Can you capture your mission statement in stories?
  • Use an editorial calendar—every month does not have to be a “newsletter”. Just get something out—be creative.
  • You can’t rely on traditional media to get your message out.Newsletters should have an online link regardless if you are electronic or not5. Your newsletter, website, twitter, facebook, podcasts, whatever should all promote each other. Remember they are being bombarded everywhere. Shorter and frequent is better. Your message needs to get sticky (Made to Stick by Chip and Dan Heath)
  • 7. It’s about understanding the american cultural narrative. “playing by the rules,” “hit a home run”, family metaphors,
  • 7. It’s about understanding the american cultural narrative. “playing by the rules,” “hit a home run”, family metaphors,
  • Privacy: places instituted w/o approval. Have to go in and set privacyMy one big beef with Facebook is that they change things so often and have so many rules, it really is a labor-intensive medium if you are a business using it to promote.
  • Contests on twitter can also be a measuring device.
  • Using Twitter to monitor (curate) involves monitoring
  • Blogs can be written way ahead of time, unlike Facebook and Twitter scheduling.Daily piece can be a sermon reminder or a lead-in to an event.
  • Blog is not a place to just give your opinion. Needs to be articulate and contain helpful information. Subject matter needs to be generated by needs of readers, not writers.
  • Big Sky Youth Empowerment does this very well
  • podcasts can be a daily short news pieceSlide decks are esp. good for visuals (animal shelter) or event wrap-upsLocation-based platforms can be used in contests or promotions-have to deal with small use at this timeRSS: Real simple syndication. Several good ones—Google, Netvibes, Yahoo. If you have a blog, you should get an RSS registration with FeedBurner
  • A deliverable /value is a specific task the platform will perform such as converting donors, attendance at events. Know what the platform is capable of. Twitter probably can’t convert donors directly but it can direct people back to a donate page on your website.-Target Audience will result from your listening program in A-PIE-Resources are time, people, money-Time: you can do this weekly, or delegate this to an editorial calendar-Measuring Tools are examples. They are all free except stats plus for Vimeo
  • Toolbox for Social Media

    1. 1. Which tools are right for you?<br />The Toolbox…<br />
    2. 2. What problem/opportunity/<br />deliverable does this tool solve?<br />2. What value will it add? What will it accomplish?<br />3. What target audience does it serve? <br />4. Do we have time, resources, people?<br />5. How will we measure it? <br />
    3. 3. 1. Website<br /><ul><li>Home Base, face of credibility, trunk of your communications tree
    4. 4. Invest some money here
    5. 5. Make sure the backend is user friendly.</li></li></ul><li>Website basics (Kivi Miller)<br />1. Does the domain name make sense?<br />2. Do I know where I am?<br />3. Is there a clear path to answers or actions visitors are most likely seeking?<br />4. Does the home page include images?<br />5. Can I donate easily from the home page?<br />6. Are you capturing emails?<br />
    6. 6. Website basics<br />7. Are people featured? <br />8. Are there stories on the needs or successes?<br />9. Is it easy to contact you?<br />10. Do you regularly delete out-of-date content?<br />
    7. 7. Website basics<br />11. Do you understand and implement the basics of SEO?<br />12. Are you using Google Analytics?<br />
    8. 8. 2. Newsletter<br />A quarterly newsletter alone probably is not enough to make your message stick. <br />Consider sending a 1-2 page print, or 500 word electronic once a month—use an editorial calendar.<br />
    9. 9. Newsletter basics<br />1. Think of yourself as your own media<br />2. Be moving to electronic: opt-in everywhere<br />3. Build up your % of emails first<br />4. An editorial calendar should include content strategy. <br />5. Cross promote all your channels. Strive for shorter, more frequent communications in multiple places.<br />
    10. 10. Newsletter basics<br />6. Are there strong calls to action?<br />7. Skip the jargon. Speak American. http://bit.ly/apKKeu (Metaphor Project)<br />8. Use images<br />9. If you don’t want to send a newsletter every month, use an editorial calendar to vary the content and purposes.<br />
    11. 11. Facebook<br />Strengths: <br /><ul><li>250 million logon everyday for 35 minutes-500 million users (all demographics)
    12. 12. True, opt-in community
    13. 13. Lots of widgets: video, contests, donate, polls, incorporate blogs, twitter, slideshare
    14. 14. Others can tell your story
    15. 15. Cross promotion and branding opps
    16. 16. Landing pages
    17. 17. Mobile</li></li></ul><li>Facebook<br />Weaknesses:<br /><ul><li>Constant changes w/o input
    18. 18. Privacy concerns
    19. 19. Fan pages harder to build followings than friend pages
    20. 20. To use full options, you really need to pay attention to developer info
    21. 21. Direct participation needed-time</li></li></ul><li>Twitter<br />Strengths:<br /><ul><li>Usage going up
    22. 22. Benefits at every level of engagement
    23. 23. Becoming a respected broadcasting tool
    24. 24. Timely-needs can be immediately broadcast
    25. 25. Good resource (mining)
    26. 26. Contest/promotion platform
    27. 27. Mobile
    28. 28. Cross promotion tools if enough followers</li></li></ul><li>Twitter<br />Weaknesses:<br /><ul><li>140 character limit
    29. 29. Metrics are still developing
    30. 30. Timeliness—posts disappear quickly
    31. 31. Can become burdensome to follow
    32. 32. % of active users is low
    33. 33. Not really useful if timeliness is not a factor, except for mining (curator)
    34. 34. Direct participation needed - time</li></li></ul><li>Blogs<br />Strengths:<br /><ul><li>Establishes a source of authority
    35. 35. Good supplement to newsletter
    36. 36. Great place for story telling
    37. 37. Guest blog writers widen circle
    38. 38. Highlights staff and volunteers
    39. 39. Good platform for partnering
    40. 40. Not as much direct participation needed – time
    41. 41. Can be a very short daily piece (churches)</li></li></ul><li>Blogs<br />Weaknesses:<br /><ul><li>Irregular posters will kill a blog
    42. 42. Need to be a good writer
    43. 43. Same social rules apply--a blog is not a soapbox
    44. 44. Often hard to search-search mechanisms favor prolific bloggers
    45. 45. Need a good editorial purpose</li></li></ul><li>Video/Photo<br />Strengths:<br /><ul><li>You can tell a great story in 2 minutes or less or on a photo gallery site
    46. 46. Visual medium is most powerful
    47. 47. Shows human side or organization
    48. 48. Inexpensive to produce & post-compare
    49. 49. More Americans would rather watch than read
    50. 50. Good show piece for website or Facebook
    51. 51. Archive for other projects
    52. 52. National/expert (sermonspice or bluefish)</li></li></ul><li>Video/Photo<br />Weaknesses:<br /><ul><li>Can be time-consuming if done right
    53. 53. Some end-users will not have technology
    54. 54. Can be hard to search and measure
    55. 55. Requires initial investment of equipment and training</li></li></ul><li>Other<br />Podcasts:inexpensive to produce – good for interviews and how-to pieces. <br />Slide Decks: inexpensive – good for instructional or photo galleries<br />Location-based platforms: time-consuming, need a real purpose-privacy concerns. Can be part of an event promotion.<br />Live webstreaming: becoming more inexpensive (U Stream). Initial investment of equipment needed. Good for events (churches)<br />RSS Readers: Good personal tool as well as index-register blogs with Feedburner.<br />
    56. 56. Target<br />Audience<br />Resources<br />To Allocate<br />Time<br />Involved<br />Measure<br />Tool<br />Tool<br />Value/<br />Deliverable<br />
    57. 57. Recommended Resources:<br />Measure Everything: Is Your Nonprofit Facebook Page Worth It? ShabbirImberSafdar and ShaynaEnglin – a good look at how metrics can help you figure out Facebook. (free e-book from TruthyPR)<br />The Nonprofit Marketing Guide by Kivi Miller (blog also)<br />The Networked Nonprofit by Beth Kanter and Allison Fine (blog also)<br />Less Clutter/Less Noise by Kem Meyer (churches)<br />Trust Agents by Brogan and Smith (Brogan blog also)<br />Facebook Marketing: An Hour a Day by Mari Smith (blog also)<br />The Social Media Bible by Safko and Brake<br />Social Media Marketing: An Hour a Day by Evans<br />
    58. 58. Recommended Resources:<br />Dummies Books (SEO)<br />Inbound Marketing: How to Get Found by Halligan and Shah<br />Groundswell by Charlene Li<br />Blogs to follow for nonprofits:<br />Beth Kanter<br />Kivi Miller<br />Pew Internet Research<br />Socialize Your Cause<br />Getting Attention – Nancy Schwartz <br />
    59. 59. Recommended Resources:<br />Blogs to follow (faith-based)<br />Christian Web Trends Blog<br />Stuff Christians Like – Acuff<br />TimSchraeder.com<br />http://digital.leadnet.org/ (Church tech blog for non-techies)<br />ChurchMarketingSucks (lab for Center for Church Communications)<br />
    60. 60. Recommended Resources:<br />Blogs to follow (social media)<br />Liz Strauss (blogging)<br />Techipedia (Tamar Weinberg from Mashable)<br />Social Media Today (aggregator)<br />Mashable<br />Social Media Explorer<br />Chris Brogan (thought leadership)<br />BrandSavant by Tom Webster (metrics for real people)<br />

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