Backward Design - ID Theory

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This is an Instructional Design entitled "Backward Design" presented in the EDUC675 course by Cherrye.Robinson.

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  • This is the essence of what Dr. Robert Mager promotes, and it is very powerful toward making training efficacious, short, and cheap (I mean, low cost).
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  • This is essentially the same thing as systematic design explained by Dick and Carey.
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Backward Design - ID Theory

  1. 1. Backward Design Instructional Model “ One starts with the end- the desired results- and then derives curriculum from the evidence of learning” – Wiggins and McTighe, 2000
  2. 2. Premise <ul><li>Learning experiences should be planned with the end in mind </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers are able to avoid planning useless lessons </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers know if students are prepared for the assessment- can re-teach if necessary </li></ul><ul><li>Students are prepared for the final assessment </li></ul>
  3. 3. Traditional Curriculum Planning <ul><li>    Cover the curriculum map. </li></ul><ul><li>    Cover the unit rotation. </li></ul><ul><li>    Cover this title.  </li></ul><ul><li>    We’ve got these books in the book room.  We can’t afford new titles.  Let’s see what we can cover with these titles. </li></ul><ul><li>     I need to cover my favorite unit. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Three Stages to Backward Design <ul><li>Stage 1: Identify Desired Results </li></ul><ul><li>Stage 2: Determine Acceptable Evidence of Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Stage 3: Design Learning Experiences and instruction </li></ul>
  5. 5. Backward Design Stages <ul><li>  Stage 1: Identify Desired Results: </li></ul><ul><li>What should students know, understand, and be able to do?    </li></ul><ul><li>Stage 2: Determine Acceptable  Evidence of Learning </li></ul><ul><li>How will we know if students have achieved the desired results and met the standards?  </li></ul><ul><li>What will we accept as evidence of student understanding and proficiency?     </li></ul><ul><li>Stage 3: Design Learning Experiences            </li></ul><ul><li>Standards (national, state, district)     </li></ul><ul><li>Essential Questions     </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on assessment before designing the learning activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Plan instructional activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Share best practice. </li></ul>

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