WBS And Scheduling for eLearning Project Managament

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An overview of work breakdown structure, scheduling, and leveling resources for elearning projects.

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WBS And Scheduling for eLearning Project Managament

  1. 1. eLearning project management © 2010 Michael M. Grant | Image from beccaxsos at Flickr.com
  2. 2. © 2010 Michael M. Grant
  3. 3. <ul><li>Very similar to task analysis/content analysis, particularly Dick, Carey & Carey </li></ul><ul><li>Begin at the top </li></ul><ul><li>Name all the tasks </li></ul><ul><li>Organize the WBS </li></ul>(c) 2010 Michael M. Grant |
  4. 4. <ul><li>By top, we mean a top-down process </li></ul><ul><li>Begin by listing all the deliverables </li></ul>© 2010 Michael M. Grant | Image from Trip Deezil at Flickr.com
  5. 5. <ul><li>This is all the tasks and sub-tasks </li></ul><ul><li>Convert each deliverable and tasks into “real tasks” </li></ul><ul><li>Recognize the summary tasks and the work packages. </li></ul>© 2010 Michael M. Grant Verb + product = Task
  6. 6. <ul><li>Once all the work packages have been identified, arrange them, and there are multiple ways to do that. </li></ul><ul><li>How do you choose? It depends on what you want to communicate. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One may emphasize features. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>One may emphasize phases of a project </li></ul></ul>© 2010 Michael M. Grant
  7. 7. <ul><li>The WBS must be broken down starting at the top. </li></ul><ul><li>Work packages must add up to the summary task. </li></ul><ul><li>Each task must be named as an activity that produces a product </li></ul>© 2010 Michael M. Grant Verb + product = Task
  8. 8. <ul><li>“ perform analysis” </li></ul><ul><li>“ research” </li></ul><ul><li>“ database” </li></ul>© 2010 Michael M. Grant | Image from _boris at Flickr.com
  9. 9. <ul><li>No work packages should be smaller than 8 hours (1 day) </li></ul><ul><li>No task should be longer than the time between 2 status points/reporting periods </li></ul><ul><li>(No task should be at 50% for more than 2 status meetings.) </li></ul>© 2010 Michael M. Grant
  10. 10. <ul><li>Granularity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If it’s easier to estimate, break it down. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If it’s easier to assign, break it down. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If it’s easier to track, break it down. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If it’s not one of these, don’t break it down. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t forget to put PM into the WBS, maybe under “Manage project.” </li></ul>© 2010 Michael M. Grant | Image from bcostin at Flickr.com
  11. 11. <ul><li>Consider quality for each work package: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What does it mean to be complete with this task? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How do we know it was done correctly/well? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Types of quality checks: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reviews—SME review, design team review, alpha prototype, storyboard, expert review </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Standards—industry standards, internal checklist </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Testing—user testing, beta testing, 1-on-1, small group, field trial </li></ul></ul>© 2010 Michael M. Grant
  12. 12. <ul><li>A realistic schedule… </li></ul><ul><li>Includes detailed knowledge of the work to be done. </li></ul><ul><li>Has tasks sequenced in the correct order. </li></ul><ul><li>Accounts for external constraints. </li></ul><ul><li>Can be accomplished on time, given the availability of skilled people & enough equipment. </li></ul>(c) 2010 Michael M. Grant |
  13. 13. © 2010 Michael M. Grant
  14. 14. <ul><li>Sequence constraints—when one task/work package must be performed before another because of dependency </li></ul><ul><li>Indicate the predecessors for each activity </li></ul>© 2010 Michael M. Grant Activity Description Duration Immediate Predecessors 1.1 Analyze learners -- 1.2 Analyze context 1.1 2.1 Define performance gap 1.1, 1.2
  15. 15. <ul><li>Display your thinking with a network diagram </li></ul>© 2010 Michael M. Grant | Image from http://press.teleinteractive.net/yackity/2005/10/06/critical_path_in_schedule_management
  16. 16. <ul><li>Network diagram </li></ul><ul><li>Relationships </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Finish to start </li></ul></ul>© 2010 Michael M. Grant | Image from Microsoft at http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/project/HA101130671033.aspx Task B cannot begin until Task A is finished.
  17. 17. <ul><li>Network diagrams help present relationships among tasks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Finish to start </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Start to start </li></ul></ul>Task B cannot begin until Task A begins. © 2010 Michael M. Grant | Image from Microsoft at http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/project/HA101130671033.aspx
  18. 18. <ul><li>Network diagram </li></ul><ul><li>Relationships </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Finish to start </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Start to start </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Finish to finish </li></ul></ul>Task B cannot finish until Task A finishes. © 2010 Michael M. Grant | Image from Microsoft at http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/project/HA101130671033.aspx
  19. 19. © 2010 Michael M. Grant | Image from http://press.teleinteractive.net/yackity/2005/10/06/critical_path_in_schedule_management Activity Description Duration (in days) Immediate Predecessors 1.1 Analyze learners 14 -- 1.2 Analyze context 14 1.1 2.1 Define performance gap 2 1.1, 1.2
  20. 20. <ul><li>Identify resources (i.e., labor, equipment, materials) </li></ul><ul><li>Determine when each resource is needed and for how long. </li></ul><ul><li>Labor: in hours </li></ul><ul><li>Equipment: in hours </li></ul><ul><li>Materials: amount, when needed (task relationship) </li></ul>© 2010 Michael M. Grant | Image from Truthout at Flickr.com
  21. 21. <ul><li>Assign resources, primarily labor and equipment to tasks </li></ul><ul><li>Determine resources for each day and compare schedule </li></ul><ul><li>Some tasks may not be completed concurrently because of resource pool or additional resources may be needed </li></ul>© 2010 Michael M. Grant
  22. 22. <ul><li>Critical path </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The critical path is the longest path through the network, but represents the minimum amount of time a project will take. </li></ul></ul>© 2010 Michael M. Grant | Image from http://press.teleinteractive.net/yackity/2005/10/06/critical_path_in_schedule_management
  23. 23. <ul><li>Gantt </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Henry Gantt, early 1900s </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Horizontal axis shows schedule, vertical axis shows WBS </li></ul></ul>© 2010 Michael M. Grant | Image from http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Henri_Gannt.jpg
  24. 24. © 2010 Michael M. Grant | Image from Gary Booker at http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:GanttChartAnatomy.png
  25. 25. <ul><li>Time-scaled network </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Similar to Gantt, more on less paper </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Multiple tasks on the same line </li></ul></ul>(c) 2010 Michael M. Grant |
  26. 26. <ul><li>Booker, G. (2007). Ganttchartanatomy.png [image]. Retrieved January 27, 2010 from http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:GanttChartAnatomy.png </li></ul><ul><li>dmdk12. (2007). Development of the network diagram and critical path. Retrieved January 27, 2010 from http://www.slideshare.net/dmdk12/the-network-diagram-and-critical-path </li></ul><ul><li>Doval Santos, C.V. (2005). Critical path in schedule management [image]. Retrieved January 27, 2010 from http://press.teleinteractive.net/yackity/2005/10/06/critical_path_in_schedule_management </li></ul><ul><li>Lynch, M.M. & Roecker, J. (2007). Project managing e-learning: A handbook for successful design, delivery and management. New York: Routledge. </li></ul><ul><li>Schwalbe, K. (2010). Information technology project management (6th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Course Technology. </li></ul><ul><li>Verzuh, E. (2008). The fast forward MBA in project management (3 rd ed.). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. </li></ul>© 2010 Michael M. Grant

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