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Assessment Strategies

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How to design assessments to use with computer-supported learning activities.

Published in: Education, Technology
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Assessment Strategies

  1. 1. Assessment Strategies<br />Michael M. Grant 2010<br />Image from paul goyette at Flickr.com<br />
  2. 2. Reminder about computer functions…<br />See page 333 in your textbook.<br />
  3. 3.
  4. 4.
  5. 5. What is assessment?<br />What’s the point?<br />Image from courosa at Flickr.com<br />
  6. 6. Classifying Assessments<br />Traditional<br />Constructed Response<br />Essay<br />Short answer<br />Listing<br />Selected Response<br />MC<br />T/F<br />Matching<br />Fill in the blank<br />Non-traditional/ alternative/ authentic/ performance-based<br />Portfolio<br />Rubric<br />Checklist<br />Task List<br />
  7. 7. <ul><li>Traditional
  8. 8. Constructed Response
  9. 9. Essay
  10. 10. Short answer
  11. 11. Listing
  12. 12. Selected Response
  13. 13. MC
  14. 14. T/F
  15. 15. Matching
  16. 16. Fill in the blank</li></ul>Classifying Assessments<br /><ul><li>Non-traditional/ alternative/ performance-based
  17. 17. Portfolio
  18. 18. Rubric
  19. 19. Checklist
  20. 20. Task List</li></ul>Assessment is not necessarily an either-or option.<br />
  21. 21. Key Issues<br />Match assessment to objectives<br />Match assessment to objectives<br />Match assessment to objectives<br />The language (the exact words) in the assessment item should be very, very, very, very similar to your objective. It’s okay for it to be that way.<br />
  22. 22. In a simple example, it should be like this…<br />Be sure the language is aligned fromobjective to assessment.<br />
  23. 23. Match your assessment strategy to the difficulty level of your objective.<br />
  24. 24. We’re going to focus on …<br />Task Lists<br />Rubrics<br />Because we’re emphasizing using technology to support student learning and building student products.<br />
  25. 25. Tasks Lists<br />Rating scale, <br />Content items and process skills, <br />Any work habits, <br />Any social/group skills, <br />Any technology skills,<br />Possibly any metacognitive skills, <br />Is developmentally appropriate for the grade level you specified.<br />
  26. 26. Page 311 in your textbook<br />
  27. 27.
  28. 28.
  29. 29. Where do the tasks come from?<br />Image from Lshaveat Flickr.com<br />
  30. 30. Your Turn: Write the task list for the following objective.<br />Given five pumpkins, calculate the mean weight in pounds within .5 pounds. <br />
  31. 31. Rubrics<br />Assessment criteria<br />Rating scale<br />Levels of performance<br />Is developmentally appropriate. <br />
  32. 32.
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  34. 34.
  35. 35.
  36. 36. Your Turn: Write the rubric for the following objective.<br />Given five pumpkins, calculate the mean weight in pounds within .5 pounds. <br />
  37. 37.
  38. 38. Weighting?<br />Do I look fat?<br />Image from kk+ at Flickr.com<br />
  39. 39. References & Acknoledgements<br />Airasian, P.W. (2000). Assessment in the classroom (2nd ed.). Boston: McGraw-Hill.<br />
  40. 40. Michael M. Grant 2010<br />

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