The Post Gastrectomy Diet
Learning to eat the post-gastric
bypass way.
Presented by:
Mikal Spinks, Haley Saylor,
Shawndra ...
What is the
Gastric Bypass diet?
The gastric bypass diet is a diet that is
specifically intended for individuals
recoverin...
Literature Review Table
Team
Member
Database/Journal
Article Citation
Summary
Statement
Website Summary
Statement
DeAnna
M...
Menu & Analysis
Maintenance Stage (Stage 5)
By: DeAnna McNeal
Literature Review Table
Team
Member
Database/
Journal Article
Citation
Summary
Statement
Website Summary
Statement
Mikal
S...
Menu & Analysis
Maintenance Stage (Stage 5)
By: Mikal Spinks
Team Member Database/Jour
nal Article
Citation
Summary
Statement
Website Summary
Statement
Haley
Saylor
Nursing
Reference
...
Haley Saylor
Team Member Database/ Journal Article
Citation
Summary Statement
Shawndra Anderson SAGE
Postgastrectomy
Nutrition.
Nutriti...
Analysis Results Personal Diet List
Nutrient Total Rec. %Rec
Calories 1619.49 2200 73.61%
Pro (g) 151.03 50 302.06%
Fat (g...
The post-gastric bypass diet is difficult to evaluate as a stand-alone diet because it is designed for
people who are reco...
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The Post-Gastrectomy Diet

  1. 1. The Post Gastrectomy Diet Learning to eat the post-gastric bypass way. Presented by: Mikal Spinks, Haley Saylor, Shawndra Anderson, and DeAnna McNeal June 30, 2013
  2. 2. What is the Gastric Bypass diet? The gastric bypass diet is a diet that is specifically intended for individuals recovering from gastric-bypass surgery. It is a step-by-step plan as to what foods and beverages you can and cannot eat or drink, how to prepare those foods, and when and how much of those foods you should consume at each meal. The meal- planning process usually consists of four to five stages of progressions but should be customized for each individual patient. The plan should be adhered to strictly for maximum results and optimal health. The purpose for the diet is to allow the sutures in the stomach to heal without too much strain or stretching. It also serves as a means to acclimate the patient to the smaller amounts of food that will be consumed on a regular basis in order to achieve optimum weight loss results. A patient’s success will ultimately be determined by their commitment to making a lifestyle change in their eating habits and exercise routines. The health benefits of Gastric Bypass surgery and the diet that follows far surpass the complications that could arise. DeAnna McNeal
  3. 3. Literature Review Table Team Member Database/Journal Article Citation Summary Statement Website Summary Statement DeAnna McNeal CINAHL Patient education. Five-stage post- operative gastric bypass diet progression. (2004). Nutrition in Clinical Care, 7(1), 40-42. The article is a detailed description for patient teaching describing the progression of the post- operative gastric bypass diet. http://search.ebs cohost.com.libp roxy.troy.edu/lo gin.aspx This link gives direct access to the database where the article and information were received. The website provides information on the diet that the patient is to adhere to following their gastric bypass surgery.
  4. 4. Menu & Analysis Maintenance Stage (Stage 5) By: DeAnna McNeal
  5. 5. Literature Review Table Team Member Database/ Journal Article Citation Summary Statement Website Summary Statement Mikal Spinks SAGE Postgastrectom y Nutrition. Nutrition in Clinical Practice. vol. 26 no. 2 pp 126-136 Rogers, C April 2011 This article is a description of the physiology behind common post gastrectomy complications. It provides guidelines for the medical and nutrition management of these complications, and presents a basic approach to postgastrectomy gastrointestinal symptoms. http://ncp.sag epub.com/co ntent/26/2/126 .full Website allows for full text viewing of Post Gastrectomy Nutrition advice on deficiencies and diet requirements. This website reveals that there is not sufficient literature to support a standard post gastrectomy diet. Rather, individualized diet manipulation for symptom relief is recommended .
  6. 6. Menu & Analysis Maintenance Stage (Stage 5) By: Mikal Spinks
  7. 7. Team Member Database/Jour nal Article Citation Summary Statement Website Summary Statement Haley Saylor Nursing Reference Center Gastrectomy (2007) This journal goes into detail about what a gastrectomy is. It also goes into great detail about why a patient would need a gastrectomy. http://trojan.tr oy.edu/library/ databases.html # This link gives direct access to the database where the journal article can be found. This website provides information on the diet and reasons why the patient would need this procedure. Literature Review Table
  8. 8. Haley Saylor
  9. 9. Team Member Database/ Journal Article Citation Summary Statement Shawndra Anderson SAGE Postgastrectomy Nutrition. Nutrition in Clinical Practice. Vol. 22 Pgs. 22-28 This article states how obesity is associated with a number of problems and can be associated with hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea, diabetes mellitus, these are just a few things. The gastric bypass surgery provides a great benefit of losing the weight as well as improving your health conditions over a short period of time. All it takes is commitment as well as determination. Following a strict diet after surgery will give you the best results.
  10. 10. Analysis Results Personal Diet List Nutrient Total Rec. %Rec Calories 1619.49 2200 73.61% Pro (g) 151.03 50 302.06% Fat (g) 22.87 73.33 31.19% Carb (g) 198.47 -- Fiber (g) 11.41 30 38.03% Cal (mg) 2011.58 1000 201.16% Iron (mg) 7.64 10 76.4% Na (mg) 1674.64 2400 69.78% Pot (mg) 4639.71 -- Phos (mg) 2496.26 700 356.61% Ash (g) 16.57 -- vitA (IU) 23334.19 4000 583.35% vitC (mg) 43.63 75 58.17% Thia (mg) 0.97 1.1 88.18% Ribo (mg) 3 1.1 272.73% Nia (mg) 35.9 14 256.43% H2O % 54.87 Female 31-50 -- satF (g) 7.17 24.44 29.34% monoF (g) 7.18 24.44 29.38% polyF (g) 4.55 24.44 18.62% Chol (mg) 235.36 300 78.45% Food Item Number of Servings Serving Size Total grams WATER-BOTTLED-POLAND SPRING 8 1 floz 237.04 grams MILK-COW-DRY-SKIM-NON -FAT SOLIDS-REGULAR- W/ADDED VIT A 8 1 floz 120 grams COUSCOUS-COOKED 1 1 c 180 grams BEANS-SNAP-GREEN VAR -CKD-BOILED-DRAINED- WO/SALT 1 1 c 124 grams BLUEBERRIES-RAW 1 1 CUP 145 grams PUDDING-JELLO COOK&SERVE; CHOCOLATE W/ 2%MILK 4 1 floz 147 grams PEACHES-CANNED-X-LIGHT SIRUP -SOL&LIQ 1 1 floz 30.88 grams CHEESE-COTTAGE; FAT FREE; BREAKSTONE'S 2 1 oz 56.7 grams YOGURT-NONFAT; LIGHT N LIVELY; STRAWBERRY 8 1 oz 226.8 grams CARROTS-CKD-BOILED- DRAINED -W/SALT 0.5 1 c 78 grams CHICKEN-ROASTING-MEAT ONLY -CKD-ROASTED 1 1 CUP 140 grams FISH/SHELLFISH-SWORDFISH -COOKED-DRY HEAT 6 1 OZ 170 grams Shawndra Anderson
  11. 11. The post-gastric bypass diet is difficult to evaluate as a stand-alone diet because it is designed for people who are recovering from gastric bypass surgery. The surgery and post-operative diet places many restrictions on what types of food you can and cannot have and how they must be prepared. Its purpose is to help the healing process of the stomach and allow the patient to slowly become acclimated to eating smaller amounts of food. This diet not only helps the patient to lose weight, but it also aids in sustaining his or her weight loss long term. There are many factors that play a role in the success of post-gastric bypass weight loss. Nutrition management for the patient needs to be individualized and will require careful monitoring. Most post-operative routines follow a process of progressive stages. This process can be very time consuming due to the patient’s tolerance or intolerance of the diet’s constant changes. After surgery, most patients wait two days before they begin eating again. The first step is to only take in small amounts of liquid. This step will show how the patient can tolerate foods after surgery. The next step introduces a small variety of foods to the diet; however, these foods must be mashed, pureed, or blended. Soft, solid foods will be added to the diet in step number three. Finally, following this step you may begin to eat solid foods. However, there are limitations to the types of solid foods allowed. The restrictions include foods such as: tough meats, nuts, and sodas. In order to achieve maximal results, there are many guidelines and restrictions that must be adhered to. Some of these guidelines are: keep meals small, take vitamin and mineral supplements, drink liquids between meals, eat and drink slowly, chew food thoroughly, try new foods one at a time, focus on high-protein foods, and avoid foods that are high in fat and sugar. Over an extended period of time these limitations could present the problems of inadequate nutrient balance and poor vitamin absorbency. Throughout the recovery process the patient must ensure that they get enough vitamins and minerals and keep their weight-loss goals on track. In addition to these deficiencies other health complications exist, such as dehydration, nausea, vomiting, constipation, pouch blockage, dumping syndrome, and weight loss failure. Some of these difficulties may occur even when the diet is being followed exactly. With a balanced diet and routine follow-up visits with the surgeon, the patient can reduce their risk of complications or even prevent them from happening. The benefits of gastric bypass surgery, the post-gastric bypass diet, and the life-saving weight loss that ensues still outweighs the possible complications that come along with it. There is still room for improvement and from what can be gathered from research, clinical experts understand the need for enhanced patient success in the future. Group Consensus Statement Post-Gastric Bypass Diet

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