Distracted Students

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  • The “333 Rule”
    A rebel knows how to prepare for a presentation. He or she lives and dies by something I like to call the “333 Rule.”
    This concept is simple and is the hallmark of a captivating and memorable presentation.

    3 goals: Remember the lesson from Aristotle. Build trust. Win people. Deliver results.
    3 stages: Every presentation has a strong beginning, middle, and end. In other words, it has a powerful introduction, body, and conclusion.
    3 points: Before you pick-up a writing utensil to start your presentation outline, define the three takeaways do you want to leave with your audience. Three points. No more, no less.
    333. Simple, isn’t it? It’s the rebel way.
    factual: Show statistics, graphs, charts – anything to help solidify that you know what you are discussing. Credibility comes tual: tual: Show statistics, graphs, charts – anything to help solidify that you know what you are discussing. Credibility comes instantly when your audience perceives you as an expert. Present your facts but proceed with caution – there is a gray line between presenting too much and too little information. Say too much and eyes will glaze over. Say too little and people will think you are a poser.Be Giving: Life is about contribution. It’s about sharing with the masses. A great presenter equips his or her listeners with the tools, knowledge, and resources needed to help them grow. People want to walk away with something of value. Provide them with something that either motivates, changes, or improves their life.
    Feast On ItMost presentations today are easy to forget. The key objective with delivery is to create memorable presentations. Thus, if there is only one thing you remember about delivery, remember this concept. It is called the Chow Technique. Try this method the next time you speak in public. It will increase memory and retention levels.
    A great presentation is like a fabulous three course meal. In other words, it is like great chow. Think of your favorite restaurant. What did you eat? Perhaps some filet mignon, risotto, or maybe you enjoyed a nice glass of chardonnay. No matter what it was, I’m sure it was delicious. A great presentation is laid out the same way.
    Starter: A captivating presentation has a strong open. Maybe it’s a story. Perhaps it is simply asking a question. Whatever it may be, it needs to be captivating.
    The Main Course: Your entrée (body) needs to be flavorful and engaging. It should also be simple, and easy to digest.
    Dessert: Your ending needs to be as strong as your open. There is an old saying amongst actors: “By their entrances and their exits shall ye know them.”
    End strong or you risk losing credibility.
  • Distracted Students

    1. 1. Strategies and Systems For Distracted Students Michael Boll, Grade 7 Teacher and Technology Coach, Concordia International School
    2. 2. All materials are available at www.mrboll.com
    3. 3. The takeaways Identify a distracted child Learn useful systems and strategies Motivation for you and them
    4. 4. Start of my career
    5. 5. Beautiful place
    6. 6. Yeah, why Marry me? not I mean it was a beautiful place
    7. 7. I was not always focused on work
    8. 8. Students were students
    9. 9. Some were annoying and energetic
    10. 10. Some were annoying and energetic
    11. 11. Easily explained
    12. 12. Easily explained Lazy
    13. 13. Easily explained Lazy Did not try hard
    14. 14. Easily explained Lazy Did not try hard Did not want to do well
    15. 15. Easily explained Lazy Did not try hard Did not want to do well Needed discipline
    16. 16. Easily explained Lazy Did not try hard Did not want to do well Needed discipline Just needed to get motivated
    17. 17. Off to Saudi Arabia
    18. 18. Students were much better
    19. 19. Still distracted students
    20. 20. But of course they were just Lazy Did not try hard Did not want to do well Needed discipline Just needed to get motivated
    21. 21. Then one day... Yeah sure Mr. Boll I kid think you have ADD
    22. 22. It did cause me to think back to when I was younger Michael you need to try harder and get motivated. You don’t want people to think you are lazy. Yes dad
    23. 23. And then somebody out there thought I needed
    24. 24. A new perspective
    25. 25. Realization: Not all kids are typical
    26. 26. Was I wrong about my distracted students? Lazy Do not try hard Do not want to do well Need discipline Just need to get motivated
    27. 27. Paradigm shift? All students want to do well!
    28. 28. All kids want to do well
    29. 29. All kids want to do well
    30. 30. Spotting a distracted student
    31. 31. Ability Performance 55 41.25 27.5 13.75 0 School Typical Student
    32. 32. Ability Performance 60 45 30 15 0 School A discrepancy between ability and performance
    33. 33. Other signs Poor muscle tone (thin) Poor handwriting Messy desk, room, book bag Loses books, pens, calculators, self Leaves things all over the place
    34. 34. Portrait of a distracted student
    35. 35. Portrait of a distracted student
    36. 36. They need a clear pathway for optimal performance
    37. 37. Response to intervention (RTI) model
    38. 38. Six steps to success
    39. 39. Step one: systems for organization
    40. 40. Reminder: distracted kids are often very bright Yet struggle to remember specific details or ideas Often their short-term memory is limited
    41. 41. School: the planner becomes your memory--traditional
    42. 42. School: the planner becomes your memory--electronic
    43. 43. Day-to-day: Pocket Mod(pocketmod.com)
    44. 44. Day-to-day: Pocket Mod(pocketmod.com)
    45. 45. Day-to-day: ◊
    46. 46. Day-to-day: ◊
    47. 47. Keep systems simple Three systems or less is best Warning: distracted kids will orient toward complex systems. They are so interesting!
    48. 48. Step two: limit distractions
    49. 49. The homework path of one of my former students
    50. 50. The homework path of one of my former students
    51. 51. The homework path of one of my former students
    52. 52. The homework path of one of my former students
    53. 53. The homework path of one of my former students
    54. 54. The homework path of one of my former students
    55. 55. The homework path of one of my former students
    56. 56. The homework path of one of my former students
    57. 57. The homework path of one of my former students
    58. 58. The homework path of one of my former students
    59. 59. The cookie theory
    60. 60. Paper is the enemy
    61. 61. Binders can be a disaster
    62. 62. Desktops are a catastrophe
    63. 63. Backpacks are a calamity
    64. 64. Lockers are a tragedy
    65. 65. Schedule weekly paper checks
    66. 66. Computers are fill in the blank...
    67. 67. Serious competition for attention
    68. 68. Unplug
    69. 69. Step three: increase focus levels
    70. 70. Create opportunities to hyper-focus
    71. 71. Work in timed chunks Computer Traditional
    72. 72. Music and podcasts
    73. 73. Step four: build a support team
    74. 74. Cheerleaders Teachers Parents Friends Coaches Aunt, uncle, etc
    75. 75. Step five: motivation
    76. 76. It is a building process Not a quick fix Takes days, months years Results can last a lifetime
    77. 77. Negotiation vs. demand
    78. 78. Get buy in from him/her Students want to do well right? You can usually lead them down the path to buy in to the ideas.
    79. 79. Step six: keeping you motivated
    80. 80. Response to intervention Is it working? Is it not working?
    81. 81. Common concerns Am I enabling him/her? Will he/she ever make it? Others?
    82. 82. What about you? Watch burn out Take breaks Lean on the support team
    83. 83. Steps in review 1. Create an organization system(s) 2. Limit distractions 3. Use strategies to increase focus levels 4. Build a support team 5. Motivation for him/her 6. Motivation for you
    84. 84. Order of importance? 1. Build a support team 2. Motivation for him/her 3. Motivation for you 4. Create an organization system(s) 5. Limit distractions 6. Use strategies to increase focus levels
    85. 85. Remember: distracted students also want to do well
    86. 86. They just are not typical students
    87. 87. And there are a lot of us non- typical learners out there...
    88. 88. And you will find them here
    89. 89. Michael Boll Michael@autismpodcast.org

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