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Homework from last class: <ul><li>Complete the Onion Root Lab Activity and The Cell Cycle and Cancer worksheet </li></ul><...
Ch 5.1 Review <ul><li>Who can tell me… </li></ul><ul><li>1)  What are the phases of mitosis? </li></ul><ul><li>prophase, m...
Ch 5.1 Review <ul><li>Who can tell me… </li></ul><ul><li>4)  What is the importance of checkpoints in the cell cycle? </li...
Asexual Reproduction Chapter 5.2  pp. 166-178
Asexual Reproduction <ul><li>What is asexual reproduction? </li></ul><ul><li>asexual reproduction:  reproduction that requ...
Asexual Reproduction <ul><li>A  clone  is an identical genetic copy of its parent. </li></ul><ul><li>Many organisms natura...
Activity time! Types of Asexual Reproduction
Activity Instructions: <ul><li>I will make 6 groups – each group will research a particular kind of asexual reproduction: ...
Activity Instructions: <ul><li>Write your summary on the transparency and present your information to the class. </li></ul...
Types of Asexual Reproduction
Binary Fission – p. 168-169 <ul><li>Binary fission : single parent cell organism splitting into 2 identical copies </li></...
Budding – p. 170 <ul><li>Budding  - areas of multicellular organisms  undergo repeated mitosis and cell division to form a...
Fragmentation – p. 170 - 171 <ul><li>Fragmentation  -  part of an organism breaks off due to injury , and the  part grows ...
Vegetative Reproduction – p. 172 <ul><li>Vegetative reproduction  - special cells in plants (usually in stems or roots) th...
Vegetative Reproduction – p. 172 <ul><ul><li>Main benefits:  Can allow crop harvest (e.g. potatoes), can make cuttings and...
Spore Formation – p. 174 <ul><li>Spore formation  - some bacteria, micro-organisms and fungi can form spores - single repr...
Advantages and Disadvantages: Asexual Reproduction Table 5.1 p. 175
Homework for next class: <ul><li>Answer Reading Check Questions 1-5 p. 178 </li></ul><ul><li>Study for  Quiz on Asexual Re...
Works Cited <ul><li>Images taken from the following sources: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.saburchill.com/ans02/chapters/ch...
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Sci 9 Lesson 4 Mar 1 and 2 - Ch 5.2 Asexual Reproduction

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BC Science 9
Ch. 5.2 Asexual Reproduction
pp. 166-178

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Sci 9 Lesson 4 Mar 1 and 2 - Ch 5.2 Asexual Reproduction

  1. 1. Homework from last class: <ul><li>Complete the Onion Root Lab Activity and The Cell Cycle and Cancer worksheet </li></ul><ul><li>Read notes on Cancer on the class blog (in this slideshow) </li></ul><ul><li>Keep working on your Mitotic Movies project </li></ul><ul><li>Read over class notes and check out the class blog: http:// msoonscience.blogspot.com / </li></ul>
  2. 2. Ch 5.1 Review <ul><li>Who can tell me… </li></ul><ul><li>1) What are the phases of mitosis? </li></ul><ul><li>prophase, metaphase, anaphase, telophase </li></ul><ul><li>2) What do the nucleus and chromosomes look like during prophase? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>- Nucleolus disappears, nuclear membrane begins to break down. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- Chromosomes become visible and they attach themselves to spindle fibers at the centromeres. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3) How does cytokinesis differ in plant and animal cells? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>animal cell: cell membrane pinches together and the cell divides </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>plant cell: cell plate forms to make new cell wall and cell membrane </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Ch 5.1 Review <ul><li>Who can tell me… </li></ul><ul><li>4) What is the importance of checkpoints in the cell cycle? </li></ul><ul><li>- At these checkpoints, the cell can be stopped from growing or dividing if conditions are unsuitable. </li></ul><ul><li>- Important for survival of the organism. </li></ul><ul><li>What may happen if the checkpoint proteins no longer function? </li></ul><ul><li>If a mutation occurs in a gene producing the instructions for the checkpoint protein, then cell cycle control will be lost  could lead to cancer. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Asexual Reproduction Chapter 5.2 pp. 166-178
  5. 5. Asexual Reproduction <ul><li>What is asexual reproduction? </li></ul><ul><li>asexual reproduction: reproduction that requires only one parent and produces offspring that are genetic copies of the parent </li></ul>
  6. 6. Asexual Reproduction <ul><li>A clone is an identical genetic copy of its parent. </li></ul><ul><li>Many organisms naturally form clones via asexual reproduction. </li></ul><ul><li>Cloning is also used in agriculture and research to copy desired organisms, tissues and genes. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Animals (sheep, pigs, cattle, horses) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Plants (ornamental shrubs, trees) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Livestock breeds and plant production </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Skin cells (grow new tissue for burn victims) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Healthy genes (replace mutated ones) </li></ul></ul></ul>Dolly the sheep – the world’s first cloned animal
  7. 7. Activity time! Types of Asexual Reproduction
  8. 8. Activity Instructions: <ul><li>I will make 6 groups – each group will research a particular kind of asexual reproduction: (starts on p. 168) </li></ul><ul><li>Binary Fission </li></ul><ul><li>Budding </li></ul><ul><li>Fragmentation </li></ul><ul><li>Vegetative Reproduction </li></ul><ul><li> Benefits of Vegetative Reproduction </li></ul><ul><li>Spore Formation </li></ul><ul><li>15 minutes to summarize your assigned type of asexual reproduction – use the information in the textbook. </li></ul><ul><li>Each group member must choose a role: </li></ul><ul><li>writer, encourager, discussion leader, questioner, conflict negotiator </li></ul>
  9. 9. Activity Instructions: <ul><li>Write your summary on the transparency and present your information to the class. </li></ul><ul><li>You will complete a self-evaluation and will receive a teacher evaluation for your group effort and accuracy. </li></ul><ul><li>You will be quizzed on this material after the activity so pay attention!!! </li></ul>
  10. 10. Types of Asexual Reproduction
  11. 11. Binary Fission – p. 168-169 <ul><li>Binary fission : single parent cell organism splitting into 2 identical copies </li></ul><ul><li>Binary fission is the only method of reproduction for some types of bacteria. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Since bacteria do not have a nucleus, they do not undergo mitosis ; however, the one ring of DNA does replicate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In favourable environmental conditions, bacteria can reproduce every 20 minutes! </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Budding – p. 170 <ul><li>Budding - areas of multicellular organisms undergo repeated mitosis and cell division to form an identical organism. </li></ul><ul><li>Buds sometimes detach to form a separate organism. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Example: Hydra, sponges, and yeast </li></ul></ul>Budding yeast cells
  13. 13. Fragmentation – p. 170 - 171 <ul><li>Fragmentation - part of an organism breaks off due to injury , and the part grows into a clone of the parent </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sea star - if an arm detaches, it can develop into another sea star </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plants - aquatic weeds (e.g. Eurasian milfoil) </li></ul></ul>Sea Star Regeneration video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7cXeWxxfD4&feature=player_embedded
  14. 14. Vegetative Reproduction – p. 172 <ul><li>Vegetative reproduction - special cells in plants (usually in stems or roots) that develop into structures that form new plants identical to the parent </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples: Tulip, daffodil, hyacinth bulbs, potatoes, strawberries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Main disadvantage: new plants grow very close together  competition for resources (soil, nutrients, light) </li></ul></ul>
  15. 15. Vegetative Reproduction – p. 172 <ul><ul><li>Main benefits: Can allow crop harvest (e.g. potatoes), can make cuttings and grafts of house plants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In grafting , parts of a desirable plant are removed and attached to a rooted stock of another plant </li></ul></ul>p. 174
  16. 16. Spore Formation – p. 174 <ul><li>Spore formation - some bacteria, micro-organisms and fungi can form spores - single reproductive cells that can grow into a whole new organism by mitosis </li></ul><ul><li>Light weight - can be carried by wind or water </li></ul><ul><li>Can grow in suitable environment (enough moisture, temperature, and food) </li></ul><ul><li>Have tough outer coating to allow them to survive harsh conditions </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: bread mold, mosses, ferns </li></ul>
  17. 17. Advantages and Disadvantages: Asexual Reproduction Table 5.1 p. 175
  18. 18. Homework for next class: <ul><li>Answer Reading Check Questions 1-5 p. 178 </li></ul><ul><li>Study for Quiz on Asexual Reproduction </li></ul><ul><li>Keep working on your Mitotic Movies project - due March 8 for Science 9 (1-1) and March 9 for Science 9 (2-4) </li></ul><ul><li>Read over class notes and check out the class blog: http:// msoonscience.blogspot.com / </li></ul>
  19. 19. Works Cited <ul><li>Images taken from the following sources: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.saburchill.com/ans02/chapters/chap051.html </li></ul><ul><li>http:// www.tutornext.com /help/yeast-reproduction-budding </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.cosmosmagazine.com/news/392/hello-dolly-the-sheep-changed-world </li></ul><ul><li>http://regentsprep.org/regents/biology/units/reproduction/asexual.cfm </li></ul><ul><li>http://andyannie.pbworks.com/w/page/5454436/Reproduction </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.labtechindia.net/budding-in-hydra-1612.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://resources.schoolscience.co.uk/sgm/sgmmicrobes3.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://teacher2.smithtown.k12.ny.us/ksiolos/Science/Science8/Science8Units/R&D.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://regentsprep.org/regents/biology/units/reproduction/asexual.cfm </li></ul>

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