UWF WRITING LAB RULES OF THUMB FOR ADJECTIVE AND ADVERB USE From  Real Good Grammar, Too   by Mamie Webb Hixon
Adjectives and Adverbs <ul><li>Use  adjectives  after  sense verbs  such as  look, smell, taste, feel,  or  sound  or afte...
Bad  and  Badly <ul><li>Bad  is an adjective:  I feel  bad  about the delay. </li></ul><ul><li>Badly is an adverb: It does...
Good  and  Well   <ul><li>Good  is an adjective:  You look  good  in blue.  You wear it  well . </li></ul><ul><li>Well  is...
Real  and  Really <ul><li>Real  is an adjective meaning &quot;genuine&quot;;  really  is an adverb:  The admiral has  real...
Sort of  and  kind of   <ul><li>Sort of  and  kind of  are often misused in written English by writers who actually mean  ...
Question and Answer Session <ul><li>Are there any questions about the rules of using adjectives and adverbs? </li></ul><ul...
LET’S PRACTICE!!! <ul><li>Our minister pronounces his words very (precise, precisely). </li></ul><ul><li>PRECISELY </li></...
LET’S PRACTICE A LITTLE MORE!!! <ul><li>She looks (different, differently) at the situation now. </li></ul><ul><li>DIFFERE...
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Adjectives and adverbs

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Adjectives and adverbs

  1. 1. UWF WRITING LAB RULES OF THUMB FOR ADJECTIVE AND ADVERB USE From Real Good Grammar, Too by Mamie Webb Hixon
  2. 2. Adjectives and Adverbs <ul><li>Use adjectives after sense verbs such as look, smell, taste, feel, or sound or after linking verbs ( is, am, are, was, were and other forms of be ): The steak tastes very good. </li></ul><ul><li>Most adverbs end in – ly ; use adverbs after transitive and intransitive verbs/verbs of action: She submits her paperwork promptly . </li></ul>
  3. 3. Bad and Badly <ul><li>Bad is an adjective: I feel bad about the delay. </li></ul><ul><li>Badly is an adverb: It doesn't hurt so badly now. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Good and Well <ul><li>Good is an adjective: You look good in blue. You wear it well . </li></ul><ul><li>Well is an adverb: He gets along well with his co-workers. </li></ul><ul><li>Well is also an adjective when it is used to refer to health: I am not well today. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Real and Really <ul><li>Real is an adjective meaning &quot;genuine&quot;; really is an adverb: The admiral has real charm, so he is really charismatic. </li></ul><ul><li>The use of real as an adverb is colloquial or nonstandard: He writes real really well. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Sort of and kind of <ul><li>Sort of and kind of are often misused in written English by writers who actually mean rather or somewhat : Lannie was kind of rather saddened by the results of the test. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Question and Answer Session <ul><li>Are there any questions about the rules of using adjectives and adverbs? </li></ul><ul><li>PLEASE ASK! </li></ul>
  8. 8. LET’S PRACTICE!!! <ul><li>Our minister pronounces his words very (precise, precisely). </li></ul><ul><li>PRECISELY </li></ul><ul><li>My pen was writing so (bad, badly) that I threw it away. </li></ul><ul><li>BADLY </li></ul><ul><li>The experts are (somewhat, kind of) undecided about the wisdom of such a tax. </li></ul><ul><li>SOMEWHAT </li></ul><ul><li>The woman looked (different, differently) than she did the day before. </li></ul><ul><li>DIFFERENT </li></ul>
  9. 9. LET’S PRACTICE A LITTLE MORE!!! <ul><li>She looks (different, differently) at the situation now. </li></ul><ul><li>DIFFERENTLY </li></ul><ul><li>I feel (bad, badly) about missing the concert. </li></ul><ul><li>BAD </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure that she stirs the cookie batter (good, well). </li></ul><ul><li>WELL </li></ul><ul><li>Ted is a (real, really) good singer. </li></ul><ul><li>REALLY </li></ul>

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