Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Les Fêtes de Nuit à la Exposition. From L’Exposition de Paris (1900).1900.
The Paris Exposition of 1889What was the significance of the 1889 Exposition Universelle inParis?• The future was the chie...
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Charles Garnier. Japanese house (left) and Chinese house (right) inGarniers "History of Habita...
The Fin de Siecle: From Naturalism to SymbolismWhat is the fin de siecle?• Art Nouveau — As an international movement, Art...
• The Symbolist Imagination in the Arts — The Symbolists aimedto describe the transitory feelings of people through symbol...
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Louis Comfort Tiffany. Stained-glass window. ca, 1894.43" × 27-1/2”.
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Victor Horta. Tassel House, Brussels. 1892-93.
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Jan Toorop. Delftsche Slaolie. Dutch advertisement poster. 1894.37-3/4" × 21-1/4”.
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Auguste Renoir. The Kiss. 1888-89.54-1/2" × 43-1/2" × 46-1/2”.
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Auguste Renoir. Monument to Balzac. Garden of the Museum. 1898.106-1/4" × 47-1/4" × 50-3/8”.
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Auguste Renoir. Dancing Figure. 1905.12-7/8" × 9-7/8”.
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Miss Loïe Fuller. 1893.Sheet: 15-1/8" × 11-1/16”.
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. At the Moulin Rouge. 1892-95.4’ 3/8" × 4’ 7-1/4”.
 Active Listening Guide: Debussy: La Mer, IMyArtsLabChapter 33 – The Fin De Siècle: Toward the Modern
Post-Impressionist PaintingWhat is Post-Impressionism?• Pointillism: Seurat and the Harmonies of Color — Seurat’smasterpie...
• Escape to Far Tahiti: Gauguin — Symbolists valued thecomparative quiet of the countryside over the turmoil of cities. Ga...
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Georges Seurat. A Sunday on La Grande Jatte. 1884-86.81-3/4" × 121-1/4”.
 Closer Look: George Seurat,Sunday on La Grande JatteMyArtsLabChapter 33 – The Fin De Siècle: Toward the Modern
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Georges Seurat. Les Poseuses (The Models). 1886-88.78-3/4" × 98-3/8”.
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Vincent van Gogh. Night Café. 1888.28-1/2" × 36-1/4”.
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Vincent van Gogh. The Starry Night. 1889.28-3/4" × 36-1/4”.
 Closer Look: Vincent van Gogh,The Starry NightMyArtsLabChapter 33 – The Fin De Siècle: Toward the Modern
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Paul Cézanne. The Gulf of Marseilles seen from l’Estaque. ca. 1885.31-1/2" × 39-1/4”.
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Paul Cézanne. Mont Sainte-Victoire. 1902-04.28-3/4" × 36-3/16”.
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Paul Cézanne. Closer Look: The Peppermint Bottle. 1893-95.26" × 32-3/8”.
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Paul Cézanne. Closer Look: Still Life with Plaster Cast. ca. 1894.26-1/2" × 32-1/2”.
 Closer Look: Paul Cézanne,Still Life with Plaster CastMyArtsLabChapter 33 – The Fin De Siècle: Toward the Modern
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Paul Gauguin. Mahana no atua (Day of the God). 1894.27-3/8" × 35-5/8”.
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Claude Monet. Setting Sun. Panel from the Water Lillies murals. ca. 1921-22.6’ 6-3/4" × 19’ 8-...
Toward the ModernHow does Symbolism manifest itself outside of France?• The New Moral World of Nietzsche — Rather than the...
• The Painting of Isolation: Munch — In Skrik (The Scream) theartist’s depiction of the horrifying anxiety of modern life ...
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Claude Monet. Room 1 of the Water Lilies, Musée de l’Orangerie, Paris,France.
 Closer Look: Claude Monet, Water LiliesMyArtsLabChapter 33 – The Fin De Siècle: Toward the Modern
 Active Listening Guide: Mahler: SymphonyNo. 1, IIIMyArtsLabChapter 33 – The Fin De Siècle: Toward the Modern
 Active Listening Guide: Brahms: SymphonyNo. 4, IVMyArtsLabChapter 33 – The Fin De Siècle: Toward the Modern
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Edvard Munch. Skrik (The Scream). 1893.36" × 29”.
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Gustav Klimt. Judith I. 1901.33" × 16-1/2”.
Africa and EmpireHow did developments in Africa reflect European beliefs andsensibilities?• European Imperialism — Europea...
• Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness — No fiction writerexamined European imperialist schemes in Africa more critically tha...
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Map: Imperial expansion in Africa to 1880.
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Map: Imperial expansion in Africa from 1880 to 1914.
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Giorgio de Chirico. Continuity & Change: The Childs Brain. 1914.31-1/8" × 25-5/8”.
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Sayre2e ch33 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150674

  1. 1. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Les Fêtes de Nuit à la Exposition. From L’Exposition de Paris (1900).1900.
  2. 2. The Paris Exposition of 1889What was the significance of the 1889 Exposition Universelle inParis?• The future was the chief attraction of the Paris Exposition, andinvention was the key word of the day. Thomas Edison exhibited 493new devices. The most popular object was Gustav Eiffel’s tower placedat the entrance of the fair and which quickly became one of the city’slandmarks.
  3. 3. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Charles Garnier. Japanese house (left) and Chinese house (right) inGarniers "History of Habitation" exhibit, Exposition Universelle, Paris.1889.
  4. 4. The Fin de Siecle: From Naturalism to SymbolismWhat is the fin de siecle?• Art Nouveau — As an international movement, Art Nouveau includedarchitecture, glassware, textiles, furniture, and painting. This “new art”endeavored to elevate feelings, imagination, and the power of dreamsas creative inspiration.• Exposing Society’s Secrets: The Plays of Henrik Ibsen —The fin de siecle spirit was apparent in the later works of Ibsen. Hisplay, A Doll’s House offered a depiction of Victorian marriage, with it soppression of women and cruelty of men.
  5. 5. • The Symbolist Imagination in the Arts — The Symbolists aimedto describe the transitory feelings of people through symbolic languageand images in an effort to convey the essential mystery of life. Thesculptor Rodin, in his most famous sculptures, The Kiss, was apurposeful homage to the opposite sex. A number of artists engaged inexperiments that combined music, dance, painting, and the newelectrical lighting technology. Dancing the can-can became popular atthe Moulin Rouge. Music’s ability to bring to mind a torrent of imagesand thoughts without speech is almost perfectly realized in Debussy’scomposition Prelude a l’apres-midi d’un faune.• Discussion Question: What is the tension in Ibsen’s A Doll’s House?
  6. 6. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Louis Comfort Tiffany. Stained-glass window. ca, 1894.43" × 27-1/2”.
  7. 7. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Victor Horta. Tassel House, Brussels. 1892-93.
  8. 8. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Jan Toorop. Delftsche Slaolie. Dutch advertisement poster. 1894.37-3/4" × 21-1/4”.
  9. 9. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Auguste Renoir. The Kiss. 1888-89.54-1/2" × 43-1/2" × 46-1/2”.
  10. 10. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Auguste Renoir. Monument to Balzac. Garden of the Museum. 1898.106-1/4" × 47-1/4" × 50-3/8”.
  11. 11. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Auguste Renoir. Dancing Figure. 1905.12-7/8" × 9-7/8”.
  12. 12. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Miss Loïe Fuller. 1893.Sheet: 15-1/8" × 11-1/16”.
  13. 13. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. At the Moulin Rouge. 1892-95.4’ 3/8" × 4’ 7-1/4”.
  14. 14.  Active Listening Guide: Debussy: La Mer, IMyArtsLabChapter 33 – The Fin De Siècle: Toward the Modern
  15. 15. Post-Impressionist PaintingWhat is Post-Impressionism?• Pointillism: Seurat and the Harmonies of Color — Seurat’smasterpiece, A Sunday on La Grande Jatte depicts a crowd ofParisians enjoying the weather. It is a carefully controlled, scientificapplication of tiny dots of color—pointilles.• Symbolic Color: Van Gogh — Van Gogh studied Seurat’spaintings and Seurat’s emphasis on contrasting colors became aningredient in his synthesis of techniques. Color become symbolic,charged with feelings.• The Structure of Color: Cezanne — Cezanne’s color is notsymbolic but is used to structure the space of the canvas. He painteden plein-air which allowed a representation of nature as a series ofpatches of color.
  16. 16. • Escape to Far Tahiti: Gauguin — Symbolists valued thecomparative quiet of the countryside over the turmoil of cities. Gauguinleft France for the island of Tahiti. In his paintings color is freed of itsrepresentational function to become an almost pure expression of theartist’s feelings.• Escape to Giverny: The Late Monet — The tract of land ownedby Monet included a pond where he planted water lilies and built aJapanese bridge. Then he began to paint the ensemble repeatedly.• Discussion Question: What are some of the dominant characteristics ofPost-Impressionist painting?
  17. 17. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Georges Seurat. A Sunday on La Grande Jatte. 1884-86.81-3/4" × 121-1/4”.
  18. 18.  Closer Look: George Seurat,Sunday on La Grande JatteMyArtsLabChapter 33 – The Fin De Siècle: Toward the Modern
  19. 19. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Georges Seurat. Les Poseuses (The Models). 1886-88.78-3/4" × 98-3/8”.
  20. 20. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Vincent van Gogh. Night Café. 1888.28-1/2" × 36-1/4”.
  21. 21. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Vincent van Gogh. The Starry Night. 1889.28-3/4" × 36-1/4”.
  22. 22.  Closer Look: Vincent van Gogh,The Starry NightMyArtsLabChapter 33 – The Fin De Siècle: Toward the Modern
  23. 23. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Paul Cézanne. The Gulf of Marseilles seen from l’Estaque. ca. 1885.31-1/2" × 39-1/4”.
  24. 24. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Paul Cézanne. Mont Sainte-Victoire. 1902-04.28-3/4" × 36-3/16”.
  25. 25. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Paul Cézanne. Closer Look: The Peppermint Bottle. 1893-95.26" × 32-3/8”.
  26. 26. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Paul Cézanne. Closer Look: Still Life with Plaster Cast. ca. 1894.26-1/2" × 32-1/2”.
  27. 27.  Closer Look: Paul Cézanne,Still Life with Plaster CastMyArtsLabChapter 33 – The Fin De Siècle: Toward the Modern
  28. 28. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Paul Gauguin. Mahana no atua (Day of the God). 1894.27-3/8" × 35-5/8”.
  29. 29. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Claude Monet. Setting Sun. Panel from the Water Lillies murals. ca. 1921-22.6’ 6-3/4" × 19’ 8-3/8”.
  30. 30. Toward the ModernHow does Symbolism manifest itself outside of France?• The New Moral World of Nietzsche — Rather than the rationalityof Socrates, Nietzsche described the turbulent conflict between the“Apollonian” force that leads to the art of sculpture, the beautiful illusionof the ideal form, and the “Dionysian” force which expresses itself inmusic and dance, with their ability to excite the senses.• On the Cusp of Modern Music: Mahler and Brahms — Thesecomposers dominated the music scene in Vienna. Mahler wasinfluenced by Nietzsche’s The Birth of Tragedy in his Symphony No. 1.The compositions of Brahms are rich in musical allusions to Beethovenand Bach among others. His Fourth Symphony is startlingly modern.
  31. 31. • The Painting of Isolation: Munch — In Skrik (The Scream) theartist’s depiction of the horrifying anxiety of modern life is unmatched inthe work of any previous painter.• The Vienna Secession: Klimt — This artist was a master of theerotic who sought to liberate art from the confines of conventionalmorality, believing that human life was driven by sexual desire.• Discussion Question: What does Nietzsche mean by the “death ofGod”?
  32. 32. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Claude Monet. Room 1 of the Water Lilies, Musée de l’Orangerie, Paris,France.
  33. 33.  Closer Look: Claude Monet, Water LiliesMyArtsLabChapter 33 – The Fin De Siècle: Toward the Modern
  34. 34.  Active Listening Guide: Mahler: SymphonyNo. 1, IIIMyArtsLabChapter 33 – The Fin De Siècle: Toward the Modern
  35. 35.  Active Listening Guide: Brahms: SymphonyNo. 4, IVMyArtsLabChapter 33 – The Fin De Siècle: Toward the Modern
  36. 36. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Edvard Munch. Skrik (The Scream). 1893.36" × 29”.
  37. 37. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Gustav Klimt. Judith I. 1901.33" × 16-1/2”.
  38. 38. Africa and EmpireHow did developments in Africa reflect European beliefs andsensibilities?• European Imperialism — European domination of the continentspread after 1880 beginning with the opening of the Suez Canal.Economic wealth was at stake in the form of phosphates, ivory, rubber,and especially diamonds.• Social Darwinism: The Theoretical Justification forImperialism — This view explained the supposed social and culturalevolution that elevated Europe (and the white race) above all othernations and races. Europeans were the “fitter” race, and thus destinedto dominate the world. This view was used to validate imperialism.
  39. 39. • Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness — No fiction writerexamined European imperialist schemes in Africa more critically thanJoseph Conrad. He used his experiences as captain of a riversteamboat in the Congo as the basis of his novella Heart of Darkness.Ambiguity lies at the heart of the story – “darkness” itself being ametaphor for a world without clarity.• Discussion Question: What is social Darwinism? Was Darwin aproponent of this theory?
  40. 40. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Map: Imperial expansion in Africa to 1880.
  41. 41. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Map: Imperial expansion in Africa from 1880 to 1914.
  42. 42. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Giorgio de Chirico. Continuity & Change: The Childs Brain. 1914.31-1/8" × 25-5/8”.

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