Innovation Without Boundaries - People's Insights Aug & Sept 2015

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In this issue of the People’s Insights monthly brief, we explore nine trends that demonstrate that ‘business as usual’ is dead, and that technology is redefining business models, ethics and responsibilities.

We hope you enjoy this issue. Let us know what you think at @PeoplesLab. Connect with us on Twitter @msl_group.

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Innovation Without Boundaries - People's Insights Aug & Sept 2015

  1. 1. Photo:epSos.deon Flickr Innovation without Boundaries PEOPLE’S INSIGHTS MONTHLY BRIEF: AUGUST & SEPTEMBER
  2. 2. 2Introducing: Innovation without Boundaries Index About People’s Insights Bonus insights Business - A force for good Building ecosystems Digital privacy Introduction Innovation without Boundaries In today’s tech-driven world, innovation is a necessity for business. It’s a stepping stone for new entrants to the market, and it’s increasingly crucial for established players. To stay relevant in this age of big bang disruption, tech-driven startups need to continue to innovate, maintain their speed of growth,and predict (and deliver on) the next big thing. Established businesses need to re-examine their business models to address the threats fromdisruptive players. The ever-evolving digital playground acts as a double-edged sword. It forces businesses to stay on their toes, while also allowing them to experiment with unchartered territories. People are growing increasingly aware of how businesses impact society at large, and a collective conscience is on the rise. They expect businessesto solve today’s big challenges, to become change-makers and to lead the way to a bettertomorrow. ‘BIG BANG DISRUPTION’ In six years,Airbnb has impacted the hospitality industry significantly. Between 2011 and 2013,Airbnb cut the revenues of the hotel industry by 5% in the states where it was most active. Meanwhile, Uber, has the taxi industry in an array, and the auto sector worried that people will be less inclined to own cars in the future. Yet,Airbnb owns no properties, and Uber owns no cars.
  3. 3. 3Introducing: Innovation without Boundaries Index About People’s Insights Bonus insights Business - A force for good Building ecosystems Digital privacy Introduction In this issue of the People’s Insights monthly brief, we explore 9 trends that demonstrate that ‘business as usual’ is dead, and that technology is redefining business models, ethics and responsibilities. Making business a force for good The concept of ‘butterfly effect’comes to mind here, with some businesses responding – in big ways – to customers’reactions,and other businesses launching their own movementsfor good. 1. Delta Air Lines bans big-game trophies– Afterglobal backlash over the killing of Cecil the Lion by an American dentist in Africa,Delta Air Lines announced they were banning shipments of big-gametrophies. 2. Nike Flyease – In response to a letter froma young boy with cerebral palsy, Nike created a line of shoes fordisabled athletes. What is off the hinges of custom, people believe to be off the hinges of reason. - Michel de Montaigne
  4. 4. 4 Photo:chico945onFlickr Introducing: Innovation without Boundaries 3. Burger King’s ‘McWhopper’ proposal to McDonald’s – Burger King invited rival McDonald’s to come together for International Peace Day to jointly create the ‘McWhopper’ burger. 4. Google’s Project Sunroof – Google now lets people map the solar potential of their roofs, right from their homes. 5. Chivas Regal’s ‘The Venture’ – The liquor brand brings back its innovation challenge for a second season, to encourage social entrepreneurship. Building ecosystems If businesses don’t evolve in response to changing market conditions and people’s evolving needs, they risk losing their competitive edge. This is especially true for leading social networks and apps – which need to build ecosystems to keep attracting people (old and new) and to develop revenue streams. 6. Twitter’s ‘Buy Now’ button – Twitter is now expanding its ‘Buy’ button to allow anyone to sell via tweets. 7. Uber’s ‘Arriving Now’ and Airbnb’s ‘Pineapple’ – Coincidently, both start ups are experimenting with their own print magazines. Index About People’s Insights Bonus insights Business - A force for good Building ecosystems Digital privacy Introduction
  5. 5. 5Introducing: Innovation without Boundaries Digital privacy – how much is at stake? Social networks may have largely proliferated almost every aspect of civilian and business life, but worries over data privacy and misuse remain one of the biggest concerns among businesses, governments and citizens alike. We seem to be at a cross-roads of the privacy issue. What happens though, as more and more businesses that promise transparency and privacy get embroiled in data-related crises? 8. AshleyMadison Hack – The hacking of AshleyMadison, a website that enables extra-marital affairs, and the subsequent leak of its database demonstrates the devastating impact of privacy breaches. 9. Twitter shuts down Politwoops – Twitter revoked access to its API to Politwoops, a website that archived politicians’ deleted tweets, raising concerns about Twitter going against transparency. Photo:Paul Downey on Flickr Index About People’s Insights Bonus insights Business - A force for good Building ecosystems Digital privacy Introduction
  6. 6. 6Index Making business a force for good 1. Delta Air Lines bans big-game trophies 2. Nike Flyease 3. Burger King’s ‘McWhopper’ proposal to McDonald’s 4. Google’s Project Sunroof 5. Chivas Regal’s ‘The Venture Diversifying to create more business value 6. Twitter’s ‘Buy Now’ button 7. Uber’s ‘Arriving Now & Airbnb’s ‘Pineapple’ Digital privacy – how much is at stake? 8. AshleyMadison Hack 9. Twitter shuts down Politwoops Bonus Insights 11 16 20 24 27 31 34 38 42 45 Index About People’s Insights Bonus insights Business - A force for good Building ecosystems Digital privacy Introduction
  7. 7. Making business a force for good Photo: Leo Grübleron Flickr
  8. 8. 8DeltaAirLinesbans big-game trophies Delta Air Lines bans big-game trophies Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Building ecosystems Digital privacyIndex Business - A force for good Public outcry over an international incident often has the power to spark debates around seldom – discussed or controversial topics. One notable such incident fromthis year has been the hunting down and killing of Cecil the Lion – a much-loved and famousmemberof Zimbabwe’s Hwange National Park – by an American dentist.Afterthe dentist was identified as the person who allegedly lured Cecil out of his protected enclosure to kill him, the internet was flooded with incensed reactions fromacross the world, fromcivilians and animal welfare activists. So impassioned was the backlash that barely a week afterthe incident, Delta Air Lines, which flies direct to South Africa,announced that it would no longer allow the shipment of endangered animal trophies (or big-game trophies) on its flights. Delta’s move was a direct result of a change.org petition urging the airlineto end the shipment of big-game trophies.With its decision, Delta is joining (and inspiring) an increasing number of airlines who have taken a stand against safari hunting,and in favor of conservation of Africa’s celebrated Big Five: the lion, elephant, leopard, buffalo and rhino. The petitionon change.org
  9. 9. Public sentiment is pushing companies to rethink their business policies The hunting of Cecil by a tourist – broughtto light the significant role airlines play in propagatingtrophy kills. Export of exotic animal hunting trophies is big business, both forthe hunters and the airlines that carry them in their cargo. It’s interesting to note that a few monthsbefore the incident, Delta issued a statementsaying that they would continue the shipment of trophy kills, as long as they were legal. The intense backlash post Cecil’s death pushed the company to change its stand. In addition to Delta, American airlines and United airways have made similar announcements.An international group of airlines is calling foran industry- wide ban against carry hunting trophies. The incident also triggered reactions fromvarious establishments– the Empire State Building paid its first ever video tribute to honor Cecil and other endangered animals; and plush-toy maker Ty launched ‘Cecil the Lion’ toys to raise funds forendangered animals. The internethas resulted in a world where news has no borders.Businesses are more scrutinized than ever for their behaviors, and are expected to act in a socially responsible manner.Delta’s change of heart is indicative of the growing trend – or rather,priority – amongstcompanies to become morepurpose oriented. Also read:CustomersboycottUPS and FedExafterfirms REFUSEto stop shippingbig game hunttrophies 9DeltaAirLinesbans big-game trophies Via Consumerist via WashingtonPost Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Building ecosystems Digital privacyIndex Business - A force for good
  10. 10. 10NikeFlyease Matthew Walzer penned an open letter to Nike CEO Mark Parker in the summerof 2012, about living with cerebral palsy and the difficulty in tying shoe laces. Little did he know that it would be the startof a long association with Nike. In his letter,Matthew described how despite overcoming several physical challenges, something as simple as tying his shoes was among the most difficult tasksfor him. As someone planning to attend college soon, the concern was real and pressing forMatthew. His simple request to Nike was to consider designing a shoe that would enable him and countless others like him to overcome this challenge and be more independent. His letter,simply known as the #NikeLetter,quickly became viral on social media. It caught the attention of Mark Parker,who promptly alerted Nike’s senior director of athletic innovation Tobie Hatfield. This led to a three-year development process,resulting in the creation of the Zoom Soldier 8 Flyease - a new line of footwearwithan easy-entry mechanism that people withmuscle disabilitiescan wearwithoutany difficulty, and most importantly, on their own. Originallypostedat Matthew’s blog Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Building ecosystems Digital privacyIndex Business - A force for good Nike Flyease
  11. 11. Listening – and acting – to make a difference When Tobie Hatfield came across the letter,he was incidentally working with Paralympians to address the same challenges Matthew faced,and also with the Challenged Athletes Foundation. Matthew’s letter inspired his team to furtherinnovate and make the shoe available in the marketfor everyday people. He invited Matthew on board and with his inputs, perfected the Flyease technologyfor its special line of shoes. Hatfield says, “The main thing was about him getting in the shoes, adjusting the shoes, closing the shoes, and then be able to get out of the shoes, all by himself.” The Zoom Soldier 8 Flyease launched earlier this year. It was inspired by Matthew’s favoritebasketball star LeBron James. And, Nike sent the shoes to two U.S. basketball teams participating in the 2015 Special Olympics World Summer Games. The Flyease technology will next be used to make running shoes for disabled athletes.The shoe could be a life-changerfor many people – and brings to life Nike’s motto- If you have a body, you are an athlete. Matthew with the Flyeaseprototype,and the Zoom Soldier8 FLYEASE.Photo:Nike 11NikeFlyease Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Building ecosystems Digital privacyIndex Business - A force for good
  12. 12. He inspired us at Nike to be able to bring something special for the masses. I think it’s an unbelievable story, and I’m very honored and very blessed that my shoe is part of the whole project. The inspiration that he gave us is going to last for a lifetime. LeBron James Basketball Player NikeFlyease 12 Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Building ecosystems Digital privacyIndex Business - A force for good
  13. 13. It might be the age of smart partnerships and collaboration, but it’s hard to imagine some rival brands working together. Take fast-food chains Burger King and McDonald’s, for example. In a recent campaign though,that’s exactly what Burger King suggested – that the two come togetherto create the ‘McWhopper’,a fusion of their bestselling Big Mac and Whopperburgers.Burger King suggestedthis as a way to ‘settle the beef’ in honor of InternationalDay of Peace, observed by the United Nations on September21st. The initiative involved operating a pop-up restaurantfor one day at Atlanta – mid-way fromBurger King’s HQ at Miami and McDonald’s HQ in Chicago. The pop-up restaurantwould be staffedby employees of both companies, and the branding would be a mash-upof the two companies’ brand elements. The larger purpose of this collaboration was to raise awareness for Peace One Day, a non-profitthat helped establish the annual day of global ceasefire and non-violence. twitter.com/BurgerKing 13Burger King’s‘McWhopper’Proposalto McDonald’s Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Building ecosystems Digital privacyIndex Business - A force for good Burger King’s ‘McWhopper’proposal to McDonald’s
  14. 14. Burger King launched the campaign with full-page print ads in The Chicago Tribune and The New York Times, which read, “Wecome in peace. We know we’ve had our petty differences,but how about we call a cease-fireon these so-called ‘burger-wars’?” Burger King also published a video and a website explaining how the initiative would work and how customers could pay forthe burger– by simply pledging to ‘end the beef’ with someone. People loved it. The McWhopperproposal dominated conversations on the day, as people shared their reactions to the concept and speculated on McDonald’s response.More importantly, Burger King’s proposal brought people’s attention to the upcoming International Peace Day. The campaignalso established BurgerKing as the ‘good guy’ leading change and peace-keeping efforts with its larger rival McDonald’s. WatchBurgerKing’sproposal 14Burger King’s‘McWhopper’Proposalto McDonald’s Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Building ecosystems Digital privacyIndex Business - A force for good
  15. 15. McDonald’s rejection = a missed opportunity? McDonald’s rejected the proposal on Facebook,with a note fromCEO Steve Easterbrook.Rather than partnering with Burger King to create the McWhopper,McDonald’s proposed a larger more meaningful effortto address the suffering of war: “We love the intention but think our two brands could do something bigger to make a difference.” People following the incident found the response to be ‘smug,’and lent their support to BurgerKing. In fact,so many people took BurgerKing’s ‘side’ on social media, that it seems McDonald’s may have missed an opportunityor ‘lost’ this battle with Burger King. Burger King ultimately went ahead with its Peace Day plans, partnering with Denny’s, Krystal, Giraffas and Wayback Burgers. And McDonald’s led a multi-industry effortto support the UN’s World Food Programmein raising awareness about the impact of food assistance, on International Peace Day. Burger King participated and applauded McDonald’s efforts.But these developments made farfewer headlines than the initial proposal and rejection. These representthe majorityof theresponsesto McDonald’srejection(1, 2 and 3). 15Burger King’s‘McWhopper’Proposalto McDonald’s Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Building ecosystems Digital privacyIndex Business - A force for good
  16. 16. The thing I love about the McWhopper Project, is it walks the walk, it leads by example and demonstrates a genuine commitment to Peace Day, and a more peaceful and sustainable world. Corporate activism on this scale creates mass awareness and awareness creates action and action saves lives. Jeremy Gilley Founder, Peace One Day 16Burger King’s‘McWhopper’Proposalto McDonald’s Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Building ecosystems Digital privacyIndex Business - A force for good
  17. 17. WatchIntroducingProjectSunroof While more people are becoming familiar with the concept of rooftop solar, they are not as quick to install solar power systems in their homes. It seems to be a complicated process with a steep learning curve – from figuring out how much energy one’s home can produce to finding the right solar power partner. Google knows this – because these are the kind of questions people enter into its search engine while looking for information around solar power. The rising inclination towards solar-powered homes – and the confusionaround it – gave Google engineering lead Carl Elkin the idea for Project Sunroof . Project Sunroof is a new tool that answers people’s solar energy-related questions with personalized recommendations and suggestions.Users simply need to provide their address and average monthly electric bill, and Project Sunroof uses existing data fromGoogle Earth and Google Maps to determine how much energy a user’s roof receives, how many solar panels they may need, and how much money they could save. As a final step, it also suggestssolar power providers within the user’s vicinity that they could get in touch with. At present,Google is testing Project Sunroof in three cities – Boston, San Francisco and Fresno – with plans to eventually introduce it worldwide. 17Google’sProject Sunroof Google’s Project Sunroof Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Building ecosystems Digital privacyIndex Business - A force for good
  18. 18. 18Google’sProject Sunroof Photo:Google Google is broadening its environment stewardship and sustainability offer. As one of the world’s largest and most influential corporations,Google is expected to lead action for some of the most pressing challenges the world facestoday, like clean energy.In 2011, Google created a $280 millionfund withAmerican solar company SolarCityto support residentialsolar installations.In 2013, Google financed a part of South Africa’s largest solar power plant. WithProject Sunroof,Google is simplifying solar power forpeople, with easy-to-accessand relevant, personalized, information.This could significantly help more people determine the potential of solar energy in their own homes. The big question comes down to this – can Google do for solar energy whatit did for search engine? Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Building ecosystems Digital privacyIndex Business - A force for good
  19. 19. I’ve always been surprised at how many people I encounter who think that “my roof isn’t sunny enough for solar,” or “solar is just too expensive.” Certainly many of them are missing out on a chance to save money and be green. Carl Elkin Engineering Lead for Project Sunroof Google’sProject Sunroof 19 Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Building ecosystems Digital privacyIndex Business - A force for good
  20. 20. Photo:Chivas The Venture Chivas:Winthe rightway Start-up culture has rapidly caught on in the past decade, and a sub-culture has grown within it – that of social entrepreneurship. Social entrepreneurship involves building businesses that, in addition to making profits, also focus on driving positive change by addressing social problems. Young entrepreneursare driving this trend,and the number of social enterprisesin the world is on the rise. For example, in the UK 70,000 social enterprisescontribute £18.5 billion to the economy (2012). Large corporations are eager to encourage this trend and support social businesses, as part of their owncorporate social responsibility, brand purpose, innovation and business diversification. Take liquor giant Chivas Regal’s The Venture– a global project aimed at funding start-ups that benefit local communities or solve global problems.The Venture is a global social innovation challenge that gives entrepreneursthe chance to win a portion of $1 million, participate in an acceleratorprogramand gain access mentors. Launched in 2014, The Venture is back for season two. 20ChivasRegal’s‘TheVenture’ Chivas Regal’s ‘The Venture’ Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Building ecosystems Digital privacyIndex Business - A force for good
  21. 21. 16 social entrepreneurs, 16 countries Earlier this year, social entrepreneursfrom16 countries participated in the final round of The Venture,pitching their idea to judges and competing for funds.Their experience, and the shortlisting of the candidates has been capturedin a video-series (available on YouTube).16 winners, from16 countries participated in the acceleratorprogram. Chivas also partnered withcrowdfundingsite Indiegogo,to give people a chance to participateand support their favoriteentrepreneurs.On Indiegogo,people could vote to tell Chivas how to divide $250,000fromthe $1 million prize money. In addition, people could give funds directly to the social entrepreneurs– each entrepreneurhad their own Indiegogo crowdfunding page. In all, the entrepreneurs raised US 1.1 million. The contestculminated with Chilean food distribution enterpriseAlgramo emerging as the winner, and was given the largest share of the $1 million fund- $ 300,000 – to further develop their idea. The firstseasons was so popular – with 1,000 entries fromacross the world – that Chivas decided to launch it again. Fresh applications are already being accepted,and the winner is slated to be announced in 2016. Chivas also announced plans to launch an Australian version of The Venture. The five finalistson The Venture.Photo:The Venture 21ChivasRegal’s‘TheVenture’ Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Building ecosystems Digital privacyIndex Business - A force for good
  22. 22. More and more people today want to be actively involved in making a difference, and many are seeking the entrepreneurial route to do so. There’s a growing awareness that business can be a force for good, that purpose-driven businesses can change lives for the better.People are beginning to realize that it’s difficult for non-profits to alone effectchange at a large scale – businesses need to step in to accelerate it. Collaborative social innovation challenges can be a good way forlarge businesses to support social entrepreneurship. Read about a similar initiative by Coca-Cola, the Coca-Cola Founders Program – through which the company is partnering with entrepreneurs, and using its own scale and expertise to help them achieve scale. The 16 socialentrepreneursparticipatingin The Venture,facebook.com/livewithchivalry 22ChivasRegal’s‘TheVenture’ Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Building ecosystems Digital privacyIndex Business - A force for good
  23. 23. Building Ecosystems Photo:John Morgan on Flickr
  24. 24. E-commerce has grown exponentially is now a $220 billion industry, growing at almost 20% per year. Social networks want a share of this – Facebook and Pinterest have been testing ways to incorporate e- commerce within their networks.And joining this list is Twitter. Twitter recentlyannounced that it will be adding ‘Buy Now’ buttonsin tweets for users and merchants in the U.S.. This feature was firsttested last September– users were allowed to make purchases directly from Twitter,without having to visit an external website. Twitter has partnered with e-commerce giants Bigcommerce, Demandware, payment service Stripe Relay and retailers and brands like Best Buy, Adidas and PacSun for this venture Twitter’s other e-commerce pilot projects include Twitter Offers (which work by syncing offersdirectly to credit or debit cards) – and curator’s collections (which allows celebrities to create a ‘shop-front’of their products on Twitter). Photo:Twitter 24Twitter’s ‘BuyNow’Button Twitter’s ‘Buy Now’button Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Business – A force for good Digital privacyIndex Building ecosystems
  25. 25. Are people ready for social commerce? There is data to supportthat e-commerceon the mobile, or m-commerce,is on the rise - 50.3% of e-commercetraffic originates mobile devices and 43% of those who shop on smartphones make a purchase.But this is when people use their mobile devices specifically to make a purchase. Social networks are people’s social sanctuaries– they’re used to make and maintain social connections,and to share their lives with their peers. People are already engaging with brands and advertisements on social networks, but how receptive will they be on being sold something directly within their personal space? The key is forsocial networks to integrate e-commerce in a non-intrusive manner,and forbrands to find creative ways to promotethese . Photo:Twitter 25Twitter’s ‘BuyNow’Button Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Business – A force for good Digital privacyIndex Building ecosystems
  26. 26. Our customers live on Twitter, so giving them an easy way to buy products that they discover in their Twitter feed, without leaving the app, is a no-brainer. Because social media is our single most important marketing tool today, social commerce is obviously a key part of our overarching strategy. Anything we can do to shorten the gap between social engagement and shopping is a top priority. Gary Schoenfeld PacSun CEO Twitter’s ‘BuyNow’Button 26 Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Business – A force for good Digital privacyIndex Building ecosystems
  27. 27. Brands that are successful in the sharing economy space and exploring ways to strengthen their communities and tell their stories. Uber recently launched ‘Arriving Now’ – an in-car magazine forUber rides in New York. The firstissue of Arriving Now coincided with Fashion Week New York in September,and is packed with “pro tips, hotspots,and exclusive details about upcoming promotions.” Similarly, Airbnb, rolled out the firstissue of its magazine Pineapple last winter. Pineapple is sold in bookstores and retailers across North America and Europe, and was made available to Airbnb hosts in the 30,000 cities and 192 countries where it operates. Both companies have a strong user base. The exploration of print- magazines seems to be a way to furtherstrengthentheir USPs (especially in the case of Uber which has re-coded the taxi experience), and to create a platformfor rich stories (in the case of Airbnb). And, as some point out – to experiment with an additional source of revenue. Photo:Arriving Now 27Uber’s‘ArrivingNow’&Airbnb’s‘Pineapple’ Uber’s ‘Arriving Now’& Airbnb’s ‘Pineapple’ Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Business – A force for good Digital privacyIndex Building ecosystems
  28. 28. The potential benefits of introducing a magazine are exciting. The concept has been around in the airline industry for both. It’s a natural next step for Uber and Airbnb, to help their communities explore their own city or cities they are traveling to. And it gives brands an avenue to reach Uber andAirbnb’s savvy much-coveted customer base. While this is Uber’s firstever in-car magazines for customers,it isn’t the firsttime the company has ventured into content publishing. In March this year, Uber rolled out Momentum – a quarterly magazine forits drivers. An employee communication of sorts,Momentum contains articles on health & wellness, information about the new Uber-city Austin, as well as tips froma seasoned Uber driver. But’s worth noting – that Airbnb hasn’t launched a second edition yet. This could imply the experiment didn’t meet expectations – especially considering Airbnb’s Pineapple was launched a year ago. It will be interesting to see how Arriving Now pans out for Uber. Photo:Airbnb 28Uber’s;Arriving Now’&Airbnb’s‘Pineapple’ Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Business – A force for good Digital privacyIndex Building ecosystems
  29. 29. The primary audience for the magazine is our community around the world who want to experience cities in new ways. It gets under the skin of cities in a way that people really desire these days. Christopher Lukezic Pineapple Publisher Uber’s‘ArrivingNow’&Airbnb’s‘Pineapple’ 29 Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Business – A force for good Digital privacyIndex Building ecosystems
  30. 30. Digital privacy – How much is at stake? Photo:Sebastiaanter Burg on Flickr
  31. 31. 31AshleyMadison Hack The number of high-profile cyber attacks – from Sony Pictures’November 2014 hack to health-insurer Premera Blue Cross’ hack earlier in March 2015 – have been on the rise in the recent past, and seem to be getting more serious with each case. In July this year, another instance of a cyber attack that captured people’s attention globally was the hacking of AshleyMadison, a dating website that caters to married people looking for extramarital affairs. The hackersattackedthe website and stole the company’s user database. Then, they threatened to make it public if owner Avid Life Media didn’t permanently shut down AshleyMadison and its sister website, Established Men. Avid Life Media refused to comply and the hackers leaked more than 25 gigabytes of data on August 18th and August 20th. Sensitive information like name, address, phone numbers and partial credit card details of more than 33 million users were compromised,along with internal company information. via The Guardian Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Business – A force for good Building ecosystemsIndex Digital privacy AshleyMadison Hack
  32. 32. The hack led to AshleyMadison being sued for $500 million in class-action lawsuits by users of the website. A month afterthe leak, AshleyMadison’s CEO Noel Biderman resigned. Rise of the moral digital vigilante The hackerswho call themselves ImpactTeam said that they disapproved of AshleyMadison’s business model of encouraging infidelity by arranging affairs between marriedpeople. They also criticized the company’s policy of charging a $19 fee fromusers forwhat they claim is complete deletion of all data, and failing to actually do so. In their letter,they wrote , “Too bad for those men, they’re cheating dirtbags and deserve no such discretion.Too bad for ALM, you promised secrecy but didn’t deliver.” Several conversation threads on social media seem to echo this sentiment– that people indulging in adultery deserve to have their private lives on display, and that they “had it coming”.Passionate reactions like these fail to consider the larger privacy implications. Can our online footprintremain private? And, does data that we delete actually get deleted permanently? 32AshleyMadison Hack Photo:Barn Imageson Flickr Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Business – A force for good Building ecosystemsIndex Digital privacy
  33. 33. Flirting with data People are increasingly dependent on their smartphonesand devices to communicate and get things done. These devices collect extremely personal data. People willingly part with personal information for convenience and the impression that their information is secure.The recent hacks are increasingly shattering this sense of security, and raising serious questions. The AshleyMadison hack in particular showed that data theftcan lead to more than financial damage – it can affectrelationships, marriages and reputations. Experts predict that cyber attackswill only get worse in the coming years – what will that mean fordata privacy in the future,forcivilians, businesses and governments? Also see : Toronto policereporttwo suicidesassociatedwith AshleyMadisonhackand the EU’s landmarkrulingthatinvalidatesthe Safe Harbordata transferagreementbetween the U.S. and Europe 33AshleyMadison Hack cio.com Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Business – A force for good Building ecosystemsIndex Digital privacy
  34. 34. 34Twitter shuts down Politwoops Twitter shuts down Politwoops Politicians and those serving in public office are expected to be transparent about their activities – and this includes what they say on their social networks. The Sunlight Foundation is a non-profit that promotes transparency in governance and works to make governmentdata available to the public. It launched Politwoops in 2012. Acting as a trackingservice, Politwoops archived the deleted tweets of politicians and diplomats on its website. It accessed these deleted tweets through Twitter’s API. The service covers 30 countries,with the Sunlight Foundation tracking US leaders and the Open State Foundation tracking leaders in 30 other countries. In August 2015, Twitter revoked its API access forthe 30 countries – months afterit revoked access for the US version of Politwoops – citing a violation of its basic user agreement. In its statement,Twitter said, “Honoring the expectationof user privacy for all accounts is a priority for us, whether the user is anonymous or a memberof Congress.” via cityam.com Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Business – A force for good Building ecosystemsIndex Digital privacy
  35. 35. Twitter’s decision to revoke Politwoops’ API access received some criticism.The Sunlight Foundation even released a eulogy forPolitwoops soon afterthe shutdown. The criticism arises fromTwitter’s association as a journalistic tool. Its everything-is-open-here nature is what, in part, led to its mass appeal. By cutting off a service that informs people of statementsthat politicians delete – for whatever reason – Twitter can be seen as going against transparency and accountability. There’s also speculation that this move could be to retain powerful figureson its website, as Twitter struggles to maintain growth of its user base. While it can be argued that Twitter is only staying true to its privacy policies and treating everyone on its website as an equal, there remains the larger question of whether public figures like politicians should have the same privileges as civilians when it comes to privacy on social networks. Getting into a position of political power by default makesindividuals more accountable – and being scrutinized foreverything they say comes with the power they hold. If a politician wants to delete a tweet because he wants to dissociate himself fromwhat he said, don’t his followers – voters – have the right to know? This also opens up the debate of whether a person can be held accountable forsimply sharing something that a politician has said and later deleted on Twitter.It will be interesting to watch how far Twitter will extend this rule, and how it will handle cases of quotes and screenshots of deleted tweets – which will surely continue across the web. 35Twitter shuts down Politwoops Some deletedtweets on Politwoops Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Business – A force for good Building ecosystemsIndex Digital privacy
  36. 36. What elected politicians publicly say is a matter of public record. Even when tweets are deleted, it’s part of parliamentary history. These tweets were once posted and later deleted. What politicians say in public should be available to anyone. This is not about typos but it is a unique insight on how messages from elected politicians can change without notice. Arjan El Fassed Director, Open State Foundation Twitter shuts down Politwoops 36 Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Business – A force for good Building ecosystemsIndex Digital privacy
  37. 37. Bonus insights from MSLGROUP
  38. 38. The Content Shot highlights one inspiring branded content initiative every week, and identifies reasons for its success. Prepared by the Publicis Consultants Net Intelligenz team in Paris, the newsletter is a great way stay up-to-date – and to practice your French! The latest issue examines the #ConnectedSeries, a crowdsourcing collaboration between Samsung and Vimeo, where 10 filmmakers were invited to create short films that explore creativity through technology. Why is it a success? The project involved artists from within the Vimeo community, and gave them the creative freedom to express themselves. A Tumblr launch ensured relevant visibility within the social community. #ConnectedSeries explores the relation between technology and social connectedness with stories that capture people’s imagination. 38TheContent Shot The Content Shot Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Business – A force for good Building ecosystemsIndex Digital privacy The Content Shot isavailable as an emailnewsletterin French. Viewthe archiveand signup here.
  39. 39. People’s Insights is a collection of inspiring initiatives, insights and foresights shared by MSLGROUP’s SPRINTers – our global team of 100+ strategic planners, researchers and insights experts. People’s Insights covers the latest trends in engagement on both consumer and corporate sides. We feature the best of these initiatives as People’s Insights monthly briefs, and original insights and foresights – from our SPRINTers and other MSLGROUP experts - in our People’s Insights reports. We share these on our social platforms and distribute freely to inspire more engaging campaigns. Check out our latest report, Data In. Data Out. Transforming Big Data into Smart Ideas. * People’s Insights is available as a blog, powerpoint decks, infographics, white papers and magazines, a Kindle eBook and even an iPad app. Follow us on Twitter at @PeoplesLab or subscribe to our newsletter to receive our monthly briefs and quarterly magazines. 39About People’sInsights About People’s Insights Introduction About People’s Insights Bonus insights Business – A force for good Building ecosystemsIndex Digital privacy
  40. 40. Thank you! 40 For more, visit: peopleslab.mslgroup.com/peoplesinsights

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