Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Workplace environment computer_comfort

Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Upcoming SlideShare
Office Ergonomic Training
Office Ergonomic Training
Loading in …3
×

Check these out next

1 of 67 Ad
Advertisement

More Related Content

Advertisement

More from Shankar Myadharaveni (20)

Advertisement

Workplace environment computer_comfort

  1. 1. Computer Comfort
  2. 2. Work-Related MSDs
  3. 3. Work-Related MSDs Musculoskeletal disorders, or MSDs, are the most common and expensive workplace injuries.
  4. 4. Work-Related MSDs MSDs are injuries of the muscles, nerves, tendons, ligaments, joints, cartilage and spinal disks.
  5. 5. Work-Related MSDs • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome • Tendinitis • Sciatica • Herniated Disk • Lower Back Pain
  6. 6. Work-Related MSDs MSDs are preventable.
  7. 7. Understanding Neutral Postures
  8. 8. Neutral Postures Ergonomics is the science of fitting the job to the worker.
  9. 9. Neutral Postures Since everyone is different, tools and work areas need to be adjusted to fit each individual.
  10. 10. Neutral Postures Good posture incorporates proper alignment of the bones, balanced use of the muscles and ease of movement.
  11. 11. Neutral Postures Neutral postures give us more strength and endurance.
  12. 12. Neutral Postures To minimize risk of developing MSDs, maintain neutral posture and avoid extreme postures.
  13. 13. Neutral Postures Fit your tools and workplace to your body size.
  14. 14. Cumulative Trauma Disorders
  15. 15. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most widely known form of cumulative trauma disorder.
  16. 16. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome The carpal tunnel is the opening in the hand between the transverse carpal ligament and the wrist bones.
  17. 17. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Potential causes are repetitive motion, such as typing, or poor positioning of wrist while working.
  18. 18. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Symptoms include pain or numbness in the hand, sometimes progressing to the shoulder or even neck.
  19. 19. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Can result in permanent weakness in the hand and muscular atrophy.
  20. 20. Spine and Back Injuries Result from sitting for long periods.
  21. 21. Spine and Back Injuries Result from poor posture and incorrect seating at the computer.
  22. 22. Spine and Back Injuries Use your chair correctly, move your body and ergonomically position all equipment.
  23. 23. Customizing Your Workstation
  24. 24. Workstation • Support feet • Keep hips higher than knees • Bend elbows
  25. 25. Workstation • Don’t reach out • Keep print at eye level • Keep eyes straight ahead • Don’t tip or lift chin
  26. 26. Workstation Place your keyboard with upper arms relaxed, and bend elbows at 90 degrees.
  27. 27. Workstation Adjust the height of desk or keyboard tray and use a footrest.
  28. 28. Workstation Top of monitor should be eye level.
  29. 29. Workstation Eye to monitor should be arm’s length – 16 to 32 inches.
  30. 30. Workstation Copyholder should be at arm’s length.
  31. 31. Workstation Lights shouldn’t be so bright that they compete with monitor.
  32. 32. Workstation To eliminate glare, place the monitor 90 degrees from the window and adjust the blinds.
  33. 33. Workstation Shine task lights on documents, not the screen.
  34. 34. Workstation Use low-wattage bulb.
  35. 35. Adjusting Your Chair
  36. 36. Chair When your chair is properly adjusted, your muscles and ligaments properly support the alignment of your spine and body.
  37. 37. Chair Vary chair angles and sitting postures throughout the day.
  38. 38. Chair Support feet on the floor and find the lever that controls the chair height.
  39. 39. Chair Adjust the chair so your hips are higher than your knees.
  40. 40. Chair Match height of backrest so curve matches your back.
  41. 41. Chair Armrests should barely touch arms.
  42. 42. Chair Experiment with different angles on backrest and seat pan.
  43. 43. Chair Every couple of hours, move the chair a few degrees forward and then a few back.
  44. 44. Chair Getting up from your chair frequently to stand and stretch can also be helpful.
  45. 45. Using Keyboard and Mouse
  46. 46. Keyboard and Mouse Proper keyboard and mouse techniques will soothe your muscles, tendons and joints.
  47. 47. Keyboard Keep your wrists straight and flatten the back legs on the keyboard.
  48. 48. Keyboard Your wrists should hover or float above the wristrest and armrests when you’re keying.
  49. 49. Keyboard Use the rest only when you pause in your work.
  50. 50. Keyboard Practice a very light keystroke with your curved, relaxed fingers moving fluidly over the keys.
  51. 51. Keyboard Take care not to overreach and overstretch your fingers.
  52. 52. Mouse Position the mouse at the same height and distance as the keyboard.
  53. 53. Mouse Move the mouse with shoulder motions – not wrist deviations.
  54. 54. Mouse Don’t squeeze the mouse; hold it very lightly and relax any unnecessary tension in the fingers.
  55. 55. Mouse Clean the mouse ball every so often.
  56. 56. Tips and Techniques
  57. 57. Tips and Techniques Take frequent mini-breaks.
  58. 58. Tips and Techniques Learn to listen to your body.
  59. 59. Tips and Techniques Focus on a distant object every 20 to 30 minutes.
  60. 60. Tips and Techniques Stand and stretch frequently.
  61. 61. Tips and Techniques Stand with both feet firmly and evenly planted on the ground.
  62. 62. Tips and Techniques Vary tasks as much as possible throughout the day.
  63. 63. Tips and Techniques Use a phone book to raise monitor to correct height.
  64. 64. Tips and Techniques Use eraser to raise front edge of keyboard.
  65. 65. Tips and Techniques Support feet on a 3-inch binder.
  66. 66. Tips and Techniques Use cardboard to make a monitor hood to prevent glare on screen.
  67. 67. Computer Comfort

×