The Man Behind the Myth WebQuest

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My WebQuest for EDUC331

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The Man Behind the Myth WebQuest

  1. 1. The Man behind the Myth Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Designed for an 11 th and 12 th grade English classroom by Mike Dixon [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page A WebQuest on Joseph Campbell and the ‘Mythic Story Structure’
  2. 2. Introduction Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] The night is silent before the approach of a new day. You sit at your computer - an aspiring writer staring at a blank screen . You’ve just finished your most recent piece of work, printed it out, read it over, and promptly discarded it into the nearest waste can. Amidst your frustration and anxiety, you begin to wonder what exactly constitutes a “good” story. You begin to think of great storytellers – Shakespeare, Spielberg, Hemmingway, Hawthorne, and many others – surely there’s some sort of secret formula which will transform you to their likes. Perhaps it was the fact that it was the middle of the night or the continued begging of an unfed stomach, but before you know it, your Muse – your inner voice – has appeared on your desk in human form and says to you: “Cheer up chum, I’ve got just the thing for you.” Your Muse hands you your shoes, tells you to resist the urge of some much needed sleep, and takes you into the waning moments of night. “If you listen closely, you’ll be writing a masterpiece before the sun shows its ugly face.” Your Muse leads you to the local library (why the doors weren’t locked remains unsolved), and sits you down before a picture of a common-looking man. “This man will answer all of your questions if you give him a chance. Now read up and let your zzzzz’s slip away for he’s the father of storytelling and the mythic riddles that puzzle your brain. His name is Joseph Campbell and he’ll teach you to write like the greats which you admire…”
  3. 3. Task Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] <ul><li>As your Muse has suggested, you’ll be studying the likes of the great Joseph Campbell and answering the following questions: </li></ul><ul><li>Briefly describe who Joseph Campbell was and how his work may impact an aspiring storyteller. </li></ul><ul><li>What are the stages of the ‘mythic story structure’ or ‘hero’s journey’? Go into detail and better describe three of the stages. </li></ul><ul><li>Give three examples of where the ‘mythic story structure’ might be observed (e.g. in literature, film, plays, poems, etc.). </li></ul><ul><li>Describe some of the functions that a ‘Hero’ fulfills in context of story-telling. Talk about the psychological function ‘Heroes’ play within society. </li></ul><ul><li>Once you’ve collected your research and discovered the great mysteries of Joseph Campbell, you will find yourself inspired to ignore your heavy eyelids and begin crafting your first masterpiece. With the help of your Muse, you’ll create (or join) a group of 3-5 people in the class and you’ll collaborate in the creation of a play which loosely follows the major stages of the ‘mythic story structure’. Each person in your group should help craft the play as well as play at least one character in the play when you present it before your peers. </li></ul>Title
  4. 4. Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] <ul><li>Before you’re able to answer some of your Muse’s challenging questions, you must first gaze into the picture that sits before you and find out who exactly Joseph Campbell was. </li></ul><ul><li>Now that you’ve read up on the biographic importance of Joseph Campbell, your Muse hands you a book which will explain the gears and cogs behind Campbell’s idea of the ‘Mythic Story Structure’. The book is broken up into three chapters: Separation , Initiation , and Return . </li></ul><ul><li>Once you’ve finished reading the book, your Muse gives you a cup of coffee and lectures you on the functions of a hero. You listen carefully and take good notes. </li></ul><ul><li>Your Muse stops talking as the horizon starts to show the light of morning. It’s time to leave the library before others show up and return to your study. As you make your way home, your Muse asks you some questions (on the ‘Task’ page) to make sure you’ve learned all that you need in order to create a masterpiece. Answer them on a sheet of paper and turn them in to your Muse (teacher) . </li></ul><ul><li>You return to your house and your Muse immediately instructs you to begin on your first masterpiece while the information you’ve gathered is fresh. Create a group of 3-5 people and write a play which loosely follows the structure of the mythic story. As you complete your play, your Muse will request a performance. You’ll act out your brilliant piece of work in front of your Muse (and the rest of the class) . Each person in your group should play a role in the performance. </li></ul><ul><li>After all of this, your Muse smiles and congratulates you, finally allowing you to get some much needed rest. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Evaluation Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Your Muse will grade you on your answers as follows: Your Muse will grade you on your performance as follows: CATEGORY 5 3 1 0 EFFORT Your answers are strong and demonstrate that you understand the material you've researched. Your answers are sufficient and demonstrate that you have a good understanding of the material you've researched. Your answers show limited effort and demonstrate a developing understanding of the material you've researched. Your answers are incomplete and demonstrate that you have little to no understanding of the material you've researched. CONVENTIONS You make no errors in grammar or spelling. There are a few errors in grammar or spelling. There are several errors in grammar or spelling. There are tons of errors in grammar or spelling. CATEGORY 5 3 1 0 Presentation All actors / actresses were extremely enthusiastic and played their parts well. The acting was above average and everyone played their part well. The acting was average and not everybody played their part with effort. The acting was below average and not everybody played their part with effort. Writing Excellent structure and story. No grammatical errors. Clear and coherent structure and story. Very few grammatical errors. Cloudy structure and story. Grammatical errors can be found throughout. Hard to find the structure and story. Grammatical errors everywhere. Content Incorporates all of the elements related to the mythic story structure. Incorporates many of the elements related to the mythic story structure. Incorporates some of the elements related to the mythic story structure. Doesn't incorporate any of the elements of the mythic story structure. Collaboration with Peers Group was always on task and dedicated to the assignment. Group members helped each other out and carried a positive attitude. Group was mostly on task and dedicated to the assignment. Group members helped each other out and carried a good attitude. Group was hardly on task and didn't display good dedication to the assignment. Group members worked independently and carried an average attitude. Group was never on task and had no dedication for the assignment. Group members wouldn't help each other out and carried a poor attitude.
  6. 6. Conclusion Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] As you go to bed, your Muse disappears and you begin to wonder if your twilight journey to the library really happened or not. Perhaps this was all a dream and you’d awaken slumped over the desk where you do all of your writing. But again, perhaps not. Regardless of what was happening in the dream world or not, you feel satisfied to have made a connection with the father of modern myth, Joseph Campbell. You’ve discovered the path of the hero’s journey – the mythic story structure – and come to terms with the secrets behind the deeds of all good heroes. It is with these thoughts that you drift away or continue on in the world of dreams. For more mythic information, check out these additional web pages: - four functions of myth - more details on Campbell’s life - living mythic lives - Campbell & Jung - hero’s journey outlines
  7. 7. Credits & References Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Web Pages: http://www.jcf.org/about_jc.php?PHPSESSID=bd0546991ce229887f832d4691d51bcc http://www.folkstory.com/campbell/riverside.html http://www.folkstory.com/campbell/scholars_life.html http://mythosandlogos.com/Campbell.html http://www.mythichero.com/what_is_mythology.htm http://www.moongadget.com/origins/myth.html http://www.wiu.edu/users/mudjs1/separation.htm http://www.wiu.edu/users/mudjs1/initiation.htm http://www.wiu.edu/users/mudjs1/return.htm http://www.ericdigests.org/2004-1/heroes.htm Photographs: Poseidon by azrainman on Flickr via Creative Commons Cauvery by trex’s photostream on Flickr via Creative Commons Thank you to the people who put together the websites above and a big thank you to azrainman and trex’s photostream for allowing the use of your wonderful photographs! The WebQuest Page The WebQuest Slideshare Group
  8. 8. The Man behind the Myth (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest on Joseph Campbell and the ‘Mythic Story Structure’ Designed for an 11 th and 12 th grade English classroom by Mike Dixon [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  9. 9. Introduction (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This WebQuest was developed to meet the expected requirements of an education class (ED331) at Colorado State University. The class focuses on the teaching of technology in the classroom and this WebQuest met one of several expected requirements for the course. This WebQuest is about the general biographical account of Joseph Campbell’s life and the general outline of Campbell’s carefully crafted ‘mythic story structure’ or ‘hero’s journey’ and the character archetypes which accompany this structure / journey (specifically the Hero archetype). This WebQuest should help students gain an understanding of how mythic theory can influence the telling of stories across a variety of time periods. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  10. 10. Learners (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is designed for an 11 th or 12 th grade English or Film Studies classroom. The students should have prior introductory storytelling elements and techniques taught to them before the beginning of this lesson. Students should have a firm grasp of what elements such as: plot, theme, protagonist, antagonist, etc. are prior to the teaching of this lesson. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  11. 11. Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Reading and Writing Standards Addressed: Standard 1: Students read and understand a variety of materials (1.1, 1.2, 1.3) Standard 2: Students write and speak for a variety of purposes and audiences (2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6) Standard 3: Students write and speak using conventional grammar, usage, sentence structure, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling (3.1, 3.2, 3.4) Standard 4: Students apply thinking skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing (4.2, 4.4, 4.5) Standard 5: Students read to locate, select, and make use of relevant information from a variety of media, reference, and technological sources (5.5) Standard 6: Students read and recognize literature as a record of human experience (6.3) This WebQuest should encourage thinking and communication skills among students as they will be required to collaborate with one another in the creation of the final product. It should also promote critical thinking as well as teamwork and compromise. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  12. 12. The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page <ul><li>The online portion of the WebQuest should take students 1-2 days to complete, where as the creation and presentation of the final product should take students an additional 2-3 days to complete. As far as assigning groups is concerned, whether students choose their group members or whether it is done for them is up to the teacher implementing this lesson. The teacher needs to be a good moderator during this lesson and will not need any complex skills to carry it out. For the lesson itself, here are the process steps provided for the students: </li></ul><ul><li>Before you’re able to answer some of your Muse’s challenging questions, you must first gaze into the picture that sits before you and find out who exactly Joseph Campbell was. </li></ul><ul><li>Now that you’ve read up on the biographic importance of Joseph Campbell, your Muse hands you a book which will explain the gears and cogs behind Campbell’s idea of the ‘Mythic Story Structure’. The book is broken up into three chapters: Separation , Initiation , and Return . </li></ul><ul><li>Once you’ve finished reading the book, your Muse gives you a cup of coffee and lectures you on the functions of a hero. You listen carefully and take good notes. </li></ul><ul><li>Your Muse stops talking as the horizon starts to show the light of morning. It’s time to leave the library before others show up and return to your study. As you make your way home, your Muse asks you some questions (on the ‘Task’ page) to make sure you’ve learned all that you need in order to create a masterpiece. Answer them on a sheet of paper and turn them in to your Muse (teacher) . </li></ul><ul><li>You return to your house and your Muse immediately instructs you to begin on your first masterpiece while the information you’ve gathered is fresh. Create a group of 3-5 people and write a play which loosely follows the structure of the mythic story. As you complete your play, your Muse will request a performance. You’ll act out your brilliant piece of work in front of your Muse (and the rest of the class) . Each person in your group should play a role in the performance. </li></ul><ul><li>After all of this, your Muse smiles and congratulates you, finally allowing you to get some much needed rest. </li></ul>Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  13. 13. Resources (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson can be carried out by one teacher. A unique idea would be to collaborate with another teacher and combine classes to complete this WebQuest and adjusting each group size to 6-8 students. The teacher will need 1-2 days worth of time in their school’s media center as each student should have access to a computer in order to complete the first portion of the WebQuest independently. Paper and writing materials may be needed for students to craft their play on, and an appropriate space to present their plays will be needed at the end of this lesson. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  14. 14. Evaluation (TEACHER) Teacher Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [Student Page] Your Muse will grade you on your answers as follows: Your Muse will grade you on your performance as follows: CATEGORY 5 3 1 0 EFFORT Your answers are strong and demonstrate that you understand the material you've researched. Your answers are sufficient and demonstrate that you have a good understanding of the material you've researched. Your answers show limited effort and demonstrate a developing understanding of the material you've researched. Your answers are incomplete and demonstrate that you have little to no understanding of the material you've researched. CONVENTIONS You make no errors in grammar or spelling. There are a few errors in grammar or spelling. There are several errors in grammar or spelling. There are tons of errors in grammar or spelling. CATEGORY 5 3 1 0 Presentation All actors / actresses were extremely enthusiastic and played their parts well. The acting was above average and everyone played their part well. The acting was average and not everybody played their part with effort. The acting was below average and not everybody played their part with effort. Writing Excellent structure and story. No grammatical errors. Clear and coherent structure and story. Very few grammatical errors. Cloudy structure and story. Grammatical errors can be found throughout. Hard to find the structure and story. Grammatical errors everywhere. Content Incorporates all of the elements related to the mythic story structure. Incorporates many of the elements related to the mythic story structure. Incorporates some of the elements related to the mythic story structure. Doesn't incorporate any of the elements of the mythic story structure. Collaboration with Peers Group was always on task and dedicated to the assignment. Group members helped each other out and carried a positive attitude. Group was mostly on task and dedicated to the assignment. Group members helped each other out and carried a good attitude. Group was hardly on task and didn't display good dedication to the assignment. Group members worked independently and carried an average attitude. Group was never on task and had no dedication for the assignment. Group members wouldn't help each other out and carried a poor attitude.
  15. 15. Teacher Script (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page <ul><li>As the facilitator of this lesson, here is the step-by-step script to stay close to: </li></ul><ul><li>Explain to your students what a WebQuest is and what the timetable for this lesson is. </li></ul><ul><li>Take your students to your school’s media center so they can begin work on their WebQuest independently. This should take an entire class period, maybe two depending on the size of your class and how much time you have for each class period. During this first day (or two), you’ll simply be moderating your students and helping with any technological concerns they may have. </li></ul><ul><li>After the initial stage of this lesson, you should create groups or allow students to create their own groups and begin work on the writing of their play based on what they learned during their WebQuest. This should take one day. You should again be moderating to make sure each group is on task. </li></ul><ul><li>Once each group has completed their plays, they should be able to practice presenting it (act it out). This should also take an entire class period and you may want to let students work in the hallway or other places where their peers won’t be able to see their performance before the final day. Again, you will be moderating to ensure that each group is staying on task. </li></ul><ul><li>On the final day, each group will be presenting in front of the class and you will be completing evaluations based on their performances. If there is enough time after the performances, you should lead a class discussion on the importance of the mythic story structure as it pertains to story telling. </li></ul>Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  16. 16. Conclusion (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page As a writer and future teacher, I’ve always wondered what made a successful story. There are many different thoughts and suggestions depending on whom you turn to for an answer, but for me, it was only when I discovered the wonderful work of Joseph Campbell that I really began to grasp what exactly a story is and how we can even begin to construct it. In my opinion, we need to be teaching our students how to become successful story-tellers when they are still in grade school. The work of Joseph Campbell usually remains hidden to most high school level students until after they’ve graduated and stumbled across his writing theory in a college-type atmosphere. I’ve created this WebQuest as a kind of introduction to the life of Joseph Campbell and the general concepts behind many of his complex observations so that high school students could interact with it and perhaps develop their ability to become better writers before graduating from grade school. My hope is that many teachers will find this WebQuest to be useful and perhaps entertain the thought of using it or implementing it in their classrooms. Modifications to this WebQuest are very welcome, my goal was to provide a template for a lesson about Joseph Campbell and the mythic story structure so that the life and work of Joseph Campbell can be celebrated in a high school setting. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  17. 17. Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Web Pages: http://www.jcf.org/about_jc.php?PHPSESSID=bd0546991ce229887f832d4691d51bcc http://www.folkstory.com/campbell/riverside.html http://www.folkstory.com/campbell/scholars_life.html http://mythosandlogos.com/Campbell.html http://www.mythichero.com/what_is_mythology.htm http://www.moongadget.com/origins/myth.html http://www.wiu.edu/users/mudjs1/separation.htm http://www.wiu.edu/users/mudjs1/initiation.htm http://www.wiu.edu/users/mudjs1/return.htm http://www.ericdigests.org/2004-1/heroes.htm Photographs: Poseidon by azrainman on Flickr via Creative Commons Cauvery by trex’s photostream on Flickr via Creative Commons Thank you to the people who put together the websites above and a big thank you to azrainman and trex’s photostream for allowing the use of your wonderful photographs! The WebQuest Page The WebQuest Slideshare Group Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion

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