News Values

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An introduction to News Values

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News Values

  1. 1. News Values Journalism A journalist is someone who reports “the news,” but how does he or she determine what that is? Editors must determine what stories to run, but how do they choose what is most important? Both start by identifying the “news values” of a story or topic. Sometimes called “news criteria,” these identify what makes the story “valuable” as “news” for the audience.
  2. 2. News Values Journalism <ul><li>HARD NEWS </li></ul><ul><li>These are the “traditional” news values we think of when we think of journalism. </li></ul><ul><li>Timeliness: Deals with issues/topics of current concern. It is happening “now,” making it “news.” </li></ul><ul><li>Prominence: Importance or significance of person place, or thing discussed. It is newsworthy based on the fact that we recognize the name. </li></ul><ul><li>Proximity: Nearness of an event to audience; how “close to home” the story hits. </li></ul><ul><li>Consequence: Number of people involved or affected; the sheer number of people impacted by the story. </li></ul><ul><li>Harold, John R. and Lois a Stanciak. Making News: An Introduction to Journalism. Portland, Maine: J. Weston Walch, 1988. </li></ul>
  3. 3. News Values Journalism <ul><li>HUMAN INTEREST </li></ul><ul><li>These values appeal to our feelings, the things that draw us in at an emotional level. </li></ul><ul><li>Conflict: The clash of opposing ideas or interests. One of the most prevalent news values, this reflects any idea that has multiple viewpoints or perspectives. </li></ul><ul><li>Oddity: Unusual, unique, offbeat topics, a subject that sticks out because it is not something seen every day. </li></ul><ul><li>Emotions: Stories that draw on universal feelings like joy, sadness, or shock, anything from “Aw, shucks,” to “OMG!” </li></ul><ul><li>Drama: Heightened conflict that is caused by or creates extreme emotions (can become sensational) </li></ul><ul><li>Harold, John R. and Lois a Stanciak. Making News: An Introduction to Journalism. Portland, Maine: J. Weston Walch, 1988. </li></ul>

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