Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
The Canterbury Tales Geoffrey Chaucer By: Carolyn Marrone and Dale Eggert The Reeve’s Tale
The Reeve, Oswald <ul><li>Physical Characteristics, Clothing, Accessories </li></ul><ul><li>Old, choleric, thin “stick leg...
The Reeve <ul><li>Middle Class </li></ul><ul><li>Common-man , under the rule of a master, learned a useful trade (carpentr...
The Tale  The Reeve’s Tale <ul><li>Main Characters </li></ul><ul><li>The Miller : “Simpkin the Swagger”. He is a jealous a...
Plot synopsis Exposition : Miller and His wife live with their two children at the mill in Trumpington.  The Miller and hi...
Theme <ul><li>The theme of the Reeve’s tale is simple:  </li></ul><ul><li>“ What goes around comes around” </li></ul><ul><...
Classification of the Tale <ul><li>Genre of the Tale:   </li></ul><ul><li>Fabliau (fab-lee-oh) A story based on clever tri...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

The Reeves Tale

9,204 views

Published on

The Reeves Tale

  1. 1. The Canterbury Tales Geoffrey Chaucer By: Carolyn Marrone and Dale Eggert The Reeve’s Tale
  2. 2. The Reeve, Oswald <ul><li>Physical Characteristics, Clothing, Accessories </li></ul><ul><li>Old, choleric, thin “stick legs” </li></ul><ul><li>Closely shaven beard, hair stopped above his ears. </li></ul><ul><li>Wore a blue overcoat </li></ul><ul><li>Rode a dapple-grey (named Scot) </li></ul><ul><li>Had a rusty blade on his side </li></ul><ul><li>Words, Experiences, and Personality Traits </li></ul><ul><li>Rich but Cheap (kept money tucked away) </li></ul><ul><li>wise </li></ul><ul><li>People beneath him were afraid of him. </li></ul><ul><li>Carpenter of first-rate skill </li></ul><ul><li>Could tell how well his crops would grow by observing the weather patterns. </li></ul><ul><li>He rode in the back of the pack on their journey </li></ul>
  3. 3. The Reeve <ul><li>Middle Class </li></ul><ul><li>Common-man , under the rule of a master, learned a useful trade (carpentry) </li></ul><ul><li>Inferences </li></ul><ul><li>Chaucer states that “he could judge by watching drought and rain/The yield he might expect from seed and grain” </li></ul><ul><li>Chaucer makes reference to the Reeve’s “master” </li></ul><ul><li>Chaucer also states that the Reeve “had been under contract to present/The accounts, right from his master’s earliest years.” </li></ul><ul><li>Chaucer makes the Reeve seem like an ordinary middle class citizen. “He had a lovely dwelling on a heath” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Heath: a tract of uncultivated, open land, with infertile, sandy soil, covered with grasses and weeds. </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. The Tale The Reeve’s Tale <ul><li>Main Characters </li></ul><ul><li>The Miller : “Simpkin the Swagger”. He is a jealous and corrupt man who has a penchant for stealing. He plays the bagpipes and he is very protective of his wife. </li></ul><ul><li>Miller’s wife : (unnamed) nobly born, father was the Parson of the town. Educated in a nunnery </li></ul><ul><li>Molly : the Miller’s 20 year old daughter. “plump, well-grown, but had pretty hair.” (Other than her hair, she was ugly) </li></ul><ul><li>Unnamed and genderless child in a cradl e : the couple’s youngest child. </li></ul><ul><li>Alan and John : two young, gullible students from Cambridge University. They devise a plan to expose that the Miller is a thief. </li></ul><ul><li>Setting </li></ul><ul><li>A Mill in Trumpington, not far from Cambridge town. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Plot synopsis Exposition : Miller and His wife live with their two children at the mill in Trumpington. The Miller and his family are visited by two students from Cambridge, John and Alan. Rising Actions : While the students were grinding their corn at the mill, the Miller set their horses free While the two boys were looking for their horses, the Miller stole half of their cornmeal. The two boys finally found their horses and the Miller invited them to stay the night . To get back at the Miller for stealing their cornmeal, Alan has sex with Molly all night long while everyone is sleeping. Out of Jealousy, John moved the baby cradle to the foot of his bed so that when the Miller’s wife got up un the middle of the night, she would get into bed with him. John had sex with the Miller’ s wife. “Till the third morning cock began to sing” Molly told Alan where the cake was with their cornmeal baked into it . Climax : Alan crawls into bed with the Miller since there was no cradle at the foot of his bed. Thinking it was John, he tries to wake him up and whispers in his ear “ Get ready to leave, I have been having sex with Molly all night!” The Miller Punched Alan in the face and made him bleed. The Miller tripped and fell on his wife. His wife thought that she was in bed with her husband and thought that the two students were fighting. She beat her husband, thinking it was Alan, with a stick and he fell to the ground. Conclusion : The two boys ran off with their cornmeal and their horses. “Do evil and be done by as you did” Falling Actions:
  6. 6. Theme <ul><li>The theme of the Reeve’s tale is simple: </li></ul><ul><li>“ What goes around comes around” </li></ul><ul><li>The Miller was a thief and stole from the two boys. In return, he ends up getting beat with a stick by his own wife! </li></ul><ul><li>Other themes include: trickery, deceit, revenge, theft, and satisfying guilty pleasures. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Classification of the Tale <ul><li>Genre of the Tale: </li></ul><ul><li>Fabliau (fab-lee-oh) A story based on clever tricks involving infidelity(disloyalty). </li></ul><ul><li>Supporting evidence for classification </li></ul><ul><li>This tale is a fabliau because revolves around deceitful tricks . John and Alan have sex with the Miller’s wife and daughter to get back at him for stealing their cornmeal. </li></ul><ul><li>The Miller is a disloyal man, therefore he pays for his actions in the end of the story when he gets beat by his own wife. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Cradle swapping” </li></ul><ul><li>Source of the tale </li></ul><ul><li>The Flemish Een bispel van .ij. clerken , a derivative of Jean Bodel's Old French De Gombert et des deux clers, is a likely source for the Reeve's Tale . </li></ul><ul><li>Contemporary Counterparts: </li></ul><ul><li>This story is the perfect example of the saying “what goes around comes around” </li></ul><ul><li>Much like the popular shows of today (Desperate Housewives, Sex and the City, and Degrassi) Sex is a big theme. </li></ul><ul><li>Desperate Housewives is full of deceit and trickery as well as disloyalty and “bed-hopping” </li></ul>

×