What comes to mind
when you think
about money?
Don’t start with the money!
Remember him?
If you don’t TAKE NOTES
over what you learn--if you don’t
write it down, review it, think
about it, Tweet it, or talk abou...
Why do people love
sports, arts,
service, & starting
businesses?
At their best, they are done WITH people...
FOR people.
How does this compare & contrast
with the way schools are operated?
Schools are sometimes about working
WITH people, but only rarely FOR people.
Current model = a selfish pursuit of learning
Schools are also at their best, when students
get to learn WITH people FOR people.
Innovation Partner
Domenico Bobby
Stephano Gisella
Augusto Daniela
Gonzalo Karen
Pedro Andrea
Carolina Sara
Paolo Kathy
Sc...
START WITH THE WHY - THE PURPOSE - THE VISION
CONSCIOUS CAPITALISM
CONSCIOUS LEARNING
Why School?
“People don’t buy what
you do, they buy why
you do it.”
Image credit: iStockPhoto
Imagine being Ryan Hreljac's first grade teacher. After telling your class of six- and seven-yea...
revealed that all of them came to their purpose through people outside their immediate families -- people that
included th...
This next video was also used to induce awe in the lab and could be used for units on sustainability, nature
photo/videogr...
EDUTOPIA WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION © 2013 The George Lucas Educational Foundation All rights reserved.
about purpose.
Helpin...
Why Learn?
“People don’t buy what
you do, they buy why
you do it.”
Why Innovation Academy?
“People don’t buy what
you do, they buy why
you do it.”
7/31/13 30 Example Vision Statements - Top Nonprofits
topnonprofits.com/examples/vision-statements/ 1/3
Contact  |  Sponso...
7/31/13 30 Example Vision Statements - Top Nonprofits
topnonprofits.com/examples/vision-statements/ 2/3
RECENT  POSTS
Nonp...
Possible Mission Statements:
“People don’t buy what
you do, they buy why
you do it.”
We learn & work
with people for peopl...
CULTURE OF A
BUSINESS
7/31/13 Strong Company Culture Predicts Long-Term Success | Fox Small Business Center
smallbusiness.foxbusiness.com/legal-...
7/31/13 Strong Company Culture Predicts Long-Term Success | Fox Small Business Center
smallbusiness.foxbusiness.com/legal-...
RULES?
CULTURE OF
INNOVATION
EMPOWERMENT & RULES
EMPOWERMENT & RULES
EMPOWERMENT
EMPOWERMENT
CREATIVITY
CULTURE
CULTURE
CULTURE OF THE
INNOVATION ACADEMY
What type of culture
do we want to create?
This is true in
education too! Being
self-disciplined and
self-motivated is KEY!
7/31/13 Six Components of a Great Corporate Culture - John Coleman - Harvard Business Review
blogs.hbr.org/cs/2013/05/six_...
7/31/13 Six Components of a Great Corporate Culture - John Coleman - Harvard Business Review
blogs.hbr.org/cs/2013/05/six_...
7/31/13 Six Components of a Great Corporate Culture - John Coleman - Harvard Business Review
blogs.hbr.org/cs/2013/05/six_...
When should you work to change a culture,
and when should you respect a culture?
Positive & negative
consequences
for behavior?
Focused
7/31/13 College teaches one class at a time - USATODAY.com
usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/nation/2007-10-28-3162440689_x.htm...
7/31/13 Cornell College
www.thinkindependently.com/take-a-tour/8-cornell_college.aspx 1/2
Cornell  College
Location:  Moun...
7/31/13 Cornell College
www.thinkindependently.com/take-a-tour/8-cornell_college.aspx 2/2
I  get  the  close  relationship...
Media &
Communication
Randy Scherer
August
5th-7th
Project-based Learning Workshops
Monday Tuesday Wednesday
8 - 3:30
Innovation
Academy
8 - 3:3...
August
5th-7th
Project-based Learning Workshops
“The greatest effects
on student learning
occur when teachers
become learn...
“Transformed by Technology
and Project-Based Learning:
High Tech High”
August
5th-7th
Project-based Learning Workshops
“The purpose for tech in
High Tech High is not for
consumption, it’s for
production.”
- Larry Rosenstock,
CEO of High Tech...
“We want kids behaving like
scientists, and behaving like
photographers, and
behaving like graphic
artists.”
- Larry Rosen...
Randy Scherer
August
5th-7th
Project-based Learning Workshops
Monday Tuesday Wednesday
8 - 3:30
Innovation
Academy
8 - 3:3...
nnovative
Independent
roject
P
Alan Watts
“What do I desire?”
Start by:
LOOKING FOR
PROBLEMS IN
OUR COMMUNITY
THAT YOU CAN
HELP SOLVE.
THEN:
SEE IF YOU CAN
UTILIZE ONE OF
YOUR SKILLS OR
PASSIONS TO
HELP SOLVE IT
FINALLY:
SEARCH FOR A
MENTOR OR AN
ORGANIZATION
THAT YOU CAN
HELP AND LEARN
FROM IN THE
PROCESS
DEADLINE:
AUGUST 12th
Day 1 - Start with the WHY (readings, texts, and slides)
Day 1 - Start with the WHY (readings, texts, and slides)
Day 1 - Start with the WHY (readings, texts, and slides)
Day 1 - Start with the WHY (readings, texts, and slides)
Day 1 - Start with the WHY (readings, texts, and slides)
Day 1 - Start with the WHY (readings, texts, and slides)
Day 1 - Start with the WHY (readings, texts, and slides)
Day 1 - Start with the WHY (readings, texts, and slides)
Day 1 - Start with the WHY (readings, texts, and slides)
Day 1 - Start with the WHY (readings, texts, and slides)
Day 1 - Start with the WHY (readings, texts, and slides)
Day 1 - Start with the WHY (readings, texts, and slides)
Day 1 - Start with the WHY (readings, texts, and slides)
Day 1 - Start with the WHY (readings, texts, and slides)
Day 1 - Start with the WHY (readings, texts, and slides)
Day 1 - Start with the WHY (readings, texts, and slides)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Day 1 - Start with the WHY (readings, texts, and slides)

1,826 views

Published on

Day 1 lesson plan for the Roosevelt Innovation Academy.

Published in: Education, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Day 1 - Start with the WHY (readings, texts, and slides)

  1. 1. What comes to mind when you think about money?
  2. 2. Don’t start with the money!
  3. 3. Remember him?
  4. 4. If you don’t TAKE NOTES over what you learn--if you don’t write it down, review it, think about it, Tweet it, or talk about it--you’re not going to DEEPLY LEARN it.
  5. 5. Why do people love sports, arts, service, & starting businesses?
  6. 6. At their best, they are done WITH people...
  7. 7. FOR people.
  8. 8. How does this compare & contrast with the way schools are operated?
  9. 9. Schools are sometimes about working WITH people, but only rarely FOR people.
  10. 10. Current model = a selfish pursuit of learning
  11. 11. Schools are also at their best, when students get to learn WITH people FOR people.
  12. 12. Innovation Partner Domenico Bobby Stephano Gisella Augusto Daniela Gonzalo Karen Pedro Andrea Carolina Sara Paolo Kathy Schools are also at their best, when students get to learn WITH people FOR people.
  13. 13. START WITH THE WHY - THE PURPOSE - THE VISION CONSCIOUS CAPITALISM CONSCIOUS LEARNING
  14. 14. Why School? “People don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it.”
  15. 15. Image credit: iStockPhoto Imagine being Ryan Hreljac's first grade teacher. After telling your class of six- and seven-year-olds that children in Africa are dying because of lack of clean water, one of your students is so moved that he has to do something. What starts as Ryan taking on extra vacuuming at home to earn money for wells eventually turns into Ryan's Well Foundation (1), a non-profit that, to date, has brought safe water and sanitation services to over 789,900 people. As Ryan's teacher, you helped him start on the path to a life purpose, which, according to research, may be one of the greatest services you ever render to your students. Seeking Meaningfulness William Damon, leading expert in human development and author of The Path to Purpose (2), states that students today may be high achievers but they have no idea what for. He believes that this sense of meaninglessness is one of the main contributors to the skyrocketing suicide and depression rates among our youth. One sample statistic: the American College Health Association reported in 2011 that 30 percent of undergraduates were so depressed they could hardly function. To combat this meaninglessness, Damon argues that students need to find a purpose in life -- something meaningful to themselves that also serves the greater good. In a series of studies of over 1,200 youth ages 12 to 26, Damon found that those who were actively pursuing a clear purpose reaped tremendous benefits that were both immediate and that could also last a lifetime. More immediate benefits included extra positive energy that not only kept students motivated, but also helped them acquire the necessary skills and knowledge to pursue their purpose, making them very strong learners. Youth with a strong sense of purpose also benefited from positive emotions such as gratitude, self- confidence, optimism and a deep sense of fulfillment -- all of which scientists have found help prevent depression and anxiety. Students who carry this sense of purpose into adulthood may also benefit in the long run. Research shows that adults who feel their lives have meaning and purpose are happier, more successful at work, and maintain stronger relationships. Pivotal Moments So what does this mean for educators? In-depth interviews of 12 purpose-driven youth from Damon's studies STUDENT ENGAGEMENT Put the Awe Back in "Awesome" -- Helping Students Develop Purpose JUNE 10, 2013
  16. 16. revealed that all of them came to their purpose through people outside their immediate families -- people that included their teachers. In his book, Damon suggests several ways that teachers can help their students discover a sense of purpose, such as asking about what's most important to those students and talking about their own sense of purpose as a teacher. But new research suggests another way: awe. While the research on awe is still fairly new, several studies conducted by the Greater Good Science Center (3)'s Dacher Keltner have shown that the experience of awe has the potential to turn students' lives in a new direction. Here's how awe works: when we experience an inspiring work of art or a grand vista in nature, or when we learn a new mind-expanding theory, we often feel a sense of vastness that gives us a new perspective on the world and our place in it. These two steps make up the emotion of awe. Keltner has found that awe makes us feel connected to something larger than ourselves -- a crucial and necessary aspect of purpose. According to Damon, without this larger connection, students are less likely to maintain their inspiration, motivation and resilience in the face of challenges. Imagine how life-changing this emotion could be for students who are struggling to find meaning in their lives and schoolwork! An awe experience has the potential to open their minds to new ways of thinking, including what their place in the world might be. For teachers who would like to use awe in the classroom to help students find purpose, here is one research- based suggestion that might spark even more creative suggestions from readers. Introduce an Awe-Inspiring Unit of Study When planning your next unit, think about how you might open the topic in a way that places it in the "grander scheme of things," and about how students might relate to both the topic and this grander scheme. For example, the video below was used in Keltner’s research lab to induce awe. Teachers could use it at the beginning of units on astronomy, geometry, perspective or measurement: Zoom IN Star Size 2
  17. 17. This next video was also used to induce awe in the lab and could be used for units on sustainability, nature photo/videography, geology, zoology or ecosystems: After showing the video, help students process what they just saw. Awe involves changing our mental models to incorporate the experience. Thus, to help students understand and process the experience at a deeper level, have them first write about what they felt or thought while watching the video. Then discuss with them how both the video content and the topic they're about to study relates to them personally and to the world in general. Setting the Stage It's important to note that your efforts to induce awe in students will fall on some deaf ears. Keltner found that not everyone is prone to awe -- particularly those who are not comfortable changing their outlook on the world. But that shouldn't keep teachers from trying to induce awe in students. UC Berkeley social psychologist Paul Piff speculates, "There's good reason to think that students who don't experience awe could benefit from those who do. For example, through the contagious effects of positive emotion, increased solidarity and cooperation, social facilitation, and benefiting from others' egalitarianism." And even if none of the students experience awe, the follow-up discussion still has the potential to generate a rich exploration Planet Earth Footage
  18. 18. EDUTOPIA WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION © 2013 The George Lucas Educational Foundation All rights reserved. about purpose. Helping students find a path to purpose is one of the noblest aspects of teaching. As Damon writes, "This is how all young people should feel about life when they are starting out. Idealism, high hopes, enthusiasm, and a sense of awe and wonder in exploring the world around them." Source: www.edutopia.org/blog/awe-helping-students-develop-purpose-vicki-zakrzewski Links 1 www.ryanswell.ca/ 2 www.williamdamon.com/pathtopurpose.html 3 greatergood.berkeley.edu/about Reprint Policy: www.edutopia.org/terms-of-use Privacy Policy: www.edutopia.org/privacy-policy
  19. 19. Why Learn? “People don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it.”
  20. 20. Why Innovation Academy? “People don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it.”
  21. 21. 7/31/13 30 Example Vision Statements - Top Nonprofits topnonprofits.com/examples/vision-statements/ 1/3 Contact  |  Sponsor EXAMPLES FEATURED  CAUSE:  SALVATION  ARMY RECOMMENDED SPONSORS LISTS EXAMPLES 30  EXAMPLE  VISION  STATEMENTS Vision  Statement:  (Desired  End-­State)  A  one-­sentence  statement  describing  the  clear and  inspirational  long-­term  desired  change  resulting  from  an  organization  or  program’s  work. The  following  vision  statements  were  selected  from  the  top  100  nonprofits  (based  on  a  series  of  web, social,  and  financial  metrics). Be  sure  to  check  out  our  Guide  to  Creating  Vision  and  Mission  Statements  for  more  helpful  tips. Details  on  how  this  list  was  compiled  can  be  found  by  scrolling  down  to  the  bottom  of  the  page. GENERAL  FINDINGS The  best  visions  are  inspirational,  clear,  memorable,  and  concise. Avg  length  for  the  full  30  organizations  listed  here  is  only  14.56  words  (excluding brand  references) Avg  length  for  the  first  15  organizations  is  only  10.5  words  (excluding  brand  references). The  shortest  contains  only  three  words  (Human  Rights  Campaign) The  longest  contains  31  words  (Amnesty  International) 30  EXAMPLE  VISION  STATEMENTS Oxfam:  A  just  world  without  poverty  (5  words) Feeding  America:  A  hunger-­free  America  (4  words) Human  Rights  Campaign:  Equality  for  everyone  (3) National  Multiple  Sclerosis  Society:  A  World  Free  of  MS  (5) Alzheimer’s  Association:  Our  vision  is  a  world  without  Alzheimer’s  (7) Habitat  for  Humanity:  A  world  where  everyone  has  a  decent  place  to  live.  (10) Oceana  seeks  to  make  our  oceans  as  rich,  healthy  and  abundant  as  they  once  were.  (14) Make-­A-­Wish:  Our  vision  is  that  people  everywhere.  will  share  the  power  of  a  wish  (13) San  Diego  Zoo:  To  become  a  world  leader  at  connecting  people  to  wildlife  and  conservation.  (12) The  Nature  Conservancy:  Our  vision  is  to  leave  a  sustainable  world  for  future  generations.  (11) Ducks  Unlimited  is  wetlands  sufficient  to  fill  the  skies  with  waterfowl  today,  tomorrow  and  forever. (13) In  Touch  Ministries:  proclaiming  the  Gospel  of  Jesus  Christ  to  people  in  every  country  of  the  world. (14) NPR,  with  its  network  of  independent  member  stations,  is  America’s  pre-­eminent  news  institution  (12) World  Vision:  For  every  child,  life  in  all  its  fullness;;  Our  prayer  for  every  heart,  the  will  to  make  it  so (19) Teach  for  America:  One  day,  all  children  in  this  nation  will  have  the  opportunity  to  attain  an  excellent education.  (16) ASPCA:  That  the  United  States  is  a  humane  community  in  which  all  animals  are  treated  with  respect and  kindness.  (18) Cleveland  Clinic:  Striving  to  be  the  world’s  leader  in  patient  experience,  clinical  outcomes,  research 50  Example  Mission  Statements 30  Example  Vision  Statements
  22. 22. 7/31/13 30 Example Vision Statements - Top Nonprofits topnonprofits.com/examples/vision-statements/ 2/3 RECENT  POSTS Nonprofits  with  Most  Likes  on  Facebook Free  Editorial  Calendar  &  Campaign  Planning Documents Top  100  Nonprofits  on  the  Web  [List] Nonprofits  With  the  Most  Followers  on  Twitter And  We’re  Back  (By  Popular  Demand) ABOUT  TOP  NONPROFITS Top  Nonprofits  was  founded  by  Craig  Van  Korlaar  as  a  place  to  publicly  learn  from  and  with  the  best nonprofit  organizations  &  leaders.  In  addition  to  the  numerous  free  resources  provided  on  this  site,  Top Nonprofits  also  provides  consulting  and  reporting  services. Contact  Us  |  Terms  of  Service  |  Privacy  Policy  |  Sitemap and  education.  (14) Goodwill:  Every  person  has  the  opportunity  to  achieve  his/her  fullest  potential  and  participate  in  and contribute  to  all  aspects  of  life.  (21) Smithsonian:  Shaping  the  future  by  preserving  our  heritage,  discovering  new  knowledge,  and  sharing our  resources  with  the  world  (17) WWF:  We  seek  to  save  a  planet,  a  world  of  life.  Reconciling  the  needs  of  human  beings  and  the needs  of  others  that  share  the  Earth…  (25) Save  the  Children:  Our  vision  is  a  world  in  which  every  child  attains  the  right  to  survival,  protection, development  and  participation.  (18) Kiva:  We  envision  a  world  where  all  people  –  even  in  the  most  remote  areas  of  the  globe  –  hold  the power  to  create  opportunity  for  themselves  and  others.  (26) Leukemia  &  Lymphoma  Society:  Cure  leukemia,  lymphoma,  Hodgkin’s  disease  and  myeloma,  and improve  the  quality  of  life  of  patients  and  their  families.  (18) Boy  Scouts  of  America:  To  prepare  every  eligible  youth  in  America  to  become  a  responsible, participating  citizen  and  leader  who  is  guided  by  the  Scout  Oath  and  Law.  (24) charity:  water  believes  that  we  can  end  the  water  crisis  in  our  lifetime  by  ensuring  that  every  person on  the  planet  has  access  to  life’s  most  basic  need  —  clean  drinking  water.  (28) Clinton  Foundation:  To  implement  sustainable  programs  that  improve  access  worldwide  to investment,  opportunity,  and  lifesaving  services  now  and  for  future  generations.  (19) VFW:  Ensure  that  veterans  are  respected  for  their  service,  always  receive  their  earned  entitlements, and  are  recognized  for  the  sacrifices  they  and  their  loved  ones  have  made  on  behalf  of  this  great country.  (32) Special  Olympics:  To  transform  communities  by  inspiring  people  throughout  the  world  to  open  their minds,  accept  and  include  people  with  intellectual  disabilities  and  thereby  anyone  who  is  perceived  as different.  (28) Creative  Commons:  Our  vision  is  nothing  less  than  realizing  the  full  potential  of  the  Internet  — universal  access  to  research  and  education,  full  participation  in  culture  —  to  drive  a  new  era  of development,  growth,  and  productivity.  (33) Amnesty  International:  Amnesty  International’s  vision  is  of  a  world  in  which  every  person  enjoys  all of  the  human  rights  enshrined  in  the  Universal  Declaration  of  Human  Rights  and  other  international human  rights  instruments.  (31) WHAT  DOES  THIS  MEAN  FOR  YOU? Is  your  vision  statement  longer  than  20  words?  Can  you  get  it  below  15?  Below  10?    Design  you vision  statement  to  clearly  communicate  what  you  are  working  to  achieve  in  a  way  that  people  can remember  it  and  communicate  this  to  others.  If  you  can’t  get  your  full  vision  below  15  words,  consider also  creating  a  vision  tagline  (2-­6  words)  which  people  can  more  easily  remember. HOW  THE  LIST  WAS  COMPILED Visions  statements  were  gathered  for  each  of  the  top  100  nonprofits  that  had  published  version and  then  evaluated  for  content  and  length. 30  were  then  selected  for  this  list  based  on  length  and  organized  roughly  from  shortest  to longest  (based  on  number  of  characters). The  number  in  parenthesis  at  the  end  of  each  line  depicts  the  number  of  non-­branded  words included  in  their  vision  statement. In  order  to  standardize  the  list,  we  removed  things  like  “[Brand's]  vision  is”  or  “The  vision statement  of  [Brand]”  when  it  created  redundancy  in  the  beginning  of  a  vision  statement. Related  Articles: 50  Example  Mission  Statements  
  23. 23. Possible Mission Statements: “People don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it.” We learn & work with people for people. We recognize the power of language, media, business and education, and we strive to use all of these to create a positive impact in our community and around the world.
  24. 24. CULTURE OF A BUSINESS
  25. 25. 7/31/13 Strong Company Culture Predicts Long-Term Success | Fox Small Business Center smallbusiness.foxbusiness.com/legal-hr/2013/06/03/strong-company-culture-predicts-long-term-success/ 1/3 Companies  that  focus  on  company  culture  may  create  not  only  a positive  work  environment;;  new  data  has  also  found  that  those companies  are  also  setting  themselves  up  for  long-­term  success. That’s  because  91  percent  of  respondents  to  a  new  survey  say companies  with  a  strong  sense  of  purpose  and  culture  also  have strong  financial  performance.  Additionally,  the  same  number  of respondents  at  companies  with  a  strong  culture  says  their  company has  a  strong  brand  that  differed  and  stood  out  from  their  competition. Ninety-­four  percent  of  respondents  also  say  they  have  strong satisfaction  among  customers,  while  79  percent  say  they  have strong  employee  satisfaction.         On  the  other  hand,  respondents  from  companies  without  a  strong culture  say  they  are  less  likely  to  perform  well  financially  and  have  a distinct  brand.  Additionally,  customers  and  employees  at  those companies  were  far  less  likely  to  be  satisfied,  the  research  found. "Organizations  that  have  a  culture  of  purpose  focus  on  delivering meaningful  impact  for  all  their  stakeholders  —  customers, employees  and  communities,"  said  Punit  Renjen,  chairman  of  the board  at  Deloitte,  the  company  that  conducted  the  research.  "Many businesses  have  made  great  strides  to  strengthen  their  role  as    Print    Email    Share  0  Comments TweetTweet 43 Strong  Company  Culture  Predicts  Long-­ Term  Success By  David  Mielach,  BusinessNewsDaily  staff  writer / Published  June  03,  2013 / FOXBusiness Enter  Email  Address Sign  Up   Like 9.6k Follow Follow @fbsmallbiz@fbsmallbiz Show  MoreShow  More CONNECT  WITH  SMALL  BUSINESS  CENTER Get  Our  Free  Newsletter MORE  STORIES 7  Signs  You're  Ready  to Be  Your  Own  Boss (FOXBusiness) ALLBUSINESS TOP STORIES How to Hire an Advertising Agency That Cares ... Poker Lessons for Entrepreneurs The Top 3 Business Credit Cards of Summer 201... 11 Tips for Creating Share- Worthy Content Are Balance Transfer Business Cards a Good Op... SEE MORE FROM ALLBUSINESS.COM REUTERS Like 47 ShareShare 32 What's  HotGrowing  Your  Business Young  Guns Small  Business  Spotlight HomeHome Starting  a  BusinessStarting  a  Business Marketing  &  SalesMarketing  &  Sales Finance  &  AccountingFinance  &  Accounting Legal  &  HR Technology  &  WebTechnology  &  Web EntrepreneursEntrepreneurs Home  OfficeHome  Office VideoVideo Search  Small  Business  Center   SearchSearch      Fox  News  Fox  News      uReport  uReport      Fox  News  Radio  Fox  News  Radio      Fox  News  Latino  Fox  News  Latino      Fox  Nation  Fox  Nation      Fox  News  Insider  Fox  News  Insider Login    Fox  Business
  26. 26. 7/31/13 Strong Company Culture Predicts Long-Term Success | Fox Small Business Center smallbusiness.foxbusiness.com/legal-hr/2013/06/03/strong-company-culture-predicts-long-term-success/ 2/3 RECOMMENDED  STORIES How  You  Can  Make  $100,000  a  Year  from  Social  Security Will  E-­Verify  Hurt  Small  Businesses? Shirley  Jones  reveals  shocking  details  about  her  sex  life  in new  autobiography A  Little-­Known  Way  to  Reduce  Your  Mortgage  Payment 5  Most  Sinful  Cities  in  America Why  Motivating  Employees  Depends  on  Their  Personality ALSO  ON  THE  WEB Five  tips  for  leading  efficient  meetings  (Allvoices) Employee  Retention  and  Engagement  Basics (NimbleSchedule) Six  key  components  of  analytics-­based  performance management  (Journal  of  Accountancy) 400GB  of  Lost  Data,  What’s  the  Big  Deal?  (Zerto) What  Leaders  Do?  (Best  Matters) The  How  To  Time  Management  Revolution (NimbleSchedule) corporate  citizens.  However,  our  survey  suggests  that  there  is  still so  much  more  work  to  do,  and  that  could  have  a  positive  long-­term impact  for  companies  that  do  so." Despite  those  benefits,  many  companies  are  not  focused  on instilling  or  creating  a  strong  culture.  Sixty-­eight  percent  of employees  and  66  percent  of  executives  say  they  their  business  is not  doing  enough  to  create  a  positive  culture  at  work. "As  leaders,  we  need  to  change  the  conversation  —  to  focus  more on  the  impact  our  organization  creates  rather  than  the  profit  we make,"  Renjen  said.  "Measurements  such  as  revenue  and  profit  fail to  capture  the  full  picture." Part  of  the  problem  behind  implementing  a  strong  culture  is  the disconnect  that  exists  between  employees  and  executives. Executives  were  more  likely  to  say  a  company  has  a  strong  sense of  purpose  that  could  be  easily  explained  than  employees. Additionally,  employees  were  also  less  likely  than  executives  to  say that  cultural  development  programs  were  integrated  into  a company's  strategy. "Many  companies  are  missing  an  opportunity  to  more comprehensively  integrate  purpose-­building  activities  into  their  core business  strategies  and  operations,"  Renjen  said.  "What  companies do  for  clients,  people,  communities  and  society  are  all interconnected.  A  culture  of  purpose  ensures  that  management  and employees  alike  see  each  as  a  reason  to  go  to  work  every  day." The  research  was  based  on  the  responses  of  1,310  employees  and executives  for  the  Core  Beliefs  and  Culture  Survey  for  Deloitte. TweetTweet 43 2 StumbleUpon Submit SHARE  THIS  ARTICLE  FOX  SMALL  BUSINESS  VIDEO [What's  This?] FROM  AROUND  THE  WEB Former  Tyco  Exec Denied  New  Parole Hearing Microsoft  to  Sell Windows  8  Upgrade  for $40 Why  China  Loves Android  More  Than iPhone Android  Fragmentation Remains  an  Issue Amazon  Appstore  Takes On  Europe 47 Like Amazon  to  Hire  7,000 Workers Detroit  ObamaCare  Bailout Backfire?
  27. 27. RULES?
  28. 28. CULTURE OF INNOVATION
  29. 29. EMPOWERMENT & RULES
  30. 30. EMPOWERMENT & RULES
  31. 31. EMPOWERMENT
  32. 32. EMPOWERMENT CREATIVITY CULTURE
  33. 33. CULTURE
  34. 34. CULTURE OF THE INNOVATION ACADEMY
  35. 35. What type of culture do we want to create?
  36. 36. This is true in education too! Being self-disciplined and self-motivated is KEY!
  37. 37. 7/31/13 Six Components of a Great Corporate Culture - John Coleman - Harvard Business Review blogs.hbr.org/cs/2013/05/six_components_of_culture.html 1/3 HBR Blog Network Six Components of a Great Corporate Culture by John Coleman | 3:00 PM May 6, 2013 The benefits of a strong corporate culture are both intuitive and supported by social science. According to James L. Heskett (http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2011/12/what_great_companies_know_abou.html) , culture "can account for 20-30% of the differential in corporate performance when compared with 'culturally unremarkable' competitors." And HBR writers have offered advice on navigating different geographic cultures (http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2013/03/when_crossing_cultures_use_glo.html) , selecting jobs based on culture (http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2012/05/when_choosing_a_job_culture_ma.html) , changing cultures (http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2012/12/to_change_the_culture_stop_try.html) , and offering feedback across cultures (http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2013/02/giving_feedback_across_cultures.html) , among other topics. But what makes a culture? Each culture is unique and myriad factors go into creating one, but I've observed at least six common components of great cultures. Isolating those elements can be the first step to building a differentiated culture and a lasting organization. 1. Vision: A great culture starts with a vision or mission statement. These simple turns of phrase guide a company's values and provide it with purpose (http://bigthink.com/experts-corner/purpose-as-a-compass) . That purpose, in turn, orients every decision employees make. When they are deeply authentic and prominently displayed, good vision statements can even help orient customers, suppliers, and other stakeholders. Nonprofits often excel at having compelling, simple vision statements (http://topnonprofits.com/examples/vision-statements/) . The Alzheimer's Association, for example, is dedicated to "a world without Alzheimer's." (http://www.alz.org/about_us_about_us_.asp) And Oxfam envisions "a just world without poverty." (http://www.oxfam.org/en/about/what/purpose-and-beliefs) A vision statement is a simple but foundational element of culture. 2. Values: A company's values are the core of its culture. While a vision articulates a company's purpose, values offer a set of guidelines on the behaviors and mindsets needed to achieve that vision. McKinsey & Company, for example, has a clearly articulated set of values (http://www.mckinsey.com.ar/our_work_belive.asp) that are prominently communicated to all employees and involve the way that firm vows to serve clients, treat colleagues, and uphold professional standards. Google's values might be best articulated by their famous phrase, "Don't be evil." (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don't_be_evil) But they are also enshrined in their "ten things we know to be true." (http://www.google.com/about/company/philosophy/) And while many companies find their values revolve around a few
  38. 38. 7/31/13 Six Components of a Great Corporate Culture - John Coleman - Harvard Business Review blogs.hbr.org/cs/2013/05/six_components_of_culture.html 2/3 simple topics (employees, clients, professionalism, etc.), the originality of those values is less important than their authenticity. 3. Practices: Of course, values are of little importance unless they are enshrined in a company's practices. If an organization professes, "people are our greatest asset," it should also be ready to invest in people in visible ways. Wegman's, for example, heralds values like "caring" and "respect," (http://www.wegmans.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?storeId=10052&identifier=CATEGORY_1341) promising prospects "a job [they'll] love." (http://www.wegmans.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay? storeId=10052&catalogId=10002&langId=-1&identifier=CATEGORY_533) And it follows through in its company practices, ranked by Fortune as the fifth best company to work for (http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/best- companies/2013/snapshots/5.html?iid=bc_sp_list) . Similarly, if an organization values "flat" hierarchy, it must encourage more junior team members to dissent in discussions without fear or negative repercussions. And whatever an organization's values, they must be reinforced in review criteria and promotion policies, and baked into the operating principles of daily life in the firm. 4. People: No company can build a coherent culture without people who either share its core values or possess the willingness and ability to embrace those values. That's why the greatest firms in the world also have some of the most stringent recruiting policies. According to Charles Ellis, as noted in a recent review (http://www.economist.com/news/business-books-quarterly/21576071-lessons-leaders-simply-best) of his book What it Takes: Seven Secrets of Success from the World's Greatest Professional Firms (http://www.amazon.com/What-It-Takes- Greatest-Professional/dp/1118517725) , the best firms are "fanatical about recruiting new employees who are not just the most talented but also the best suited to a particular corporate culture." Ellis highlights that those firms often have 8- 20 people interview each candidate. And as an added benefit, Steven Hunt notes (http://hiring.monster.com/hr/hr-best- practices/recruiting-hiring-advice/strategic-workforce-planning/hire-for-the-organization.aspx) at Monster.com that one study found applicants who were a cultural fit would accept a 7% lower salary, and departments with cultural alignment had 30% less turnover. People stick with cultures they like, and bringing on the right "culture carriers" reinforces the culture an organization already has. 5. Narrative: Marshall Ganz (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall_Ganz) was once a key part of Caesar Chavez's United Farm Workers movement and helped structure the organizing platform for Barack Obama's 2008 presidential campaign. Now a professor at Harvard (http://www.hks.harvard.edu/about/faculty-staff-directory/marshall-ganz) , one of Ganz's core areas of research and teaching is the power (http://www.hks.harvard.edu/degrees/teaching-courses/course- listing/mld-355m) of narrative (http://www.hks.harvard.edu/degrees/teaching-courses/course-listing/mld-356m) . Any organization has a unique history — a unique story. And the ability to unearth that history and craft it into a narrative is a core element of culture creation. The elements of that narrative can be formal — like Coca-Cola, which dedicated an enormous resource to celebrating its heritage (http://www.coca-colacompany.com/?topic=heritage) and even has a World of Coke museum (http://www.worldofcoca-cola.com/) in Atlanta — or informal, like those stories about how Steve Jobs' early fascination with calligraphy (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/steve-jobs-death-apple-calligraphy- 248900) shaped the aesthetically oriented culture at Apple. But they are more powerful when identified, shaped, and retold as a part of a firm's ongoing culture. 6. Place: Why does Pixar have a huge open atrium (http://officesnapshots.com/2012/07/16/pixar-headquarters-and-the- legacy-of-steve-jobs/) engineering an environment where firm members run into each other throughout the day and interact in informal, unplanned ways? Why does Mayor Michael Bloomberg prefer his staff sit in a "bullpen" (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/23/nyregion/bloombergs-bullpen-candidates-debate-its-future.html?pagewanted=all) environment, rather than one of separate offices with soundproof doors? And why do tech firms cluster in Silicon Valley and financial firms cluster in London and New York? There are obviously numerous answers to each of these questions, but one clear answer is that place shapes culture. Open architecture (http://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2011/02/designing-an-office-space-that-encourages-great-design.php) is more conducive to certain office behaviors, like collaboration. Certain cities and countries have local cultures that may reinforce or contradict the culture a firm is trying to create. Place — whether geography, architecture, or aesthetic design — impacts the values and behaviors of people in a workplace.
  39. 39. 7/31/13 Six Components of a Great Corporate Culture - John Coleman - Harvard Business Review blogs.hbr.org/cs/2013/05/six_components_of_culture.html 3/3 There are other factors that influence culture. But these six components can provide a firm foundation for shaping a new organization's culture. And identifying and understanding them more fully in an existing organization can be the first step to revitalizing or reshaping culture in a company looking for change.
  40. 40. When should you work to change a culture, and when should you respect a culture?
  41. 41. Positive & negative consequences for behavior?
  42. 42. Focused
  43. 43. 7/31/13 College teaches one class at a time - USATODAY.com usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/nation/2007-10-28-3162440689_x.htm 1/2 Home News Travel Money Sports Life Tech Weather News  » Nation    Cars    Auto  Financing    Event  Tickets    Jobs    Real  Estate    Online  Degrees    Business  Opportunities    Shopping Search How  do  I  find  it? Subscribe  to  paper   Videos  you  may  be  interested  in College  teaches  one  class  at  a  time Posted  10/28/2007  4:44  PM  |  Comment    |  Recommend E-­mail  |  Print  |   By  Justin  Pope,  AP  Education  Writer LAKE  GEORGE,  Colo.  —  It's  a  silly  old  expression,  but  Professor  Eric  Leonard  says  it's  true:  The  best  geologist  is the  one  who's  seen  the  most  rocks. Which  is  why,  on  a  crisp  fall  morning,  Leonard  was  driving  a  van  full  of  sleeping  bags  and  sleepy-­eyed  Colorado College  freshmen  into  the  mountains  around  Pikes  Peak,  where  the  history  of  the  Earth  is  writ  large  in  giant  slabs of  igneous  rock  jutting  up  from  the  ground. The  overnight  trip,  and  another  lasting  four  nights  a  week  later  in  Rocky  Mountain  National  Park,  offer  the  kind  of intense,  hands-­on  learning  that  the  typical  college  lecture  course  rarely  has. But  at  Colorado  College  it  is  common  because  of  an  unusual,  35-­year-­old  system  of  teaching. Typically,  full-­time  college  students  take  four  or  five  courses  simultaneously,  over  two  or  three  terms  per  year. Colorado  College  is  one  of  just  a  handful  of  places  where  students  take  one  course  at  a  time,  giving  it  their  full attention  for  3  1/2  weeks.  They'll  spend  most  of  the  day  in  class  or  on  extended  field  trips  like  this  one.  Then,  after a  long  weekend,  they  move  on  to  the  next  course. On  the  Colorado  Springs  campus  of  about  2,000  undergraduates,  you  won't  see  the  typical  college  scene  of students  walking  across  the  quad  between  classes.  There's  no  "between." The  challenge,  the  private  college  readily  admits,  is  to  make  sure  students  get  the  broad  introductory  knowledge they  need,  particularly  in  subjects  like  math  and  science.  But  the  payoff  is  an  intense  learning  experience  that  the school  insists  is  well  worth  it. "Most  kids  are  taking  courses  and  it's  all  theoretical.  They  don't  see  how  it's  actually  occurring  in  the environment,"  said  Brendan  Boepple,  from  Wilton,  Conn.,  perched  on  a  sharp  rock  face  above  the  South  Platte River,  about  an  hour  west  of  campus.  "We  get  to  go  out  and  see  how  it's  affecting  different  ecosystems."  He  also likes  having  the  long  "block  weekend"  between  courses  when  he  can  indulge  his  passion  for  fly  fishing. The  idea  of  the  block  plan  dates  to  the  late  1960s,  when  Colorado  College  was  preparing  for  its  centennial celebration  with  a  general  re-­examination  of  academic  and  campus  life.  Nothing  radical  was  on  the  table.  But  a small  group  of  professors  got  to  talking  at  Murphy's  Bar  near  campus,  and  one  asked,  "Why  can't  the  college  give me  15  students  and  let  me  work  just  with  them?" Across  higher  education,  there  was  lots  of  talk  at  that  time  about  shaking  up  how  colleges  operated,  and  some made  big  changes.  But  the  basic  rhythm  of  academic  life  remained  largely  untouched.  Lee  Shulman,  president  of the  Carnegie  Foundation  for  the  Advancement  of  Teaching,  says  the  reason  is  college  faculty  are  inherently conservative  when  it  comes  to  control  over  their  time. "There  are  some  utterly  irrational  ways  in  which  particular  ways  of  configuring  time  are  considered  sacred,"  he said.  "It's  almost  liturgical." At  Colorado  College,  the  proposal  prompted  much  debate  but  won  faculty  approval.  What  happened  next  is somewhat  surprising  in  hindsight.  The  idea  -­-­  new  in  American  higher  education  -­-­  neither  failed  nor  caught  on more  broadly.  Rather,  Colorado  College  nurtured  and  tweaked  it,  and  it  has  survived  as  a  nearly  unique experiment. "Modular  learning"  -­-­  as  experts  call  block  courses  -­-­  is  increasingly  common  in  high  schools,  and  some  colleges have  experimented  with  more  intensive,  full-­time  block  courses  for  at  least  part  of  the  year,  usually  between terms.  A  few  schools  have  created  intensive  courses,  like  St.  Lawrence  University  in  New  York,  which  takes some  students  into  the  Adirondack  Mountains  for  a  full-­semester  comprehensive  course  covering  everything from  ecology  to  philosophy. But  only  a  handful  besides  Colorado  College  -­-­  including  Cornell  College  in  Iowa,  the  University  of  Montana-­ Western  and  Quest  University,  a  new  college  in  Canada  -­-­  have  gone  to  a  full  block  system. "Why  don't  more  people  do  it?  It's  expensive,"  said  Colorado  College  President  Richard  Celeste,  a  former governor  of  Ohio  who  also  served  as  U.S.  ambassador  to  India.  The  average  class  size  is  16,  and  the  larger courses  are  required  to  have  two  instructors. "We  have  to  run  122  classes  at  the  same  time,  so  I  need  122  classrooms,"  Celeste  said. But  he  says  a  growing  number  of  students  discover  in  high  school  that  modular  learning  works  better  for  them and  are  looking  for  a  similar  college  experience.  Colorado  College  attracted  a  record  4,854  applicants  last  year. The  acceptance  rate  has  fallen  below  one-­third,  and  the  percentage  of  admitted  students  who  decide  to  enroll  is at  its  highest  in  more  than  15  years.  The  schedule  attracts  lots  of  competitive  skiers  because  they  can  take  blocks off  in  the  winter  and  make  them  up  during  summer  term. Both  the  rewards  and  challenges  are  obvious  in  Leonard's  class  of  first-­year  geology  students.  They  are  on  the road  by  8  a.m.  -­-­  the  crack  of  dawn  for  college  students  -­-­  and  lobby  Leonard  for  a  stop  at  a  popular  doughnut shop  en  route.  By  midmorning  they  have  pulled  off  a  dirt  road  in  the  Pike  National  Forest,  where  they  begin making  drawings  of  an  exposed  cliff  side.  Leonard  prods  them  to  look  at  the  formations  through  the  eyes  of  a geologist.  It's  only  the  third  day  of  class,  but  after  two  full  days  of  study  they  already  know  the  basic  terminology. "Even  when  we're  inside  it  allows  us  to  do  other  things,"  Leonard  says.  Students  cover  fewer  topics  than  their counterparts  elsewhere,  he  admits,  but  they  study  them  more  deeply  and,  he  believes,  ultimately  become  better geologists.  "It  takes  away  the  constraint  of  the  50-­minute  lecture  or  the  three-­hour  lab.  You  can  continue  on things  until  you're  finished." The  college  says  it  can't  really  say  for  sure  whether  students  learn  better  this  way.  There's  no  parallel  college with  the  same  curriculum  and  students  against  which  to  compare  it.  But  Leonard  says  his  students  do  fine applying  to  graduate  programs.  Celeste  says  he  measures  the  success  in  the  feedback  from  students,  and  from parents,  who  report  they  are  pleased  with  how  engaged  students  are  in  their  subjects. For  students  in  this  geology  class,  at  least,  one  of  the  benefits  is  an  affirmative  answer  to  a  question  students  are always  peppering  their  teachers  with:  "Can  we  have  class  outside  today?"  byTaboola House  approves lower  rates  on student  loans Raw:  Deadly  water main  explosion  in Brazil 7  Easy  Ways  of Living  Longer  A… Fitnea More  videos Census Troops  at  Risk Lotteries Become  a  member  of  the  USA TODAY  community  now! Log  in  |    Become  a  member What's  this?
  44. 44. 7/31/13 Cornell College www.thinkindependently.com/take-a-tour/8-cornell_college.aspx 1/2 Cornell  College Location:  Mount  Vernon,  IA Enrollment:  1150 Phone:  1-­800-­747-­1112 www.cornellcollege.edu Set  on  a  wooded  hilltop  overlooking  scenic  Mount  Vernon,  Iowa, Cornell  College  is  a  private,  four-­year  liberal  arts  college  offering students  an  extraordinary  array  of  opportunities—  in  the  classroom, on  campus,  and  around  the  world. At  Cornell,  you'll  focus  intensely  on  one  course  for  three  and  a  half weeks,  then  move  on  to  a  new  subject.  Known  as  One-­Course-­At-­ A-­Time  (OCAAT),  our  academic  structure  enables  you  to  spend  a month  creating  a  theatrical  production,  conducting  high-­level scientific  research,  or  immersing  yourself  in  a  new  language— giving  each  your  full  attention  and  best  effort.  It's  an  innovative approach  that  attracts  a  diverse  group  of  students  from  across  the country  and  around  the  world,  and  it's  practically  unique:  Cornell  is one  of  only  two  national  liberal  arts  colleges  on  the  block  plan. Opportunities  are  not  restricted  by  the  borders  of  a  traditional classroom.  You  might  spend  a  month  in  Spain  exploring  the  origins of  Spanish  civilization,  or  work  as  a  full-­time  intern  on  a  presidential campaign.  With  just  one  course  at  a  time,  off-­campus  study  is  both manageable  and  meaningful. As  a  student,  you'll  enjoy  our  active  campus  life  and  welcoming community.  More  than  100  clubs  and  activities  invite  you  to  hone your  leadership  skills,  showcase  your  talents,  and  explore  your interests.  In  our  residence  halls,  you'll  meet  new  friends  who  share a  love  of  learning  and  campus  involvement. "Cornell  is  one  of  two  colleges  on  the  block  system  – one  course  at  a  time.    Faculty  as  well  as  students love  both  the  system  and  the  school,  and  so  would you.    It  is  the  only  entire  campus  to  be  included  in the  National  Register  of  Historic  Places.    In  my  book there  is  no  better  college,  and  it  produces  much more  than  its  share  of  writers,  scholars,  and executives." ~Loren  Pope,  Author  of  Looking  Beyond  the  Ivy League  and  Colleges  that  Change  Lives Austin  Neverman Cedar  Rapids,  Iowa Class  of  2012 Majors:  French,  Spanish I  chose  Cornell  because  of  the  One  Course  At  A  Time  (OCAAT)  academic  calendar.  Not  only  do
  45. 45. 7/31/13 Cornell College www.thinkindependently.com/take-a-tour/8-cornell_college.aspx 2/2 I  get  the  close  relationships  with  my  professors,  but  I  also  get  to  focus  all  of  my  energies  on  one  particular  class as  well  and  really  dig  into  that  subject.  I  believe  this  also  allows  for  a  more  enhanced  learning  environment.   Cornell  (and  Iowa)  is  the  most  ideal  location  for  me  because  I  am  a  native  and  thus  am  living  in  a  comfortable, familiar  environment;;  but  also,  I've  come  to  appreciate  the  friendliness  and  neighborly  attitudes  Cornellians possess.  Cornell  is  a  great  school  because  it  really  does  fulfill  its  motto  in  that  we  do  have  one  extraordinary opportunity  after  another,  and  I  am  thrilled  to  be  a  part  of  that.   Visit  Cornell  College  at  Iowa  Private  College  Week       ©  2013  Iowa  Association  of  Independent  Colleges  and  Universities  |  Contact  Us Web  Development  by  Iowa  Web  Development  Web  Hosting  by  HostIowa.net
  46. 46. Media & Communication
  47. 47. Randy Scherer August 5th-7th Project-based Learning Workshops Monday Tuesday Wednesday 8 - 3:30 Innovation Academy 8 - 3:30 With Teachers 1:05 - 3:20 Secondary Staff 3:30 - 5:30 PYP Teachers 3:30 - 5:30 MYP Teachers 3:30 - 5:30 DP Teachers ext Monday N
  48. 48. August 5th-7th Project-based Learning Workshops “The greatest effects on student learning occur when teachers become learners of their own teaching, and when students become their own teachers.” John Hattie Visible Learning forTeachers
  49. 49. “Transformed by Technology and Project-Based Learning: High Tech High” August 5th-7th Project-based Learning Workshops
  50. 50. “The purpose for tech in High Tech High is not for consumption, it’s for production.” - Larry Rosenstock, CEO of High Tech High August 5th-7th Project-based Learning Workshops
  51. 51. “We want kids behaving like scientists, and behaving like photographers, and behaving like graphic artists.” - Larry Rosenstock, CEO of High Tech High August 5th-7th Project-based Learning Workshops
  52. 52. Randy Scherer August 5th-7th Project-based Learning Workshops Monday Tuesday Wednesday 8 - 3:30 Innovation Academy 8 - 3:30 With Teachers 1:05 - 3:20 Secondary Staff 3:30 - 5:30 PYP Teachers 3:30 - 5:30 MYP Teachers 3:30 - 5:30 DP Teachers
  53. 53. nnovative Independent roject P
  54. 54. Alan Watts “What do I desire?”
  55. 55. Start by: LOOKING FOR PROBLEMS IN OUR COMMUNITY THAT YOU CAN HELP SOLVE.
  56. 56. THEN: SEE IF YOU CAN UTILIZE ONE OF YOUR SKILLS OR PASSIONS TO HELP SOLVE IT
  57. 57. FINALLY: SEARCH FOR A MENTOR OR AN ORGANIZATION THAT YOU CAN HELP AND LEARN FROM IN THE PROCESS
  58. 58. DEADLINE: AUGUST 12th

×