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Bach 15 invenciones a dos voces para piano vol.1

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Bach 15 invenciones a dos voces para piano vol.1

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Bach 15 invenciones a dos voces para piano vol.1

  1. 1. ( N . 7" e. e? ‘ ‘A- o y HSON romoN No. 23
  2. 2. Johann Sebastian Bach VOLUME l FIFTEEN TWO—VOICE INVENTIONS FIFTEEN THREE-VOICE INVENTIONS IN TWO VOLUMES (Also complete in one volume) EDITED BY DR. EBENEZER PROUT INTRODUCTION BY DR. PERCY GOETSCHIUS BQSION: OLIVER DITSON COMPANY: NEWYORK ‘ CHICAGO: LYON a HEALY, mo. LONDON: WINTHROP Rooms, LTD. Covrrizhr, mcmvii, by Oliver Dimar. Company Copyright, mcmviií. by Oliver Dítson Compnny
  3. 3. m
  4. 4. THE PURPOSE AND STRUCTURE OF THE INVENTIONS The so-called Inventions of Bach were not originally designed as two separate books, distinguished by the num- ber of contrapunto! parts employed, butTas one continuous book in which the two-voice and three-voice styles ap- peared in regular altemation, in corresponding keys. Each two-voice number bote the title Inventia, and served appar- ently as a prelude to the corresponding three-voice number, called Sinfonia. In this respect the complete work exhibits a certain analogy with the Well-tempered Clavichord, the difierence being that each volume of the latter consists of Preludes and Fugues, and embraces all twenty-four major and minor keys, while here only fifteen keys are represented, — ex- clusive of all keys beyond the four-sharp and four-flat signatures. For this reason, and in consequence of much greater simplicity of treatment, the two books of Inventions (as they are now collectively called) do not attain quite the same degree of artistic dignity and eminence as that which characterizes the Well-lempcred Clavichord, and assigns it such an unchallenged rank among the noblest and most master-ly products of musical creation. But on this very account the Inventions possess a singular degree of use- fulness for teacher and student; they lie somewhat less remote from the ordinary students’ powers of musical apprehension, and therefore secure earlier appreciation and sympathy than the austero beauty and power of the Well-tempered Clavichard arouse; and their comparative technical simplicity places the majority of the Inventíons well within the reach of the medium advanced student. The Invenhïam and Sinfanías were intended for tech- nica] eïercise, and their use for this purpïoseficannot‘ be too strongly urged upon every teacher, inasmuch as their value in every fundamental respect (only excepting the item of sheer Velocity) is simply unequaled in technical literature; and surely, the expanding mind of the musical student can find no better nourishment than in daily contact-vsïííiflthese perfect gems of absoluta music. The style, as usual with Bach, is the so-called imitatory or contrapuntal. Each number has its yflqliyq-some- times very brief, as in the first Invention; sometimes con- siderably longer, as in the second one. This motive is intonated first in one part and then in another, in a great variety of methods and always with effective contrapuntal accompaniment; it thus becomes the “thematic” basis of the entire texture, and demonstrates its identity as the “subject, ” whose development and evolution constitute the artistic purpose of the composition. That such a process of pure thematic re-announcement in more or less regular succession from beginning to end may be, and often is, conducted in a mechanical manner, with skill and ingenuity, but without real musical fervor, is undeniable. This imminent risk is infallibly avoided by Bach, however, because with him the contrapuntal devices are never anything more than the means to an end; the motives appear as íncidents, only, in a complete musical picture, whose melodic lines, harmonic and modulatory colors, and structural proportions are replete with true beauty, and not only admit of the closest scrutiny, but reveal with each succeeding analysis new evidences of this great masters marvelously keen sense of tone-relation. In such compositions as the Seventh, eleventh, and twelfth of the three-voice Inventions one wholly forgets the rigorous tech- nical processes, the severe conditions of logic, that were necessary in their making; no odor of the workshop clings to them. As to the structural design of the Inventions, some of them are ‘very genuine examples of the two-part song form (with a dístínct cadence near the centre), and a few add to these parts the “return to the beginning, ” which dis- tinguishes the three-part song form (the design upon which nearly all of Mendelssohn’s Songs without Words are based). For example, see the three-voice Invention, No. 6 (two- part form) and No. 7 (three-part form). But the greater number of them have a kind of “sectional form, ” akin to the song. forms, but ditïering from the latter in that the “sections” are optional in number, are less definite in form, and less distinctly indívidualized than the “parts. ” Each section terminates with a cadence, —often so brief as to be rather implied than expressed; and, generally, each section has its individual contents, though it is a fore- gone conclusion that a master like Bach could not fail to provide many points of agreement between the several sections. This element of corroboration, —the particular sign oí masterly musical construction, —- is one of the most striking features of these Inventions. A certain parallelism between the sections, while sometimes so modified or concealed as to escape the notice of the ordinary student, is nevertheless invariably present, and sufiïciently accounts lor the fact
  5. 5. that the Inventions (when understood and properly inter- preted) do no! create the impression of fonnless and pur- poseless motiveevolution, which would seem to be justly expected of music of this continuous polyphonic character. One of the best illustrations of this perfection of “form” is found in the very first two-voice Invention, which it is well worth our while to analyze with reference to its struc- tural details: In measure r themotive (C major) appears first in the upper part, and is imitated an octave below in the lower part; in measure 2 the motive is transferred to the dominant, appearing first in the upper, and then in the lower _ part. Thus, the first measure constitutes a tiny “period” (question and answer), and the two measures together a larger “period. ” In measures 3 and 4 the motive appears four times in succession in the upper part, in so-called con- trary motion (“upside down”); measures 5 and 6 are devoted to the necessary change of key, and at the begin- ning of measure 7 a fairly strong cadence is made in G major, closing the first section. In measures 7 and 8 the process of measures 1 and 2 is repeated, —but here the lower part begins; measures 9 and 1o repeat the process, but now the motives are in contrary motion; so here we find the tiny period in measure 7, the larger period in meas- ures 7 and 8, and another still larger period, in which measures 9 and ro respond to measures 7 and 8. In meas- ures u and 12 the motive appears four times in succession, —this time in the lower part, in contrary motion; these measures, therefore, balance measures 3 and 4, but are inverted (the upper and lower parts changing places); and, similarly, the following measures r3 and 14 correspond to measures 5 and 6. and the second section clases‘ with a cadence at the beginning of measure r5. In measure r5 the motive appears in the upper part and is imitated in the lower, —as in the very first measure, —but it is now in contrary motion; in measure r6 the motive appears in its original direction, in ‘the upper part, and is imitated in the lower; these two measures are reproduced in “sequence” in the following two; so here again we have the tiny period in measure r5, the larger one in r5 and 16, and the still larger one in which measures r7 and r8 answer to r 5 and 16, —precisely as at the beginning of the second section, but in a new form. In measures 19 and 2o there is- a cor- roboration of measures 3-4 and 11-12, but here the master ' resorts to the only means of variety left, -he places the motives again in the upper part, as at first, but adopts the original direction instead of the contrary motion. Measures 21 and 22 prepare for and consummate the final cadence. Surely no design could be more perfect, not only in the balance of its smaller particles and the corroboration of its larger sections, but also in the never-failing variety it exhibits. Similar perfection of “ form” will be found in nearly every one of these Inventions; and the discoveríes which the earnest student is certain to make, in carefully ana- lyzing these little masterpieces, will richly reward him for his pains. ti, New York City. March, 1908. g i .
  6. 6. J OHANN SEBASTIAN BACH 1685 —175o OHANN SEBASTIAN BACH was bom at Eísenach on March 21 , 1685. J He received his first instruction in music from his father, Johann Ambrosius Bach. In his ninth year he lost his mother, Elizabeth, followed the next year by his father, who died in January, 1695. The orphan boy was then entrusted to the care of his eldest brother, Johann Christoph, who was fourteen years his senior and organist of the principal Church in Ohrdruf. In 170o he was thrown onhis own resources, as his brothers increasing family rendered it no longer possible for Sebastian to remain a member of the household. He was fortunate enough to obtain admission to the school of the Convent of St. Michael at Lüneberg, where he sang in the choir until his voice broke, and also played violin, clavier, and organ. Here he remainedfor three years, taking the opportunity from time to time‘ to make journeys on foot to Hamburg, to hear the famous organist there, Johann Adam Reinken. In 1703 he was appointed Hofmusikus (Court Musician) at Weimar, as violinist in the private band of Prince Johann Emst of Saxony; but he held this post for only a few months, as he ac- cepted an invitation to become organist at the new church at Amstadt. At Easter of the year 1707 he was appointed organist at the Church of St. Blasius, Mühlhausen. In October of the same year he married his cousin, Maria Barbara, daughter of Johann Michael Bach, organist at Gehren. The post at Mühlhausen did not prove to be very comfortable; in 1708 Bach went to Weimar, as organist and K ammermusikur to the duke. The nine years of his residence there are described by his biographer, Spitta, as “the golden period” of his organ compositions; it was at this time that he wrote a large number of the chorale arrangements for the organ, and of the great preludes and fugues for the same instrument. It was in Weimar also that he developed his genius as a Composer of sacred music. In 1717 Bach accepted a position as director of the music to Prince Leopold of Anhalt-Cüthen. This post differed entirely in its character and the duties which it involved from those which he had previously held. Up to this time he had been chiefly engaged in organ playing and the direction of a choir; here he had neither to discharge the one duty nor the other, but to occupy himself with orchestral and chamber music. Consequently we find him producing very little but instrumental works during his residence in Cüthen. It is not easy to fix with certainty the exact date of the composition of Bach’s works. ‘We are, however, able to assign to this period three most important works for the clavier, which rank among Bach’s finest compositions; these are the Fiftem I nventímis and Symphanies, the French Suites, and the first part of the Well-temporal Clavichord. Among his duties was that of accompanying the prince on his joumeys; Leopold, who was devoted to music, was in the habit of taking some of the members of his band with him. In May, 172o, Bach went with his patron to Carlsbad; on his return home in July he was met with the terrible news that his wife, whom he had left in perfect health, had been buried on the 7th of that month. He had had seven children‘ by her, of whom four grew up, among them being the two most dístinguished of his sons, Wilhelm Friedemann and Carl Philípp Emanuel. On December 3, 1721, Bach married again. His second wife, Anna Magdalena, was the youngest daughter of the court trumpeter, J. C. Wülken, and was twenty-one years of age. She was very musical, an excellent singer, and assisted her husband greatly by copying his music for him. During their twenty-eight years of married life she bore him thirteen children, six sons and seven daughters; so that in all Bach was the father of no fewer than twenty children. In x723 Bach left Cüthen for Leipsic, to undertake the post of cantor of the Thomasschule in that city, an appointment which he retained till his death. Here he had far larger scope forhis genius than would ever have been possible to him at Cüthen. In sacred music he was far more prolific than in any previous period of his career. Not less important, though less numerous than his vocal works, were the instrumental compositions of the Leipsic period. In 1747 Bach, at the request of Frederick the Great, who was an enthusiastic amateur, paid a visit to Potsdam, where he excíted the greatest admiratíon on the part of the monaxch, more especially by his extemporizations.
  7. 7. ln the winter of 1749-50 Bach, like his great contemporary Handel, became totally blind. Operations on the eyes were tried without success, and the medical treatment connected with these undermined his powerful constitution. On July r8, 17 5o, he had an apoplectic Stroke, and died on the 28th of the same month, at the age of sixty-five. Bach’s personal character was most estimable. He was deeply religious, a most excellent husband and father, and, though one of the first performers of his age both on the organ and the clavier, was free from the least tinge of atïecta- tion or conceit. He lived a quiet life in the bosom of his family, and, unlike Handel, never traveled beyond the boundaries of his native land. He was an admirable teacher, as is shown not only by the works that he wrote for the education of his own sons, —— among which may be specially named the I nventions, and the first part of the Wcll-lempered Clavichord, — but also by the fact that many of the most distinguished organists and composers of the latter half of the eighteenth century were his pupils. Fifleen I nvenlions and Symphonies. These pieces are, with the exception of the second Sinfonia, found in their earliest form in the Clavierbüchlein for his son, Friedemann Bach. As they are found in the latter part of that book, their date is probably 1721 or 1722. Bach here calls the Inventions “Praeambulum, ” and the Symphonies “Fantasia. ” In x723 he revised them, and worked them into a collection, to which he gave a title of which the following is a translation: “An honest guide, wherewith a clear way is shown to lovers of the clavier, but especially to those who desire to learn, not only (r) to learn to play clearly in two parts, but also in further progress (2) to proceed correctly and well with three abbligata parts, and at the same time not only to obtain good inventioner, but also to perform them well; but most of all to attain to a cantabile style of playing, and at the same time to acquire a strong taste for composition. ” (The italics are Bach’s own. ) It will be seen from this title that the aim of these pieces was primarily educational, as indeed is shown by their being written at first in Friedemann’s instruction book. It would nevertheless be a great mistake to regard them merely as exercises; in their musical value and interest they are quite worthy to compare with the other clavier works (the French Suites and the first part of the WelLtempered Clavichord), written at about the same time at Cüthen. In most editions all the Inventions are placed first, and the Symphonies afterwards; but the fact that the order of keys is exactly the same in the two sets shows that there was intended to be a connection between them; as a matter of fact, the Inventions bear to the Symphonies very much the same relation as do the Preludes to the Fugues in the Well-tempered Clavichord. Further, in one of Bach’s autographs each Invention is followed by the corresponding Symphony. The editor has therefore had no hesitatíon in following this arrangement, and recommends that Inventions and Symphonies should be played together. But inasmuch as the latter, being in three parts, are considerably more diflicult than the former, it is advisable that those students who come to this volume without a Dreliminary acquaintance with Bach’s works should practice the Inventions first before working at the Symphonies. N . B. —— For a full account of the Composer and his work, see Piano Competition: o} J. S. Bach, Vol. I: Shorter Cam- posílions, edited by Ebenezer Prout in the Musicians Library.
  8. 8. THEMATIC INDEX 15 TWO-VOICE INVENTIONS 15 THREE-VOICE INVENTIONS OR SYMPHONIES 1.11., -= ¡n-¿ l nrvma 4 —r1 5.135.: ru- —n11—í. nn u ‘í r- . — ——__V ——n —— ——— —————1-1t a n —¡ - _— ———-¡ r——— ¡U —; — ¡: - n —: a p-u n-: :———¡¿ g , “Fx .4 rv———1—nc n: n.4—-—--u iwv: ru: '—n¡1--—- _—-n-4; n ——rt ——-. QI 2: —. ¿u .121: / 4L x11 — ¡q-ïj; rn 1: -¿j. - L1 ‘nm nun-n á-iíin. » -1q¡—'u ¿nar-nn n: r- —'nr— __ . - 1;; - ¡urr ur: r---—4 w pugn- n11 ram
  9. 9. FIFTEEN TWO'VOICE IN VE NTIONS INVENTION I, ¿n o major JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH Edited by Ebenezer Prout (1685-1750) s. .. é (Allegro J: os) Copyright MCMVII byoliver Ditson Company
  10. 10. TïííïíÏïïííïííí Ñ Í ' ííï 1'11 ïíííííTl L. ‘ ‘»Í4—ÉÉÏJ @— l _ 111? ¡In! u; nun-ani: n -d_gflz—_fi
  11. 11. INVENTION H, in C minor 1:80) (Moderato u. .l’—ríí—11—: “I í— m _ _ _— í H E“, s. _ __. y_c. ___ sÉ-m ___. am. 1 111í————— 9-11111 1.221s: naïj-I-x "Jïimïfllfí
  12. 12. 1x1: III marnan-muuumï r Lmr-I m'm@ E-É . ú ng-r nsmaummmá<tnmn —_—. — H Émïïlíízgíïs -'— . ——— EíI-Zííïl L“ Éíïí m m m _ _ m — _ _ _ W m w m q 'nulr uu; ï——nnn u maintain;
  13. 13. _ . _ , , ,_, __¿___ ; _ E mí‘“¿ï-—-—-Éï¿ T“*——fl IÏÉ&Ih [,1 m/ ‘Éíïïïíïflíï Éïzfiïíll JI ; IÍmÉ íímííïíïï H É‘ 111MB ímï ÉÉMI X14“ T1 n21; Ïi 1Q ÉI1JAIÉH E111 mrïmw 9C (¿H BMQíIÉÉJEJ lïuLïmmlígXï
  14. 14. ‘ . ïï RÉ IEEE — > ÉÉlI% É I ÉHÏEIÏÉÉ-E » ÉI_—. —-—:1 fl ¡unan-ninguna _ unn-uu: warm: ¡su ur ¿maximum n una una p- u ¡mama 3.a ___. .. _--__ Ïïííiïmïíïï ÏÉÏÉÏÉ—K JIÉ 1 “invitan D'&J run! --— ' , ' - v , ‘ïfïg E EE X4 .5 flláïïïflm %'fiIÜX? 'mmm¡? ' ¿Ïfllïmïíïm ¡Éíï K Vïmmflm
  15. 15. INVENTION IV, in D minor 2 a: ___ = =t . _t. _._. , ___. ___. a Ma, ___. ____ , ____ t. ___ ____ 3 sae, ___" ___ ___. 1 = __ __ ___. É En c. . . c e ___. ___ __ ___ e : =_. . h= ___-c . . __ “a. y e s? ., __. .7 ¿“w _n_ (/2 M. The whole of this movement, except where otherwise marked to be played legato. (Ed. ).
  16. 16. nun: l Exa: —-' r unn: w ——¡: .u: .4ï ¡Lríamí rw 1.4- Lrr uzuaínnmn: ïnuzir -Ú. Ú'Í n ¿hi1 __ __ _ _ w 11111111511 1 _ " ‘ l‘ ' ¿"a L. _‘ a. un? " num! —- lm——l—ïnluun . _.- m 11 Ií -‘. Í; ÉÉÉÉ Ïíïïíïí IÏZÏILV‘ x [anfiïï ¡J I. "-"—; ¿ w 1 l __ w
  17. 17. 10 INVENTION V, in El» major (Allegro moderato Jun) '_-’-! AB. The small w are only found in one autograph; the others have ae the only omuhent the shnke in the last han The editor recommends the omíssion of all the others, which are inserted in smaller type for the sake of completeness.
  18. 18. fi_iffl te Ïíí hh ííï . J ííIZJ .1 IJÏ IJIÉ= EÏÉ1Ï n¿u—m¡————1¡ @J7 (“Ir- n/ y _ 4 .1 10:71 711 -—ímn¿mn¿ma E3 . ¡—'LI— hhííí’ 11 E KJ ¿É 1.El ¿FI {Y E! í 1:1.‘ ÚÏ Ip? ‘ ÉÏÉIÉEÏÉÉI- ÏÏÁIÉ HUlfi¿Ï- hÉ Ñí/ ÏÏÁÉJÉÉJ? IKZ ïïïïlïïJ IJÉ 1.3111 Kit-Re fl ïí . ‘T ïïïïïïÍ --—7KÏïÉ1XÉ1ÍJ_É1'*-—*ÉKÉÉ. ZT ' WTÏÏIIJE líïnfl ïíjflh X111 Xïéï 1T“ h Éïflï X= Z E’ JJEVÑE —3—1 7T X1 ' ¿1_ 2 1.51 IT UT ZTZZZJ É ‘A I’ ¡ÉXZJXE 111% LÏT ÉSÏXÉÉÏ í í'eïíïï_ïlï I Éïïï É _ :1 fi—-— . W , . «v a r1 —— m——.4- 1 M1!- ———Inu—1——— ——n_ _Ï'- —.4— ¡In —————. ¿——— m-“ti J———————' ———— ', — I—_—— r 1 n. P" rv-¿sï " n21: amh I -4 mu: ———Ïí Éí__ I n-TTÉ —uíh—-—í Ï 1 ÏÉÑ ïhhíjíïífï hhí .1 [JT Ï-C IÏVÏÏÉZÉÍ [.7 7T hflï’ h h ÏïÍJ É 1321.1 LJ‘ 132i; [fin I ïïïíïíí —ÏÏ—ÉB
  19. 19. ÉÉÉÉn —m? _ -— zñ-fi . l - l I . =IAIC'B'É fiïïïÍï-ÉJ ¡Ïnfllflalf 1K " rr AJ esmas; ‘ ‘EÉÉMÉÉ m? -A IÉÉÏJ ILTZÉ ÏÉÍ —1.J! Z ¡"ZC Á JI IE ÉXíJW Hflíïïíïïïïíïïïïíïïïíï ENE É-ÏXÏÏXEÍ íïïíí _í ¿ —É u—-. .u—-—: —¡ _ w : ._: :_ _ w
  20. 20. ___ a. __ a". ___ ___ ____ ___“ ___ ¿___ “___ poco cresc. _ —e _ . . _ .
  21. 21. 14 in E minor : ï.= =r: =.. -:: rr; -.= = W_Ï—-II¡— ‘ I NVE NT ION VII, (Moderato J: 72) Ïhhííí Éhhí . . = —- = ._ É . h. __ __ _. a . _ . Zí-ï Ïïíí —_ZZ1ÍÏÉL_{ * - Q1 "-
  22. 22. .1!’ -n'w_: í -. ._Ï#—__ ‘w317 ghlfi ÉJIÉÏÉÍÏ —í_húíí ‘ff-í ímíllhhlí en w = '. É. @E1Z1.1I: jïflwïuwruusyïí: ‘l í! ïueïwaïmmïuiuflsï 1.a jim-rm; ¡(‘Togüe '
  23. 23. in F major. INVENTION VIII, JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH (1685 175o Editrd by Ebrneztr Prout —41—1rI. a 1.11.1 ¡ria J ———-—1-¿———¿—: —¿—1 ---É-—L 1-—-— ——í-1Z11 . -.= copyflgh! MCMVII by Oliver Damm Company
  24. 24. n @ÏÉM%E E’ ÏÏEÏÉ» examina finmw m En —fim
  25. 25. 18 INVENTION IX, in F minor (Anïiïgnte con moto J .1 _ es" -ÍW ___. y: ___ .3‘ un, I“. . = É .411 I’? - _ZÁ El‘: — _ 51'! basso espressívo
  26. 26. 20 __ “___ 3_. ,.. = É _y h. .. ___ _. . ___ ___. , ,= fi / e i. “ ___ ___ t. .. ___ ___ ___. ___ e ___ _= _ _. n. m-—í ___. w í o INVENTION X, in G major l e m w V (
  27. 27. una: 1—nm ___ =
  28. 28. 22 INVENTION XI, in G minor. (Moderatto J = so) '-Iv: =1'— te ' . 1.111 111 . 112111.: n1=1-'— -""1ï1111 ÏZLW Z111 h! I . _ . ¿TIN Z-LIÉ _ITÏTLFV ïíï I . _= L. . = _ _ i‘ .5 r 2-1.: ji E 'I: .Q1:. Aw AB The ornaments printed small are not found in all the MS. and can be played or omitted at the diseretion of the perfor- ' t in full in the text. mer: they are therefore not printed ou
  29. 29. r . «.7 . « vn ; .. É-JWÍ ÉÏ , ZGÏEÏÏ- = " 729éL'—7.}':1-= ==' Ifmmïüïlmíí? ’ y — Zzlíïíïl a ‘V1711?’ 2€‘ Ésa; ¡ni-ur fra-unas: rar AEFEv-mrïum Tí Q P“ I N1 QZÏZW
  30. 30. É É FM . l JXJ. ÏÏW. JÉ—J '. %IO JJ ‘J-I‘ — I XÉZJ-ÏÑJX1É mïlm. ‘ Í‘ Lflïïïïïï 1' í ïïüïlïïïï mïïïáz- . mu: J I-Jï. ‘ r'u—' Ii - K I 111 ZJEZ; D111 IT! í Él _ > 1.a 1.455124 1 n—mnr ¡un ¡mi ___; 1- .1:; g r7 ¡JNE-E ¡"F511 I—W—_E' l——l ——nam—.4w¡n1 -I—. : VÉIÏÉE’AE m—— —— — E——Z—— n31 Ézífluufl —. —_— ___-—- í . . Li 1É-ÉÍJÚ ííílïïïLl TÍ. ’ —líxí'í I ¿-1 5,. ' = l rgnnvínlm. . '—n u mu; 1531.71- 1 1v-
  31. 31. a fibra i‘: ¿a . ‘P’ y;
  32. 32. ’41KíÏ' íïfií . Ïlflïlïíflf EPíÍEÉ ímïfimfií u. .mv—m'iaz ¿Jn-animé Tí: ¡mu! m; ¡uvnïí ¿una v v. ’ u, w , _ , . , ,,. - z, _ . . I íú ÉÉ . H—E Immm ÉEEE ¡mí fiíï É ÍT—-ÏÏÍÏ
  33. 33. —n—¡ inn; n—n—n&mmj—/ uï—nï1mrnanïm :3 l e ¡ I ' mu: =as. =:'r: .=. n_": r.= fl—‘. —mmn tu! úlïïïlfiï. d m% KII*-*J1EIIÉXJÉZ—' ILÏHZÑL’! -—— ïlflfl4ïïïlílflflï y . V ‘Jíïflfllflllíïíïgfiíïïmïuïíïm mífllfií“ '. _ - _¿ ,3 ‘. . , .. , -¡ , ,4"’4} T-JÏÚZÏ—Ï11XJÉJÉLÏÏudïmïíIïïïíIí —2 í—í- ÏÏ ‘ÏÏÏÏ IÉÏÏ*—-——Ï1íÏÉÏIJÉÉÉJÉ. ÏÏJ_ Ellmmí 5:11am ïïïí-ïïím——*—ïflï íïfilláï; mi m—ín— --! -fiÉ‘_í m
  34. 34. in B! » major INVENTION XIV, Jam) (Andante moderato
  35. 35. 29 a II'— — -_ —"—— I LJ I’ IEIÏÉ‘ 20
  36. 36. minor V, inB :100) INVENTION X (Allegretto J p seller-mudo poco cresc. 30
  37. 37. 31 m . . m. .. _ Á _ ¿e? e: ___ e __ / ___ . fu, w Í . . — ¿Ï . s. i. __I mu . ___ V . i 1 A , y : - hl. ___. —. E1 . ¡:1 >_ V i: M kay . —-;1 . __ Em. I Z J . .. . ... És! I. . . i“ a. (l?
  38. 38. ' I Í Í The MuSIOIanS L1brary PIANO ' VOLUMES ' ISSUED COMPOSER TITLE EDITOR BACH. JOHANN SEB. SHORTER PIANO COMPOSITIONS DR. EBENEZER PROUT A ‘BACH, JOHANN SEB. LARGER PIANO COMPOSITIONS DR. EBENEZER PROUT BEETHOVEN, L. VAN PIANO COMPOSITIONS - TWO VOLUMES EUGEN D'ALBERT BRAHMS, JOHANNES SELECTED PIANO COMPOSITIONS RAFAEL JOSEFFY CHOPIN, FRÉDÉRIC FORTY PIANO COMPOSITIONS JAMES HUNEKER CHOPIN, FRÉDÉRIC THE GREATER CHOPIN JAMES HUNEKER FRANCK. CÉSAR PIANO COMPOSITIONS VINCENT D’INDY GRIEG, EDVARD PIANO LYRICS ¿r SHORTER COMPOSITIONS al BERTHA F. TAPPER GRIEG, EDVARD HAYDN. F. JOSEPH 0339393 LARGER PIANO COMPOSITIONS fi BERTHA F. TAPPER TWENTY PIANO COMPOSITIONS a! XAVER SCHARWENKA Oüüfifñüfiüüüüüflfáfáüüü LISZT, FRANZ TWENTY ORIGINAL PIANO cOMPOsITIONs a _ AUGUST SPANUTH LISZT, FRANZ TEN HUNGARIAN RHAPSODIES e; AUGUST SPANUTH LISZT, FRANZ TWENTY PIANO TRANscRIPTIONs a Aufnïïgáïgïlg MENDELSSOHN, FELIX THIRTY PIANO COMPOSITIONS ga DR PERCY GOETSCHIUS MOZART, WOLFGANG A. TWENTY PIANO COMPOSITIONS a CARL REINECKE SCHUBERT, FRANZ SELECTED PIANO COMPOSITIONS eg AUGUST SPANUTH SCHUMANN, ROBERT FIFTY PIANO COMPOSITIONS a XAVER SCHARWENKA WAGNER, RICHARD SELECTIONS FROM THE MUSIC DRAMAS a OTTO SINGER FRENCH PIANO MUSIC VOL. l ü EAKLY coMPosEns a ¡amm ISIDOR PHILIPP FRENCH PIANO MUSIC VOL. II ü MonEKN coMPosEKs a: sama by ISIDOR PHILIPP GERMAN PIANO MUSIC GERMAN PIANO MUSIC EARLY ITALIAN PIANO MUSIC a H, ,ï: ,'; ,°g¿g'gg'ïgï, "ggy¿gï, ko a sam, MICHELE ESPOSITO MODERN RussIAN PIANO MUSIC vOI_. I en Anmswxo ro xonesrcusnxo :5 Ediwdby c. VON STERNBERG MODERN RUSSIAN PIANO MUSIC VOL. II a. una»; T0 wunam gg 54h. “, c, voN sTERNaERc VOL. I s! EAKLY coMPosEKs ü Edited by MORITZ MOSZKOWSKI VOL. II fi MODEKN cOMPOsERs {It Edited by MORITZ MOSZKOWSKI TWENTY—FOUR NEGRO MELODIES fi TRANSCRIIED FOR THE PIANO av 4;. S, COLERIDGBTAYLOR o OLIVER DITSON COMPANY" BOSTON a

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