Please, find your name and sit in your assigned seat.Thank you for your cooperation!Talk at your tables about one student ...
Presented By: Y. Brown, M. LaCerte & S. RossJanuary 3—4, 2013Scotlandville Magnet High School Teacher Retreat
Please…
B L O C KBACKGROUNDINFO:What do you alreadyknow aboutCommon Core andBlock Scheduling?WHAT I LEARNEDFROM THELESSON:Take not...
THE BODY OF OURSCHOOL Head: one dream or goal you have for our school Ears: something you have heard about our school (p...
GOALS FOR OUR TIME Teachers will be able to explain the connection between theinstructional shifts required by the transi...
TRANSITIONING TO THE COMMON CORE
 What is the Common Core State Standards Initiative? The Common Core State Standards Initiative is a state-led effort to...
Until now, every state has had its own set of academicstandards, meaning public education students at the samegrade level...
T H I N G S A R E C H A N G I N G !!! Ready or not, things are changing… we have to change too!Lets take a look at a few...
THINGS ARE CHANGING!!!If this is the world our children are living in and the one we arepreparing them for, what does thi...
ACT‘S ‗FIRST LOOK‘ AT THE COMMON CORESTANDARDS – ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS3851 53reading writing language16Percent of 2009 11t...
ACT‘S ‗FIRST LOOK‘ – ACHIEVEMENT GAPELA4760 631124 261933 32reading writing languageWhite African American Latino17Percent...
CHANGES ARE COMING TO SCOTLANDVILLE MHS…
COMMON TYPES OF BLOCK SCHEDULEFall Semester Spring SemesterCourse 1 Course 5Course 2 Course 6Course 3 Course 7Course 4 Cou...
SAMPLE SCHEDULE7:10 – 8:40 1st Block8:45 – 9:05 Enrichment9:10- 10:40 2nd Block10:45 – 12:50 3rd Block10:45 – 11:15 1st lu...
OUR FIRST TRIAL RUN**THIS IS SUBJECT TO CHANGEJanuary 14, 2013 January 15, 20131st Hour 1st Hour (Enrichment)3rd Hour 2nd ...
MODEL A FOR 90 MINUTE CLASSTime Activity10 min. Greeting, Announcement of Objectives25 min. Teacher-directed, whole class ...
MODEL B FOR 90 MINUTE CLASSTime Activity10 min. Review, Focus on Objectives/ Warm-up15 min. Lecture/ Facts review25 min. S...
PROS & CONS OF BLOCK SCHEDULING Divide your poster into FOUR equal sides. Label like the chart below. List 2—3 advantage...
TIME TO READ…Find the article in your folder that discusses theAdvantages and Disadvantages of Block Scheduling.Compare y...
Block Scheduling will NOT solve all of ourproblems…but we must make somechanges. Why?• Teachers deal with a large number o...
You‘re teaching, but are theylearning???
HOW MUCH DO YOU KNOW ABOUT BLOCKSCHEDULING?
Words for Number 1’s1. Teacher Collaboration2. Improved Student Attendance3. Extended Learning Time4. Differentiated Instr...
Words for Number 2’s1. Time Management2. Common Core Curriculum3. A/B Block Schedule4. Classroom Management5. Fewer Studen...
LET’S GO SHOPPING… ACTIVITY
CLOSURE: BACK TO THE BLOCK CHARTFill in the C and K sections of yourB-L-O-C-K Chart. Be ready to share withthe group.
TOMORROW‘S FOCUS Tomorrow, you will actually write a 90-minute lesson to teach on Jan. 14th and 15th. Youwill collaborate...
Faculty Presentation on Block Scheduling
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Faculty Presentation on Block Scheduling

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This is a presentation I created and presented to the faculty at my school in January 2013.

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  • Start time: 9:00 a.m.
  • 5 minutes (3 for reviewing goals, 2 for turn and talk about the one goal that is most compelling to you) (9:30)We will begin our day by exploring data and some of the instructional requirements that are necessary because of the transition to the Common Core State Standards. We have heard much about what is to come as we move into using these standards as the core of our instructional programs. Today we will look closely at the changing level of cognitive demand that is to come and how transitioning to Block is critical to ensuring that we have the necessary time for instruction that engages our students in thinking critically. Click for next goalThe next goal for our time together is to look closely at advantages and disadvantages of the 4x4 block. While we know this transition is necessary and the right thing to do for our children, we also know that there will be some obstacles in making the transition. It is critical that we begin preparing for this transition now, so we can minimize these challenges and provide the best block experience for our students possible.Click for next goalFinally, we will deconstruct the different components of the block, and work together to build our repertoire of strategies for effectively implementing this type of scheduling. Take two minutes and turn to your shoulder and discuss which of these goals resonates most with you, what you hope to take from today and why.
  • Emphasize that for our time today we will address the first two goals and tomorrow we will focus I on the last goal.
  • Time for this section: About 2.5 hours (allow for a 15 minute break around the 1100 hour. Keep teachers engaged until finished– which should be at about 1215– lunch time)Let’s get into or first goal which is looking at the relationship between the CCSS and block scheduling.
  • Intro by stating that we are getting ready to embark upon the next big wave in education– unlike NCLB this one gets at the core of our practice– in addition to the outcomes of it. We want to begin our discussion about transitioning to block here because– what we do relative to instruction in our schools MUST be reflective of what is happening in the broader society around education. Click slide to make the words appear– pose the question and have them answer it..Presenter soap box:Nothing– in my opinion– shows what is at the heart of the current curriculum, instruction and assessment trends in education than the assessment samples the show what children will ultimately need to be able to do by the end of a unit, semester, or school year. So– lets look at a few. In your folders, I have placed two assessment items– both from grade 10. I want you to take a moment and with your table group, discuss what you see in these assessment items and chart what would need to happen instructionally to prepare students for these types of assessments. Bring the group back to attention after 10 minutes and have them share what they came up with at their tables. As they share chart a few things that they say– esp as it relates to how these assessment items will require a different level of teaching and thinking for students (this is what you want to illicit from the group– that in order for kids to be successful in completing these types of assessments what we teach, how we teach and how much time we take to engage students in thinking must shift).
  • These changes that are coming with our curriculum and the move in to the CCSS are reflective of a broader shift happening in our country, and most of the times the trends in education are. We just looked at samples that closely resemble how our students will be assessed beginning in 2014, lets take a look at the impetus for this shift in education by exploring some of the factors that have gotten us to this place. Play video at this link: (will need to have this up and ready in a separate window– make sure you have internet access or download and save the vide using Real Player)http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVQ1ULfQawk After the video have teachers discuss the prompt at their tables. Take two minutes for group share– make sure the end impression left is that we are preparing our students for a high, tech, fast paced, transitional world. Draw contrasts between this world and the one that we have grown up in which was characterized by security.) Key point: The world we are preparing our students for is different for the one we grew up in– so teaching must be different. As stated earlier, often the shifts that we see in the world of ed are related to shifts we see in our world. These are the shifts our educational leaders considered along with data that we are going to review that has taken us into this era of the common core
  • We talked shift in the world– now lets talk about the data that really ramped up the impetus and support for this movement.
  • Take a moment and read this quote. A quick note, the nations that have asterisks next to them are ones that have similar if not greater percentages of students living in poverty when compared to the US. So…why are we so behind (take group responses)– get them to the place where they understand that we are trailing countries in education that we once called “third world”. Help them understand that some of this is because of reforms such as NCLB that pushed teachers away from engaging students in deep instruction and instead focused on preparing kids to be successful on “functional assessments” Our focus changed– as a nation and subsequent to that our children’s performance has declined. Let’s look at additional data relative to this
  • In reviewing the national data– we see that low percentages of our students are able to perform well on the ELA portion of the ACT– which is one of our two benchmark exams in this nation that assess college readiness.
  • This ELA data becomes even more bleak when you look at groups and how children are performing comparatively. Not only are children in this country not fairing as well as they should, black and brown children are showing significantly low levels of college readiness.
  • While I do not have the disaggregated data for math, the low scores over all show that we also need to make significant strides forward in math as well.
  • So… the worlds is changing. Our data says that we must do a better job of preparing our students. As your tables, process (read prompt). Give teachers 2 minutes to discussThis is a good stopping point for a break.
  • Show prompts– don’t address them (they are for the teachers to read and consider)Presenter soapbox: Given all we have discussed, it is important to think about our clients, our students, and what they will need to weather and succeed in this changing world. We have to think about the product we well to them everyday– that product being our teaching and the opportunity to learn– whether and how we need to upgrade our product to better suit their needs and the mode to deliver it in.
  • This is what our product, our teaching must focus on. This is what our kids are looking for– engaging experiences that challenge their minds and keep them engaged. If we want to be relevant– if we want them to be successful in this world, if we want our college and career readiness to improve-- we have to know how to get this product to themNOTE: you are transitioning into teaching critical thinking which is what the common core is all about. BE SURE TO MAKE THIS POINT AND MAKE IT OFTENCCSS=CRTICAL THINKING !!!
  • For the next hour or so I want us to spend some time getting crystal clear on what the classroom looks like where critical thinking is being cultivated and work from this place to organize our recent learnings and knowledge around the shifts we have to make for the purpose of prioritizing our workTo get to this– I want to use a body of knowledge that is familiar to all of us but to have us take a different look at it, as in its revised state it can be used as a foundation for clarifying what the thinking classroom looks like and help us get a better grasp of the level of cognitive demand our teaching much reach with the implementation of the Common Core….
  • So… please stand up find a partner you have not talked with today and discuss the three prompts. Note: Have teachers find a partner and stay with them to discus prompts. Given then 4 minutes, raise your hand and bring their attention to you. While they are still standing, present the next two slides
  • NOTE: Presenter must insert their own Bloom’s story here
  • Here is what I now know about Blooms– I know that the cognitive dimensions (read slide and expound). I also know that the knowledge dimension exists– and this is critical because…Be very explicit about describing this to the teachers. Here is the big deal about this– in order to ensure thinking is the center piece of the classroom– teachers have to now and be explicit about the thinking they are teaching about the content. Key points6 dimensionsComplexity of thoughtTeaching thinking Not about hard questions– about what happens in the mind– relative to the content being processed (go to RBT page and review)In addition to knowing and understanding the Cog Dimensions– if thinking is to be the center piece of the classroom– we have to make sure we are clear on what the kids are thinking about– this is where the knowledge dimension comes in. There are four domains within the KD--- and they progress in terms of abstractness and complexity. Cant have intersection of every CD with every KD. Cant create factsGive teachers time to processNEXT SLIDE
  • Blue represents the type of thinking we want students to do about the (blue part) content.
  • So why does this matter???? So what is of extreme importance as we set our priorities as teachers, is that we are clear on what should be going on in our classrooms– at each of these levels of cog demand so we can consistently employ instructional delivery practices that get our kids to being able to successful in mastering the knowledge and skills so they are able to transfer them to novel/ real world contexts on authentic perf. tasks. That is teaching with rigor. That is teaching that gets kids to think critically. That is what the CCSS will demand of us and our students. This will ensure our students are college and career ready. This will ensure they are able to be successful in this changing world.
  • What I can say– beyond a shadow of a doubt- is that I did not know very well – when I first became aeacher– what the implications for teaching thinking were – and because I didn’t– I was a teacher who was consistent, had well managed classrooms where the kids were always engaged in doing some activities that I now realize were super effective at missing the mark as it related to teaching the more complex thinking skills that are assessed and necessary for C and C readiness. And I am sad to say that I got pretty good evals from my leaders bc I was in school where what was valued most was managing kids and keep them engaged. I thought that was success. Well.. My first round of test scores said that wasn’t– so I had to go deeper and re-evaluate how I defined effective instruction– and what I came up with is that it is instruction where the thinking aligns with the content and both align with the type of teaching and instructional activities the kids receive is quality instruction.So I want us to define the classroom at each level—to ensure that as we re-enter the school year we are clear about what the thinking classroom is and so we can begin to align our teaching practices towards those at the more complex end of the the cognitive and knowledge dimensions.
  • Allow processing (quite writing)– let teachers stand and share– then do a quick share with the group (optional)!! Presenter: Close out this section by making sure all understand the necessary shifts and realize that to make thinking the centerpiece of our classrooms will require taking our students deeper into the content and engaging them in rich, authentic learning activities that give them time and space to make meaning. We cant do this in 51 minutes. Teaching that requires a heightened level of cognitive demand will take more time. We must transition to block so that we have the time we need with our students to cultivate their “thinking” capacities.
  • Please allow 1 hour for lunch (if it is beings served to teachers) and 1 hour 15 minutes if they have to get lunch on their own
  • For the next section of the day, we are going to dig in and begin the planning to ensure we transition well into the block. We know that this transition will not be without its fair share of challenges, so it is important that we engage you in helping us think through what some of the advantages are of making this transition and what we need to do to ensure we maximize these advantages and what the disadvantages are and how we can plan proactively to minimize those. Each of you has in your folder a group assignment. Please look for your groups number arrange your chairs in a circle and then turn your attention back to me. Presenter: When they get into their groups– have them turn attention to you and take out their articles
  • Group has 70 minutes for the entire sessionPresenter: Review the slide with the group and explain the three levels of text protocol. Advise the group that if a person finishes their turn before the five minutes is up, they have the opportunity to select a second passage from the text. Prepare a chart as an exemplar that is structured as follows:Chart 1:Advantages Teacher Needs to Maximize Advantage Things for Admin to plan for (if applicable)Chart 2:Disadvantages Solutions to minimize disadvantage Needs from Admin to address disadv.If teachers finish early, they can review the teaching strategies for block packet (pass it out after about 60 minutes of time in the activity have passed)
  • Give participants five minutes to respond. Let them stand and find a partner to share with.
  • Faculty Presentation on Block Scheduling

    1. 1. Please, find your name and sit in your assigned seat.Thank you for your cooperation!Talk at your tables about one student you had tremendous success withduring 1st semester and one who struggled in your class.Why do you think Student 1 was successful, and why was Student 2unsuccessful? Name 1—2 things that would have helped Student 2 be moresuccessful in your class.OO ND W
    2. 2. Presented By: Y. Brown, M. LaCerte & S. RossJanuary 3—4, 2013Scotlandville Magnet High School Teacher Retreat
    3. 3. Please…
    4. 4. B L O C KBACKGROUNDINFO:What do you alreadyknow aboutCommon Core andBlock Scheduling?WHAT I LEARNEDFROM THELESSON:Take notesthroughout thepresentationMY OPINIONS:List your thoughtsand feelings aboutanything you hearduring thepresentationPERSONALCHANGES:As you listen to thepresentation, listthings you plan to doin order tosuccessful transitionto the 90-minuteclass period.KNOWLEDGECHECK:Look back at whatyou listed under―Background Info‖.Was all of yourinformation correct?Add to what younow know aboutCommon Core andBlock Scheduling.
    5. 5. THE BODY OF OURSCHOOL Head: one dream or goal you have for our school Ears: something you have heard about our school (positive or negative) Eyes: what you would like to see happen at our school Shoulders: one school-wide/classroom problem that weighs you down Hands: something you did 1st semester that you wish you would have―hand‖led differently Stomach: something that makes you sick about some of your students Heart: something you love about our school Right foot: one new thing you plan to do to move your students in the rightdirectionBe prepared to share!!
    6. 6. GOALS FOR OUR TIME Teachers will be able to explain the connection between theinstructional shifts required by the transition to the Common Coreand the adoption of Block Scheduling. Teachers will examine the advantages and disadvantages of theblock schedule and begin working together to develop plans tomaximize the positives and minimize the negatives associated withthis transition. Teachers will engage in activities that help foster theirunderstanding of each part of the block and increase theirrepertoire of strategies for implementing each component.
    7. 7. TRANSITIONING TO THE COMMON CORE
    8. 8.  What is the Common Core State Standards Initiative? The Common Core State Standards Initiative is a state-led effort to establish a shared setof clear educational standards for English language arts and mathematics . Thesestandards are designed to ensure that students graduating from high school areprepared to go to college or enter the workforce and that parents, teachers, and studentshave a clear understanding of what is expected of them. The standards arebenchmarked to international standards to guarantee that our students are competitive inthe emerging global marketplace.
    9. 9. Until now, every state has had its own set of academicstandards, meaning public education students at the samegrade level in different states have been expected to achieveat different levels. This initiative will allow states to shareinformation effectively and help provide all students with anequal opportunity for an education that will prepare them to goto college or enter the workforce, regardless of where theylive.
    10. 10. T H I N G S A R E C H A N G I N G !!! Ready or not, things are changing… we have to change too!Lets take a look at a few things that significantly impacting thestate of education in our countryhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVQ1ULfQawk
    11. 11. THINGS ARE CHANGING!!!If this is the world our children are living in and the one we arepreparing them for, what does this mean for the structure andwork of our schools??
    12. 12. ACT‘S ‗FIRST LOOK‘ AT THE COMMON CORESTANDARDS – ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS3851 53reading writing language16Percent of 2009 11th graders scoring at college-career ready benchmarkSOURCE: ACT, Inc., A First Look at the Common Core and College and Career Readiness, December 2010
    13. 13. ACT‘S ‗FIRST LOOK‘ – ACHIEVEMENT GAPELA4760 631124 261933 32reading writing languageWhite African American Latino17Percent of 2009 11th graders scoring at college-career ready benchmarkSOURCE: ACT, Inc., A First Look at the Common Core and College and Career Readiness, December 2010
    14. 14. CHANGES ARE COMING TO SCOTLANDVILLE MHS…
    15. 15. COMMON TYPES OF BLOCK SCHEDULEFall Semester Spring SemesterCourse 1 Course 5Course 2 Course 6Course 3 Course 7Course 4 Course 8MondayA DayTuesdayB DayWednesdayA DayThursdayB DayFridayA DayMondayB DayCourse 1 Course 5 Course 1 Course 5 Course 1 Course 5Course 2 Course 6 Course 2 Course 6 Course 2 Course 6Course 3 Course 7 Course 3 Course 7 Course 3 Course 7Course 4 Course 8 Course 4 Course 8 Course 4 Course 8Finish an entire course inONE semester. See the samekids every day. Teach 3blocks, off 1 block.Take the entireyear to finish acourse. Seestudents everyOTHER day.Teach 3 blocksand off 1 block.*More like acollege schedule.
    16. 16. SAMPLE SCHEDULE7:10 – 8:40 1st Block8:45 – 9:05 Enrichment9:10- 10:40 2nd Block10:45 – 12:50 3rd Block10:45 – 11:15 1st lunch12:20-12:50 2nd lunch12:55 – 2:25 4th Block
    17. 17. OUR FIRST TRIAL RUN**THIS IS SUBJECT TO CHANGEJanuary 14, 2013 January 15, 20131st Hour 1st Hour (Enrichment)3rd Hour 2nd Hour5th Hour 4th Hour7th Hour 6th Hour(Gainey & Brucato 27)
    18. 18. MODEL A FOR 90 MINUTE CLASSTime Activity10 min. Greeting, Announcement of Objectives25 min. Teacher-directed, whole class instruction, mini-lesson30 min. Student-centered/teacher assisted activity15 min. Whole Group Discussion on Student-Centered WorkCould include student presentation10 min. Formative Assessment, Homework Assignment, Closure ofDay‘s Work
    19. 19. MODEL B FOR 90 MINUTE CLASSTime Activity10 min. Review, Focus on Objectives/ Warm-up15 min. Lecture/ Facts review25 min. Small Group Work25 min. Small Group Presentation15 min. Formative Assessment, Homework Assignment, Closure ofDay‘s Work
    20. 20. PROS & CONS OF BLOCK SCHEDULING Divide your poster into FOUR equal sides. Label like the chart below. List 2—3 advantages and disadvantages of having a 90-minute class period for both teachers and students.Teacher PROS Teacher CONSStudent PROS Student CONS
    21. 21. TIME TO READ…Find the article in your folder that discusses theAdvantages and Disadvantages of Block Scheduling.Compare your answers to those in the article. Add toyour lists. Share with the people at your table. (3minutes)As a group, select what you think is the biggestadvantage (*) and biggest disadvantage(X). (5 minutes)Be ready to share.
    22. 22. Block Scheduling will NOT solve all of ourproblems…but we must make somechanges. Why?• Teachers deal with a large number of students every day.• Teachers teach for 5 or 6 periods/several preps• Collaboration is non-existent• Our attendance rate needs improvement• Students have a large number of classes and too much homework• CC, ACT, EOC, SLTs (and all those other acronyms)• Too much stress on teachers and students
    23. 23. You‘re teaching, but are theylearning???
    24. 24. HOW MUCH DO YOU KNOW ABOUT BLOCKSCHEDULING?
    25. 25. Words for Number 1’s1. Teacher Collaboration2. Improved Student Attendance3. Extended Learning Time4. Differentiated Instruction5. More Checks for Understanding6. Student-Centered Classroom7. 4 X 4 Block
    26. 26. Words for Number 2’s1. Time Management2. Common Core Curriculum3. A/B Block Schedule4. Classroom Management5. Fewer Students to Teach6. Increase Graduation Rate7. Student Success
    27. 27. LET’S GO SHOPPING… ACTIVITY
    28. 28. CLOSURE: BACK TO THE BLOCK CHARTFill in the C and K sections of yourB-L-O-C-K Chart. Be ready to share withthe group.
    29. 29. TOMORROW‘S FOCUS Tomorrow, you will actually write a 90-minute lesson to teach on Jan. 14th and 15th. Youwill collaborate with peers to create a lesson, and share that lesson with the entire group. In preparation for our time tomorrow, please do the following: review the handout on Teaching Strategies for Block Schedules. Search the Internet for sample 90-minute lessons Create a possible hook/warm-up/bell-ringer for the 90-minute lesson you‘re going toteach on Jan. 14th and 15th. Think about the lesson objective(s) you intend to teach for next week. They will mostlikely be the focus of your lesson plan.

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