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What To Do After Library Checkout Ends for the Year: 13 Easy-N-Awesome Ideas for Middle School Librarians and Teachers

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What To Do After Library Checkout Ends for the Year: 13 Easy-N-Awesome Ideas for Middle School Librarians and Teachers

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Library checkout has ended, but you still have classes scheduled for library time. What to do? Try one of these 13 easy-to-implement ideas! They will work in the classroom, too!

Library checkout has ended, but you still have classes scheduled for library time. What to do? Try one of these 13 easy-to-implement ideas! They will work in the classroom, too!

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What To Do After Library Checkout Ends for the Year: 13 Easy-N-Awesome Ideas for Middle School Librarians and Teachers

  1. 1. What to do after library checkout ends for the year? 13 easy-n-awesome ideas for middle school librarians & teachers
  2. 2. Show Book Trailers of Summer Reading Recommendations This idea came from one of my 8th grade boys yesterday. He asked if they could watch book trailers for all of library time in the last week of school. You can play the trailers in a loop through YouTube playlists (your own or someone else’s).
  3. 3. Demo AudiobookSync AudiobookSync is one of my favorite online services for teens. Every summer, they release two free audiobooks each week for 15 weeks of summer. Readers have one week to download that week’s two titles. Once downloaded, the audiobooks never expire, so readers can listen to them anytime, as many times as they like. And yes, it’s completely FREE! No string, no ads. “Read More This Summer! Free Audiobook Downloads for Teens”
  4. 4. Share This Year’s Top Checkouts Does your library circulation system allow you to create a report of the top/bottom titles checked out for the year? Pick 10 or 20 top titles and share them with your students. Can they guess the top titles?
  5. 5. Booktalk New Book Releases for June, July, August Use online bookstores like Amazon, Borders, and Barnes and Noble to create a slideshow of books that will release in the summer. Include a short summary, genre, and cover image. Bonus points if there is a high-quality publisher’s book trailer!
  6. 6. Read picture books! Pick a favorite end-of-the-year picture book to read aloud. Some ideas:
  7. 7. Show summer-themed movie clips Okay, this one may not be as reading-related as the others. But you could include books made into movies like Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days and Flipped.
  8. 8. Inside-Out Book RecsPrep: Arrange chairs/desks in two circles, one inside the other. Inside and outside chairs face each other. Before activity begins: Students write down up to three books they want to recommend to other students and WHY they are recommending them. Activity: Students sit in chairs, either on inside or outside circle. Inside person has one minute each to booktalk their book with the outside person across from them. Switch after one minute. Inner circle moves right. Outer circle moves left. Repeat.
  9. 9. Play Kahoot Oh m’days, but my students love Kahoot! If you’ve never used Kahoot, you are missing out! Kahoot is a free online quiz game generator. You can create your own games or use one of thousands of user-created games. The vast majority of Kahoots are teacher-created, and you can sort by subject. *Students will need an ipad, computer, or smartphone to play Kahoot.
  10. 10. “Name That Book!” You can play this in many ways, including Kahoot or Jeopardy. In teams, students battle to guess a mystery book’s title based on clues you give. Clues could include the author’s name, the front cover with title blacked out, a piece of the front cover image, the publisher’s blurb, etc. Be sure to use books many students are familiar with.
  11. 11. Recommend books for next year’s students The Book Recommendation Jar was a hit with my students last week! My fingerprints were nowhere on this idea. From conception to finished project, this Recommendation Jar was entirely student-created and managed.
  12. 12. Use Goodreads to prepare next year’s first book order. Create a Goodreads list with a title like “My Middle School Book Recommendations.” Show students how to add books they want to see in the library next year. Be sure to emphasize that they not add books you already have (they can use the catalog to check). Something to consider: With this activity, you need to know the class well. Some may add inappropriate books, just to be funny. Proceed with caution!
  13. 13. Public library outreach Invite your local public library to talk to the students about summer reading programs and help them sign up for library cards.
  14. 14. “Tips for Success” Videos If your library has ipads or digital cameras (with video), you can have students create short advice videos for next year’s students. You could group students and give them themes such as reading, using the library, study skills, friendships, cafeteria food, recess, do’s and don’ts, etc. Compile the videos and show them on the first day of library next year.
  15. 15. Love the clipart? Clipart on slides 1-5, 7, and 12-15 were purchased and licensed for commercial use from DollarGraphicsDepot.

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