Chester county, pa

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  • 11 Resources: Where did they com from? Glatthorn Feuerstein Sternbeg Perkins Gardner Goleman
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  • 11 Resources: Where did they com from? Glatthorn Feuerstein Sternbeg Perkins Gardner Goleman
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  • Copyright 2007 Solution Tree
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  • 11 Think Pair Share
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  • 11 Review When might you use strategy?
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  • Chester county, pa

    1. 1. <ul><ul><li>Launching Self-Directed Learners </li></ul></ul>Bena Kallick August 31,2011
    2. 2. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: <ul><li>What are the characteristics of effective, creative problem solvers? </li></ul><ul><li>How might educators create school and classroom conditions to learn, practice, assess and report students' growth toward internalizing these habits? </li></ul><ul><li>How are the Habits of Mind central to a 21 st century curriculum? </li></ul><ul><li>How might we map the habits as they evolve for students across time? </li></ul>
    3. 3. AGENDA <ul><li>Introductions and Overview of Workshop--Discovering and Exploring Habits of Mind </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on Students--their dispositions of learning </li></ul><ul><li>Habits of Mind: Their place in curriculum mapping </li></ul><ul><li>Activating and Engaging Habits of Mind </li></ul>
    4. 5. <ul><li>In what ways does this remind you of the students you teach? </li></ul><ul><li>In what ways does it remind you of your organization? </li></ul>
    5. 6. WHAT IS IT ABOUT YOUR STUDENTS THAT MAKES YOU THINK THEY NEED TO LEARN HOW TO THINK? <ul><li>What do you see them doing? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you hear them saying? </li></ul><ul><li>How are they feeling? </li></ul><ul><li>How would you like them to be? </li></ul>
    6. 7. HOW WE WOULD LIKE THEM TO BE
    7. 8. HABITS OF MIND Discussion <ul><li>READ AND DEFINE IT IN YOUR OWN WORDS </li></ul><ul><li>GIVE EXAMPLES: WHAT DO YOU HEAR PEOPLE SAYING OR SEE THEM DOING AS THEY USE THE HABIT OF MIND? </li></ul><ul><li>DESCRIBE SITUATIONS WHEN IT IS IMPORTANT TO USE THE HABIT OF MIND </li></ul><ul><li>POSE QUESTIONS INTENDED TO ELICIT THE HABIT OF MIND IN OTHERS </li></ul>
    8. 9. ON A CHART: <ul><li>TITLE </li></ul><ul><li>CREATE A SIMILE: “ …. (name the habit of mind) IS LIKE A…..…. BECAUSE……. ” </li></ul><ul><li>CREATE A LOGO OR SYMBOL FOR THE HABIT OF MIND </li></ul><ul><li>COMPOSE A BRIEF STATEMENT OR SLOGAN THAT SUMMARIZES THE HABIT OF MIND </li></ul>
    9. 10. <ul><li>COMPARE YOUR LIST OF ATTRIBUTES: </li></ul><ul><li>“ HOW WOULD YOU LIKE THEM TO BE? ” </li></ul><ul><li>WITH THE LIST OF HABITS OF MIND. </li></ul><ul><li>FIND SIMILARITIES </li></ul>
    10. 11. SHARING THE VISION
    11. 12. WHY HABITS OF MIND? <ul><li>TRANSDISCIPLINARY </li></ul><ul><li>AS GOOD FOR ADULTS AS THEY ARE FOR STUDENTS </li></ul><ul><li>FOCUSED ON LONG RANGE, ENDURING, ESSENTIAL LEARNINGS </li></ul><ul><li>EMPOWERS 21ST CENTURY SKILLS </li></ul>
    12. 14. THINK - PAIR - SHARE In what ways do the habits of mind empower the 21st century skills?
    13. 15. How many days does it take to break a habit?
    14. 17. <ul><li>“ HABIT IS A CABLE; WE WEAVE IT EACH DAY, AND AT LAST WE CANNOT BREAK IT. ” </li></ul>
    15. 18. CURRICULUM MIND SHIFTS <ul><li>FROM: </li></ul><ul><li>Not only knowing right answers. </li></ul><ul><li>TO: </li></ul><ul><li>Also knowing how to behave when answers are not immediately apparent. </li></ul>
    16. 19. THINKING SKILLS HABITS OF MIND COGNITIVE TASKS THAT DEMAND SKILLFUL THINKING EFFECTIVE THINKING REQUIREMENTS: CONTENT THINKING SKILLS
    17. 20. UNDERSTANDING: WHAT DO WE MEAN? “ He understands me ” . “ She understands French ” . “ Students understand the concept ” . “ She understands the laws of physics ” . “ We have an agreement of understanding ” . “ This is my understanding of the matter. ”
    18. 21. THINK - PAIR - SHARE <ul><li>What do you mean by “ understanding ” ? </li></ul><ul><li>What would you see/hear students doing if they “ understand? ” </li></ul><ul><li>Add your own thoughts </li></ul>
    19. 22. EVIDENCE OF UNDERSTANDING: <ul><li>CAN STUDENTS: </li></ul><ul><li>EXPLAIN IT ACCURATELY? </li></ul><ul><li>GIVE THEIR INTERPRETATION? </li></ul><ul><li>TAKE ANOTHER ’ S PERSPECTIVE? </li></ul><ul><li>EMPATHIZE? </li></ul><ul><li>ASK FURTHER QUESTIONS? </li></ul><ul><li>APPLY IT ELSEWHERE? </li></ul>
    20. 23. THINKING SKILLS EFFECTIVE THINKING REQUIREMENTS:
    21. 24. Thinking About Thinking <ul><li>Making Thinking Visible </li></ul><ul><li>Making Thinking Skills Visible </li></ul><ul><li>Making Habits of Mind Visible </li></ul>
    22. 25. Types of Thinking for Understanding <ul><li>Observing Closely and Describing What’s There </li></ul><ul><li>Building Explanations and Interpretations </li></ul><ul><li>Reasoning With Evidence </li></ul><ul><li>Making Connections </li></ul><ul><li>Considering Different Viewpoints and Perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>Capturing the Heart and Forming Conclusions </li></ul><ul><li>Wondering and Asking Questions </li></ul><ul><li>Uncovering </li></ul><ul><li>Complexity and Going Below the Surface of Things </li></ul>Richhart, Perkins, Tishman,Palmer Making Thinking Visible
    23. 26. Making Thinking Skills Visible <ul><li>Brainstorming with a Frame of Reference </li></ul><ul><li>Analyzing </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluating </li></ul><ul><li>Comparing and Contrasting </li></ul><ul><li>Making connections and analogies </li></ul><ul><li>Organizing and sequencing </li></ul>David Hyerle: Thinking Maps and Visual Tools
    24. 27. For Example <ul><li>Scientist </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Making and testing hypotheses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Observing closely </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Building explanations </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Mathematician </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Looking for patterns </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Making conjectures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Forming generalizations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Constructing arguments </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Reader </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Making interpretations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Making connections </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Making predictions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Historians </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Considering different perspectives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reasoning with evidence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Building explanations </li></ul></ul>
    25. 28. The Three Story Intellect <ul><li>There are one-story intellects, two story intellects, and three-story intellects with skylights. All fact collectors, who have no aim beyond their facts, are one-story men. </li></ul><ul><li>Two-story men compare, reason, generalize, using the labors of the fact collectors as well as their own. </li></ul><ul><li>Three-story men idealize, imagine, predict--their best illumination comes </li></ul><ul><li>from above, through the skylight. </li></ul>Oliver Wendell Holmes
    26. 29. The Three Story Intellect Complete Identify Observe Input Count List Recite Define Match Select Describe Name Scan
    27. 30. The Three Story Intellect Compare Distinguish Analyze Process Contrast Explain Synthesize Classify Infer Make analogies Sort Sequence Reason Complete Identify Observe Input Count List Recite Define Match Select Describe Name Scan
    28. 31. The Three Story Intellect Evaluate Predict Hypothesize Output Generate Speculate Forecast Imagine If/then Idealize Judge Apply a principle Compare Distinguish Analyze Process Contrast Explain Synthesize Classify Infer Make analogies Sort Sequence Reason Complete Identify Observe Input Count List Recite Define Match Select Describe Name Scan
    29. 32. LABELING THINKING SKILLS AND PROCESSES: E.g. <ul><li>&quot;Let's look at these two charts ” </li></ul>&quot;Let ’ s COMPARE these two charts. ” <ul><li>&quot;What do you think will happen when…? ” </li></ul>&quot;What do you PREDICT will happen when…? ” <ul><li>&quot;Lets work this problem.&quot; </li></ul>&quot;Let's ANALYZE this problem. ”
    30. 33. LABELING THINKING SKILLS AND PROCESSES: E.g. <ul><li>&quot;How do you know that's true? ” </li></ul>&quot;What EVIDENCE do you have to support..? ” <ul><li>&quot;How else could you use this…? ” </li></ul>” In what situations might you APPLY this…? ” <ul><li>“ Do you think that is the best alternative? </li></ul>“ As you EVALUATE these alternatives…. ”
    31. 34. LABELING THINKING SKILLS AND PROCESSES: E.g. <ul><li>&quot;What do you think would happen if… ” </li></ul>&quot;What do you SPECULATE might happen if… ” <ul><li>&quot;What did you think of this situation? ” </li></ul>&quot;What CONCLUSIONS might you draw ... <ul><li>&quot;How might you explain…?&quot; </li></ul>” How does your HYPOTHESIS explain…?
    32. 35. COGNITIVE TASKS THAT DEMAND SKILLFUL THINKING
    33. 36. LEARNING TASKS <ul><li>Engaging skillfully in a variety of authentic, rich activities that require strategic planning, creative approaches and the application of organized, multiple and complex thinking skills. </li></ul>
    34. 37. RICH TASKS REQUIRING SKILLFUL THINKING
    35. 38. Process for Projects Teaching for Tomorrow, McCain
    36. 40. Problem Definition <ul><li>Project Overview </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Present the challenge; the problem to be addressed </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Specifications </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Necessary elements to project </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do a K-W-L with students </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Evaluation Criteria </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rubric </li></ul></ul>
    37. 41. TYPES OF PROBLEMS <ul><li>GIVEN DATA--WHAT IS THE PROBLEM? </li></ul><ul><li>GIVEN DATA--WHAT IS THE PATTERN OR STORY? </li></ul><ul><li>LIFE ROLE (YOU ARE AN ARCHITECT) </li></ul><ul><li>THINKING BY ANALOGY--COMPARE AND CONTRAST </li></ul>
    38. 42. Always keep in mind <ul><li>Who is doing the real work? The students or the teacher? </li></ul><ul><li>Which habits of mind are you fostering in your design? </li></ul><ul><li>Does the work lend itself to group and individual? </li></ul><ul><li>What work should be done outside of the classroom and what work should be done in the classroom? </li></ul><ul><li>How will the students demonstrate what they have learned? Beware too many whole class presentations. </li></ul><ul><li>Are there any possibilities for people outside of the classroom serving as mentors or judges? </li></ul>09/01/11 Footer Text
    39. 43. Design <ul><li>Tasks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop a flow chart or action plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consider team interaction (wiki example) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Podcast </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Resources Needed </li></ul><ul><li>Learning Needed </li></ul><ul><li>Time Management Plan </li></ul>
    40. 44. Do <ul><li>Checking in with students </li></ul><ul><li>Coaching </li></ul><ul><li>Monitoring according to rubric, definition of problem, and design specs </li></ul>
    41. 45. Process Skills to Monitor for <ul><li>Time management </li></ul><ul><li>Project management </li></ul><ul><li>Research </li></ul><ul><li>Teamwork </li></ul><ul><li>Include in self-assessment along the way (formative assessment) </li></ul>
    42. 46. Debrief <ul><li>Self assessment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>According to rubric </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Against the definition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Against the design </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Allowing a revision to improve the quality of the work </li></ul>
    43. 48. ANALYSIS OF LESSON <ul><li>What math concepts were being learned in this lesson? </li></ul><ul><li>In which thinking skills were students engaging? </li></ul><ul><li>What was the nature of the task the students were performing? </li></ul><ul><li>Which habits of mind were students drawing upon? </li></ul>
    44. 49. NOT ANOTHER LAYER TO BE ADDED TO AN ALREADY OVERCROWDED CURRICULUM…. HABITS OF MIND:
    45. 50. RATHER, HABITS OF MIND ARE WOVEN THROUGHOUT THE CURRICULM AND THE SCHOOL. LIKE A TAPESTRY---
    46. 51. Map a Unit Essential Questions What are a few questions that would engage inquiry for your students? Content As you consider your curriculum, what are the most significant ideas you want the students to engage with? Skills When you say “engage” what specific thinking skills do you want to activate for students? HOM What might be some habits of mind that you would like to emphasize as the students engage in the work? Assessments What assessments might provide evidence of the learning in terms of content, skills, and essential questions? What assessments might show evidence of the development of habits of mind?
    47. 52. <ul><li>P aired </li></ul><ul><li>V erbal </li></ul><ul><li>F luency </li></ul>
    48. 54. 3. LISTENING WITH UNDERSTANDING AND EMPATHY Understand others! Devoting mental energies to understanding others ’ thoughts and feelings.
    49. 55. BUILDING CAPACITIES, EXTENDING VALUES and BUILDING COMMITMENT EXAMPLE: Listening with Understanding and Empathy
    50. 60. <ul><li>P ause </li></ul><ul><li>P araphrase </li></ul><ul><li>P robe </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Inquire </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Clarify </li></ul></ul>LISTENING SEQUENCE :
    51. 61. Pausing: <ul><li>Using wait-time before responding </li></ul><ul><li>to or asking a question allows time </li></ul><ul><li>for more complex thinking, enhances dialogue and improves decision making. </li></ul>
    52. 62. <ul><li>WAIT TIME </li></ul><ul><li>“ After having asked a question, the average teacher waits 1 second before either calling on a student, asking another question or answering the question him/herself . ” </li></ul><ul><li>Rowe, M. B. &quot;Wait Time and Rewards as Instructional Variables: </li></ul><ul><li>Their Influence on Language, Logic and Fate Control. &quot;Journal of Research, in Science Teaching 11, 2: 81 ‑ 84. (Spring 1974). </li></ul>
    53. 63. LEARNING TO WAIT <ul><li>Gauging how long to wait - </li></ul><ul><li>Watch the eyes! </li></ul><ul><li>Count backward from 3. </li></ul>
    54. 64. Paraphrasing: Lets others know that you are listening, that you understand or are trying to understand them and that you care.
    55. 65. Probing: Increases the clarity and precision of the group's thinking by refining understandings, terminology and interpretations.
    56. 66. Think Clearly! Striving for accurate communication in written and oral form. 9. THINKING AND COMMUNICATING WITH CLARITY AND PRECISION
    57. 68. THINKING AND COMMUNICATING WITH CLARITY AND PRECISION <ul><li>GENERALIZATIONS </li></ul><ul><li>DELETIONS </li></ul><ul><li>DISTORTIONS </li></ul>DEEP STRUCTURE LANGUAGE “ SURFACE LANGUAGE ”
    58. 76. Paying attention to self and others: <ul><li>Awareness of what you are saying, how it is said and how others are responding; attending to learning styles; being sensitive to your own and others' emotions. </li></ul>
    59. 77. <ul><ul><li>Speaker: Finish this sentence: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ AS I REFLECT ON THIS PAST SCHOOL YEAR, I AM MOST PROUD OF………” </li></ul></ul>Listener: Use the P ause, P araphrase P robe sequence
    60. 78. <ul><li>WHAT METACOGNITIVE STRATEGIES DID YOU EMPLOY TO MONITOR AND MANAGE YOUR LISTENING SKILLS? </li></ul>
    61. 79. <ul><ul><li>Speaker: Finish this sentence : </li></ul></ul><ul><li>“ AS I ANTICIPATE THIS NEXT SCHOOL YEAR, I ’ M MOST EXCITED ABOUT……. ” </li></ul>Listener: Use the P ause, P araphrase P robe sequence
    62. 81. <ul><li>WHAT VALUES ARE YOU EXPRESSING WHEN YOU LISTEN TO OTHERS SO INTENTLY? </li></ul>
    63. 82. PARAPHRASE WHAT YOU ’ VE LEARNED ABOUT THE, IMPORTANCE, EFFECTS AND MENTAL PROCESSES OF LISTENING WITH UNDERSTANDING AND EMPATHY
    64. 83. <ul><li>As you reflect on the day ’ s events, what key ideas do you want to remember that you will take back to your community/school/classroom ? </li></ul>JOURNAL REFLECTION

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