element adventure web quest element adventure web quest
1)  History of the Periodic Table ~  Mendeleev Autobiography Writing Assignment 2) Looking at an Atom ~ Play Battleship to...
HISTORY of the PERIODIC TABLE HISTORY of the PERIODIC TABLE Here you will read about a man named Dmitri Mendeleev, who cre...
Assignment 1:   Write a short one to two paragraph biography about Dmitri Mendeleev and his work.  Make sure that you take...
LOOKING at an ATOM LOOKING at an ATOM Nucleus:   the core of the atom that contains protons and neutrons Proton:  positive...
Atomic Number:   the atomic number tells you how many protons are in that atom's nucleus – example:  oxygen has an atomic ...
LOOKING at an ATOM LOOKING at an ATOM Go Play the Battleship Game by clicking on the word  Battleship  above.  When you ha...
PERIODIC TABLE PERIODIC TABLE The Periodic table is designed to help you predict what an element's physical and chemical p...
PERIODIC TABLE PERIODIC TABLE Groups or Families:   The vertical columns of the periodic table (there are 18) are called g...
METALS, NONMETALS & METALLOIDS METALS, NONMETALS & METALLOIDS Metals:   most elements are metals - 88 elements to the left...
Nonmetals:   nonmetals are found to the right of the stairstep  line - their characteristics are opposite those of metals ...
METALS, NONMETALS & METALLOIDS METALS, NONMETALS & METALLOIDS Metalloids:   elements on both sides of the zigzag line  hav...
METALS, NONMETALS & METALLOIDS METALS, NONMETALS & METALLOIDS After reading about metals, nonmetals and metalloids, write ...
You and your classmates have just graduated from college with an advertising degree.  The university’s Career Placement Of...
<ul><li>You will be judged by the partners of We Sell Anything Advertising Agency (your classmates) using a rubric devised...
PeriodicTable.com  ( periodictable.com )   WebElements  Clickable Periodic Table ( www.webelements.com )   Research Reserv...
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element ADventure web quest

  1. 1. element adventure web quest element adventure web quest
  2. 2. 1) History of the Periodic Table ~ Mendeleev Autobiography Writing Assignment 2) Looking at an Atom ~ Play Battleship to Review 3) How to Read a Periodic Table ~ Practice by Playing a Game 4) Metals, Nonmetals and Metalloids ~ Participate in a Discussion 5) Element ADventure ~ Create an advertisement YOUR ASSIGNMENT PLAN YOUR ASSIGNMENT PLAN
  3. 3. HISTORY of the PERIODIC TABLE HISTORY of the PERIODIC TABLE Here you will read about a man named Dmitri Mendeleev, who created the first Periodic Table of the Elements. After reading the information about Mendeleev’s life and work, you will write a short biography about Mendeleev’s life and career and post it to my science blog. Dmitri Mendeleev Mendeleev, a Russian scientist, is known as the father of the periodic table of elements. The periodic table of elements is an important tool used to help students and chemists understand and simplify the complex world of chemical reactions. Mendeleev dedicated his life to research and education and often educated people wherever he traveled. Mendeleev died on January 20 , 1907 at the age of 73. ( Click on Mendeleev’s picture to read more about him.)
  4. 4. Assignment 1: Write a short one to two paragraph biography about Dmitri Mendeleev and his work. Make sure that you take the information found and rewrite it in your own words. After you have it typed in Microsoft Word and have proofread and made any corrections, you may post it to the appropriate post on our classroom’s science blog by clicking on the link below. Science Blog
  5. 5. LOOKING at an ATOM LOOKING at an ATOM Nucleus: the core of the atom that contains protons and neutrons Proton: positively charged particles found inside the nucleus – also each atom of a particular element contains the same number of protons and is unique to that element (ex: oxygen always has 8 protons and its atomic number is always 8) Neutron: these particles found in the nucleus carry no electrical charge; therefore, they are neutral – not all atoms of a certain element will have the same number of neutrons – atoms of an element that have a different number of neutrons in the nucleus are called isotopes of each other Electron: these particles are negatively charged and orbit around the outside of the nucleus
  6. 6. Atomic Number: the atomic number tells you how many protons are in that atom's nucleus – example: oxygen has an atomic number of 8, meaning that there are 8 protons in the nucleus of an atom of oxygen Atomic Mass: because atoms are so small, their masses cannot be measured in grams or milligrams - scientists created the atomic mass unit (amu) to measure mass of subatomic particles, and the mass of a proton or a neutron is about 1 amu while the mass of an electron is about 1/2000 amu. To find the atomic mass of an atom, add the number of protons and neutrons in the nucleus . LOOKING at an ATOM LOOKING at an ATOM O Oxygen 8
  7. 7. LOOKING at an ATOM LOOKING at an ATOM Go Play the Battleship Game by clicking on the word Battleship above. When you have won, raise your hand and let me see. Assignment 2: Battleship
  8. 8. PERIODIC TABLE PERIODIC TABLE The Periodic table is designed to help you predict what an element's physical and chemical properties are. You can also predict what elements will bond with each other. First, let's look at the columns and rows of the periodic table.
  9. 9. PERIODIC TABLE PERIODIC TABLE Groups or Families: The vertical columns of the periodic table (there are 18) are called groups or families. Elements in the same group or family have similar but not identical characteristics. You can know properties of a certain element by knowing which group it belongs to. Periods: The horizontal rows of the periodic table are called periods. Elements in a period are not alike in properties. As a rule, the first element in a period is usually an active solid, and the last element in a period is always an inactive gas. Atomic size decreases from left to right across a period, but atomic mass increases from left to right across a period. Atoms on the left of the period, therefore, are usually larger and more lightweight than the smaller, heavier atoms on the right of the period. Assignment 3: Omit this assignment because of our time constraint. Move on to the next assignment.
  10. 10. METALS, NONMETALS & METALLOIDS METALS, NONMETALS & METALLOIDS Metals: most elements are metals - 88 elements to the left of the stairstep line are metals or metal like elements. Physical Properties of Metals: Luster (shininess) Good conductors of heat and electricity High density (heavy for their size) High melting point Ductile (most metals can be drawn out into thin wires) Malleable (most metals can be hammered into thin sheets) Chemical Properties of Metals: Easily lose electrons Corrode easily. Corrosion is a gradual wearing away. (Example: silver tarnishing and iron rusting)
  11. 11. Nonmetals: nonmetals are found to the right of the stairstep line - their characteristics are opposite those of metals Physical Properties of Nonmetals: No luster (dull appearance) Poor conductor of heat and electricity Brittle (breaks easily) Not ductile Not malleable Low density Low melting point Chemical Properties of Nonmetals: Tend to gain electrons Since metals tend to lose electrons and nonmetals tend to gain electrons, metals and nonmetals like to form compounds with each other. These compounds are called ionic compounds. When two or more nonmetals bond with each other, they form a covalent compound. METALS, NONMETALS & METALLOIDS METALS, NONMETALS & METALLOIDS
  12. 12. METALS, NONMETALS & METALLOIDS METALS, NONMETALS & METALLOIDS Metalloids: elements on both sides of the zigzag line have properties of both metals and nonmetals - these elements are called metalloids. Physical Properties of Metalloids: Solids Can be shiny or dull Ductile Malleable Conduct heat and electricity better than nonmetals but not as well as metals
  13. 13. METALS, NONMETALS & METALLOIDS METALS, NONMETALS & METALLOIDS After reading about metals, nonmetals and metalloids, write me a paragraph explaining what these three things are. Post it to the science blog under the Metals, Nonmetals & Metalloids Posting. Make sure you write in complete sentences, each of which starting with a capital letter and ending with a punctuation mark. Assignment 4: Science Blog
  14. 14. You and your classmates have just graduated from college with an advertising degree. The university’s Career Placement Office has received a request from We Sell Anything, one of the most elite advertising agencies. They have two positions to fill with bright, young advertising graduates. Your task is to prepare an advertising sample for the partners to look at. You must develop a commercial which “sells” a selected element (which will be selected in a blind drawing) from the Periodic Table. Commercials will then be presented live in front of the partners (your classmates) who will then select the two most qualified applicants for their new luxury career. Good Luck! Assignment 5:
  15. 15. <ul><li>You will be judged by the partners of We Sell Anything Advertising Agency (your classmates) using a rubric devised and voted on by your classmates. </li></ul>Commercial & Presentation Requirements Commercials should be: 1-2 minutes long an advertisement for your element (will be chosen by a blind draw) creative and interesting Commercials should make reference to: <ul><li>The element’s name </li></ul><ul><li>The element’s symbol </li></ul><ul><li>At least 8 other researched physical and chemical properties of the element should be mentioned. These properties may include, but are not limited to: </li></ul><ul><li>Texture </li></ul><ul><li>Ability to conduct electricity </li></ul><ul><li>Density </li></ul><ul><li>The element’s atomic number </li></ul><ul><li>The element’s atomic mass </li></ul><ul><li>Boiling point </li></ul><ul><li>Phase of matter at room temp </li></ul><ul><li>Luster </li></ul><ul><li>Melting point </li></ul><ul><li>Hardness </li></ul><ul><li>Malleability </li></ul><ul><li>Density </li></ul><ul><li>When the element was discovered and/or created, if this information is know </li></ul><ul><li>Common historical and/or modern uses for this element </li></ul>
  16. 16. PeriodicTable.com ( periodictable.com ) WebElements Clickable Periodic Table ( www.webelements.com ) Research Reservoir Use the following websites to help you research your element as you prepare for your commercial presentation. Of course, you are not limited to the use of the internet for your research. Please feel free to search in textbooks, encyclopedias, journals, etc. as you research your element. Click on the following links to browse sites related to the periodic table and specific elements.

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