Erving Goffman and ‘case of’ the Dramaturgical Analogy ‘ All the World is a stage’  (from As You Like It by Shakespeare)
Society as Drama <ul><li>We are constantly expressing ourselves to others </li></ul><ul><li>We control the view they have ...
<ul><li>We want others to believe our performance – to get the right impression </li></ul><ul><li>There must be no weaknes...
Props <ul><li>We use props to make  </li></ul><ul><li>our acting more believable </li></ul><ul><li>Help us to create our i...
Front stage = these are the areas where we are maintaining our impressions and performing
Backstage = this is where we relax and let our impression slip so that it may contradict our front stage persona.  It may ...
Sometimes the mask slips and we jeopardise our performance Other actors in the social drama may conspire with us to cover ...
Role Distance <ul><li>Roles are not scripted – we create and define them via interaction </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes we di...
Roles and POWER <ul><li>There are inequalities in roles in society </li></ul><ul><li>However power is not fixed, it is con...
Strengths (Symbolic Interactionism) <ul><li>Not deterministic </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasises the conscious involvement of th...
Weaknesses – Symbolic Interactionism <ul><li>Ignores the influence of social structure </li></ul><ul><li>Some factors affe...
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Erving Gofffman

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Erving Gofffman

  1. 1. Erving Goffman and ‘case of’ the Dramaturgical Analogy ‘ All the World is a stage’ (from As You Like It by Shakespeare)
  2. 2. Society as Drama <ul><li>We are constantly expressing ourselves to others </li></ul><ul><li>We control the view they have of us because we are worried what they will think of us </li></ul><ul><li>This process is called Impression Management </li></ul><ul><li>We are involved in interpersonal communication with others </li></ul><ul><li>We pay attention to non-verbal signals as an indicator of true feelings </li></ul><ul><li>We do not take things at face value </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>We want others to believe our performance – to get the right impression </li></ul><ul><li>There must be no weaknesses </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes we believe ourselves and other times we find ourselves unconvincing </li></ul><ul><li>We perform for ourselves and others </li></ul>Performance
  4. 4. Props <ul><li>We use props to make </li></ul><ul><li>our acting more believable </li></ul><ul><li>Help us to create our image </li></ul><ul><li>What props do you use? </li></ul>
  5. 5. Front stage = these are the areas where we are maintaining our impressions and performing
  6. 6. Backstage = this is where we relax and let our impression slip so that it may contradict our front stage persona. It may also serve as an alternative front stage for another performance we are giving
  7. 7. Sometimes the mask slips and we jeopardise our performance Other actors in the social drama may conspire with us to cover these up – we work as teams At other times this leads to us retiring from that role
  8. 8. Role Distance <ul><li>Roles are not scripted – we create and define them via interaction </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes we distance ourselves from a role by doing something OUT OF CHARACTER </li></ul><ul><li>This shows others that we are more than just one role </li></ul><ul><li>We may combine elements of our ‘self’ in other roles to create our own version </li></ul>
  9. 9. Roles and POWER <ul><li>There are inequalities in roles in society </li></ul><ul><li>However power is not fixed, it is constantly acted out </li></ul><ul><li>Social institutions serve to limit us in our roles </li></ul><ul><li>The self moves between the external limits of our roles and our inner needs </li></ul><ul><li>Hierarchy and Institutions are a factor in forging our individuality </li></ul>
  10. 10. Strengths (Symbolic Interactionism) <ul><li>Not deterministic </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasises the conscious involvement of the actor in social life </li></ul><ul><li>Recognises that social contact is meaningful </li></ul><ul><li>Identifies the need for understanding action in social situations </li></ul>
  11. 11. Weaknesses – Symbolic Interactionism <ul><li>Ignores the influence of social structure </li></ul><ul><li>Some factors affect humans in society whether they recognise them or not (Blumer) </li></ul><ul><li>Exaggerates the extent to which humans interpret their environment – most of the time we act on auto-pilot or out of habit </li></ul><ul><li>Only in new situations do we consciously interpret and define the world we find ourselves in </li></ul>

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