Cubism

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Cubism

  1. 1. Cubism 1901-1914 By: Jessica Pearson
  2. 2. Some of the Artist who started Cubism <ul><li>The leading artists of the time were Pablo Picasso and George Braque , and the movement evolved into separating 3-D subjects before analytically reshaping there forms into other viewpoints. </li></ul><ul><li>The main influences were said to be tribal art and the art of Paul Cezanne . </li></ul>
  3. 3. Other Artists of Cubism <ul><li>Juan Gris </li></ul><ul><li>Robert Delaunay </li></ul><ul><li>Albert Gleizes </li></ul><ul><li>Fernand Legar </li></ul><ul><li>Jean Metzinger </li></ul>
  4. 4. Characteristics of Cubism <ul><li>The basics of cubism can be seen in another art movement known as pointillism. </li></ul><ul><li>Cubism is basically the art of creating abstract shapes of three dimensional objects on a two dimensional surface. </li></ul><ul><li>A cubist artist or a painter basically shows more than one view at a time. </li></ul><ul><li>The overall look of a painting that is created in this style appears in the form of little cubes -that is where it gets the name. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Two Phases of Cubism: <ul><li>Analytical 1907-1912 </li></ul><ul><li>Synthetic 1912-1919 </li></ul>
  6. 6. Analytical Cubism <ul><li>This type of cubism is hard to interpret and is very ambiguous. </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;analyzed“ cubism is natural forms that are reduced into basic geometric parts on a two-dimensional picture plane. </li></ul><ul><li>Color is non-existent except for the use of a monochromatic scheme that often included grey and blue. </li></ul><ul><li>Analytic cubists focused on forms like the cylinder, sphere and the cone to represent the natural world. </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Analytical cubism show similarities to one another. </li></ul><ul><li>They also share many of the same colors. </li></ul>Analytical cubism is hard to understand what it is you are looking at. Portrait of Ambroise Vollard Pablo Picasso (1910) Les Demoiselles d’ Avignon Pablo Picasso (1907)
  8. 8. Synthetic Cubism <ul><li>Synthetic Cubism grew out of Analytical Cubism and the experimental nature of collage . </li></ul><ul><li>Synthetic Cubism developed through a construction process. </li></ul><ul><li>It is also more decorative and appealing and somewhat easier to interpret. </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Synthetic Cubism is much easier to interpret. </li></ul><ul><li>The colors used in synthetic cubism is much different than analytical because it is more brighter. </li></ul>Woman in an Armchair Pablo Picasso (1913) Three Musicians Painting Pablo Picasso (1921)
  10. 10. <ul><li>The Violin and the Palette </li></ul><ul><li>George Braque (1909) </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>Houses at L’ Estaque </li></ul><ul><li>George Braque (1908) </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Bibemus Quarry </li></ul><ul><li>Paul Cezanne (1895) </li></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>Violin and Glass </li></ul><ul><li>Juan Gris (1915) </li></ul>
  14. 14. <ul><li>Les Belles Cyclistes </li></ul><ul><li>Fernand Legar 1944 </li></ul>
  15. 15. Works Cited <ul><li>www.artyfactory.com/.../art_movements/cubism.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.angelfire.com/va3/hwdg/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.artcyclopedia.com/history/cubism.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.buzzle.com/articles/characteristics-of-cubism.html </li></ul>

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