Chapter  3, section 1
<ul><li>&quot;We please ourselves with the prospect of exporting in a few years a good quantity from hence, and supplying ...
<ul><li>Concept of mercantilism – country’s ultimate goal was self-sufficiency and that all countries were in competition ...
Colony Region Economic  activity Massachusetts New England Shipbuilding, shipping, fishing, lumber, rum, meat New Hampshir...
<ul><li>By mid 1600s not all exportation was to Britain </li></ul><ul><li>Britain enforced tarifs – outside trade was thre...
<ul><li>1684 – King Charles II punished violators of Navigation Acts – mostly wealthy Massachusetts merchants </li></ul><u...
<ul><li>“ You have no more privileges left you, than not to be sold for slaves.”  </li></ul><ul><li>-Sir Edmund Andros </l...
<ul><li>King James II, a Catholic, takes over thrown in 1685 </li></ul><ul><li>His Catholic beliefs affected outlook in Br...
<ul><li>Parliament has power over any religious monarch – passed in law </li></ul><ul><li>Act of Union signed in 1707 – jo...
<ul><li>Attention turned towards France – becoming leading force in Europe </li></ul><ul><li>Less money for soldiers in co...
<ul><li>What consequences are there for loosening their control?  </li></ul><ul><li>Did they have a choice? </li></ul><ul>...
<ul><li>How did political events in England affect the lives of the colonists? </li></ul><ul><li>Did Britain need the colo...
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Chapter 3, Section 1 Colonial England

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notes on chapter 3, section 1 - colonial england in the new world

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Chapter 3, Section 1 Colonial England

  1. 1. Chapter 3, section 1
  2. 2. <ul><li>&quot;We please ourselves with the prospect of exporting in a few years a good quantity from hence, and supplying our mother country [Great Britain] with a manufacture for which she has so great a demand, and which she is now supplied with from the French colonies, and many thousand pounds per annum [year] thereby lost to the nation, when she might as well be supplied here, if the matter were applied to in earnest.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Did everyone have this same mentality? </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Concept of mercantilism – country’s ultimate goal was self-sufficiency and that all countries were in competition to acquire the most gold and silver </li></ul><ul><li>What did the colonies get in return? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Wool, wrought iron, steel </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ The American is apparelled from head to foot in our manufactures…he scarcely drinks, sits, moves, labours or recreates himself, without contributing to the emolument of the mother country.” </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Colony Region Economic activity Massachusetts New England Shipbuilding, shipping, fishing, lumber, rum, meat New Hampshire New England Ship masts, lumber, fishing, trade, shipping, livestock, foodstuffs Connecticut New England Rum, iron foundries, shipbuilding Rhode Island New England Snuff, livestock New York Middle Furs, wheat, glass, shoes, livestock, shipping, shipbuilding, rum, beer, snuff Delaware Middle Trade, foodstuffs New Jersey Middle Trade, foodstuffs, copper Pennsylvania Middle Flax, shipbuilding Virginia Southern Tobacco, wheat, cattle, iron Maryland Southern Tobacco, wheat, snuff North Carolina Southern Naval supplies, tobacco, furs South Carolina Southern Rice, indigo, silk Georgia Southern Indigo, rice, naval supplies, lumber
  5. 5. <ul><li>By mid 1600s not all exportation was to Britain </li></ul><ul><li>Britain enforced tarifs – outside trade was threat </li></ul><ul><li>1651 Parliament formed and the acts – four parts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1-no country to trade with colonies unless goods either in colonial or English ships </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2-ships operated by at least ¾ English or colonial </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3-certain products only exported to England </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4-goods traded b/w colonies and Europe had to pass through English port </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>1684 – King Charles II punished violators of Navigation Acts – mostly wealthy Massachusetts merchants </li></ul><ul><li>Mass. Becomes royal colony instead of Puritan utopia </li></ul><ul><li>Land from Maine to New Jersey becomes one colony called Dominion of New England </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Why might have King Charles II done this? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What did this mean for colonists economically and socially? </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>“ You have no more privileges left you, than not to be sold for slaves.” </li></ul><ul><li>-Sir Edmund Andros </li></ul><ul><li>-appointed by King James II to put the pressure on colonists to cooperate </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>King James II, a Catholic, takes over thrown in 1685 </li></ul><ul><li>His Catholic beliefs affected outlook in Britain </li></ul><ul><li>Would Britain go back to Catholic monarch? </li></ul><ul><li>Parliament scared, invited William of Orange and James’s daughter Mary to take over </li></ul><ul><li>James fled; 1689 Parliament gave William and Mary thrown – the Glorious Revolution </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Parliament has power over any religious monarch – passed in law </li></ul><ul><li>Act of Union signed in 1707 – joining Scotland to England and Wales…today devoltionized </li></ul><ul><li>In colony world, Massachusetts colonists arrested Andros, restored colonies’ charters </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>Attention turned towards France – becoming leading force in Europe </li></ul><ul><li>Less money for soldiers in colonies </li></ul><ul><li>Smuggling trials now looked over by English judges; Board of Trade – monitor colonial trade </li></ul><ul><li>Became Salutary neglect: England relaxed enforcement of most regulations so to get continued economic loyalty of colonies </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>What consequences are there for loosening their control? </li></ul><ul><li>Did they have a choice? </li></ul><ul><li>“ The time may come…when the colonies may become populous and with the increase of arts and sciences strong and politic, forgetting their relation to the mother countries, will then confederate and consider nothing further than the means to support their ambition of standing on their [own] legs.” </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>How did political events in England affect the lives of the colonists? </li></ul><ul><li>Did Britain need the colonies? Why do you think they loosened their “reign” on them? </li></ul><ul><li>Britain established policies to control the American colonies but was inconsistent in its enforcement of those policies. What results might be expected from such inconsistency? </li></ul>

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