Tar2 Chapter 27

6,010 views

Published on

Chapt 27

Published in: Education
0 Comments
6 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
6,010
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
291
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
130
Comments
0
Likes
6
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Tar2 Chapter 27

  1. 1. Splash Screen
  2. 2. Contents Chapter Introduction Section 1 The Nixon Administration Section 2 The Watergate Scandal Section 3 Ford and Carter Section 4 The “Me” Decade: Life in the 1970s Chapter Summary Chapter Assessment Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slides.
  3. 3. Intro 1 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  4. 4. Intro 2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Chapter Objectives <ul><li>Describe Nixon’s domestic agenda. </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss Nixon’s foreign policy achievements. </li></ul>Section 1: The Nixon Agenda
  5. 5. Intro 3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Chapter Objectives Section 2: The Watergate Scandal <ul><li>Describe the character of Richard Nixon and the attitude of his White House. </li></ul><ul><li>Explain the Watergate scandal and discuss its effects. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Intro 4 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Chapter Objectives Section 3: Ford and Carter <ul><li>Explain the reasons for economic troubles in the United States during the 1970s. </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss Jimmy Carter’s domestic and foreign policies. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Intro 5 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Chapter Objectives Section 4: The “Me” Decade: Life in the 1970s <ul><li>Explain the emergence of new spiritual movements and religions. </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss the disappearance of some traditional values during the 1970s. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Intro 6 Why It Matters The protests of the 1960s were passionate and sometimes violent. The nation elected President Nixon on a promise to uphold the values of what Nixon called “Middle America.” In foreign policy, Nixon charted a new path with a historic visit to China. At home he introduced “New Federalism.” In 1974 the Watergate scandal forced Nixon to resign. Presidents Ford and Carter faced an economic downturn and a major energy crisis.
  9. 9. Intro 7 The Impact Today Experiences of the 1970s have had an impact today. <ul><li>The Watergate scandal has left many Americans less confident in political leaders. </li></ul><ul><li>The Department of Energy, created by President Carter, still exists as a cabinet-level agency. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  10. 10. Intro 8 continued on next slide
  11. 11. Intro 9
  12. 12. End of Intro
  13. 13. Section 1-1 Guide to Reading President Nixon sought to restore law and order and traditional values at home and to ease Cold War tensions abroad. <ul><li>Southern strategy </li></ul>Main Idea Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Key Terms and Names <ul><li>revenue sharing </li></ul><ul><li>impound </li></ul><ul><li>Henry Kissinger </li></ul><ul><li>détente </li></ul><ul><li>summit </li></ul>
  14. 14. Section 1-2 Guide to Reading (cont.) Reading Strategy Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Organizing As you read about President Nixon’s administration, complete a graphic organizer similar to the one on page 832 of your textbook by listing his domestic and foreign policies. <ul><li>Describe Nixon’s domestic agenda. </li></ul>Reading Objectives <ul><li>Discuss Nixon’s foreign policy achievements. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Section 1-3 Guide to Reading (cont.) Section Theme Global Connections One of President Nixon’s most dramatic accomplishments was changing the relationship between the United States, Communist China, and the Soviet Union.
  16. 16. Section 1-4 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  17. 17. Section 1-5 Appealing to Middle America Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Many Americans supported the government and longed for an end to the violence of the 1960s. </li></ul><ul><li>The 1968 Republican presidential candidate, Richard Nixon, appealed to the people whom he called “Middle America.” </li></ul><ul><li>He promised them peace in Vietnam, law and order, a streamlined government, and a return to conservative values. </li></ul>(pages 832–835)
  18. 18. Section 1-6 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>The Democratic nominee, Hubert Humphrey, and a third party-candidate, George Wallace, could not stop Nixon. </li></ul><ul><li>He won, receiving 43.4 percent of the popular vote. </li></ul>Appealing to Middle America (cont.) (pages 832–835)
  19. 19. Section 1-7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Much of Nixon’s success in the election came from the South. </li></ul><ul><li>Nixon had promised to appoint conservatives to the federal courts, to name a Southerner to the Supreme Court, to oppose court-ordered busing, and to choose a vice president acceptable to the South. </li></ul><ul><li>As a result, a large number of white Southerners left the Democratic Party and voted for Nixon. </li></ul>Appealing to Middle America (cont.) (pages 832–835)
  20. 20. Section 1-8 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>After his election victory, Nixon began the Southern strategy to win even more Southerners to the Republican Party. </li></ul><ul><li>He took steps to slow desegregation. </li></ul><ul><li>To keep his promise of law and order, Nixon set out to battle American crime. Nixon criticized the Supreme Court regarding expanded rights for accused criminals. </li></ul><ul><li>He appointed several conservative judges to the Supreme Court, including one from the South. </li></ul>Appealing to Middle America (cont.) (pages 832–835)
  21. 21. Section 1-9 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Nixon’s Republican leaders dismantled several federal programs and gave more control to state and local governments. </li></ul><ul><li>Under Nixon’s New Federalism program, Congress passed a series of revenue-sharing bills that provided federal funds to state and local agencies. </li></ul><ul><li>Intended to give state and local agencies increased power, it actually led to a greater dependency on federal funds. </li></ul>Appealing to Middle America (cont.) (pages 832–835)
  22. 22. Section 1-10 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>In 1969 Nixon proposed replacing the existing Aid to Families with Dependant Children (AFDC) welfare program with the Family Assistance Plan. </li></ul><ul><li>The plan would give needy families a guaranteed yearly grant of $1,600. </li></ul><ul><li>The program won House approval but was later defeated in the Senate. </li></ul>Appealing to Middle America (cont.) (pages 832–835)
  23. 23. Section 1-11 Why did Richard Nixon appeal to “Middle America” in the 1968 presidential election? He aimed many of his campaign messages to “Middle America.” He promised them “peace with honor” in Vietnam, law and order, a streamlined government, and a return to more conservative times. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Appealing to Middle America (cont.) (pages 832–835)
  24. 24. Section 1-12 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Nixon’s Foreign Policy <ul><li>President Nixon’s administration focused mainly on the subject of foreign affairs. </li></ul><ul><li>Nixon chose former Harvard professor Henry Kissinger as his national security adviser. </li></ul><ul><li>Nixon and Kissinger put their foreign policy in place and attempted friendlier relations with the Soviet Union and China. </li></ul>(pages 835–837)
  25. 25. Section 1-13 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Nixon was anti-Communist but came to reject the idea of a bipolar world with the United States and the Soviet Union confronting each other. </li></ul><ul><li>Nixon felt the “multipolar” world would need a different approach. </li></ul><ul><li>With the help of Kissinger, Nixon created the approach of détente, or relaxation of tensions between the United States and its two major Communist rivals–the Soviet Union and China. </li></ul>Nixon’s Foreign Policy (cont.) (pages 835–837)
  26. 26. Section 1-14 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Nixon argued that the United States had to build a better relationship with its rivals to ensure world peace. </li></ul><ul><li>To ease tensions with China, Nixon lifted trade and travel restrictions and withdrew the Seventh Fleet from defending Taiwan. </li></ul><ul><li>In February 1972, Nixon took a historic trip to China, where both leaders agreed to better relations between the nations. </li></ul>Nixon’s Foreign Policy (cont.) (pages 835–837)
  27. 27. Section 1-15 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>After learning of the negotiations between the United States and China, the Soviet Union suggested an American-Soviet summit, or high-level diplomatic meeting, in May 1972. </li></ul><ul><li>Nixon became the first president since World War II to visit the Soviet Union. </li></ul><ul><li>During the summit, the countries signed the first Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty (SALT I) to limit nuclear arms. </li></ul>Nixon’s Foreign Policy (cont.) (pages 835–837)
  28. 28. Section 1-16 <ul><li>The countries agreed to increase trade and the exchange of scientific information. </li></ul>Nixon’s Foreign Policy (cont.) (pages 835–837)
  29. 29. Section 1-17 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. What views on foreign policy did President Nixon and his national security adviser Henry Kissinger share? Both believed in a gradual withdrawal from Vietnam, a practical approach to foreign policy to continue to contain communism, and the use of engagement and negotiations to achieve international goals. Nixon’s Foreign Policy (cont.) (pages 835–837)
  30. 30. Section 1-18 Checking for Understanding __ 1. to take possession __ 2. a meeting of heads of government __ 3. a policy which attempts to relax or ease tensions between nations A. impound B. détente C. summit Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. C B A
  31. 31. Section 1-19 Checking for Understanding (cont.) Describe Nixon’s New Federalism policy. He granted federal funds to state and local agencies. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  32. 32. Section 1-20 Reviewing Themes Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Global Connections What were the results of Nixon’s policy of détente? Détente eased tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union and led to more normal relations between the U.S. and China.
  33. 33. Section 1-21 Critical Thinking Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Evaluating How did Nixon’s China visit affect Soviet relations? The Soviet Union became more accommodating to the United States.
  34. 34. Section 1-22 Analyzing Visuals Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Analyzing Political Cartoons Study the cartoon on page 836 of your textbook. What is the artist’s message about the impact of the arms buildup on the average citizen in both the Soviet Union and the United States? The arms race burdened citizens.
  35. 35. Section 1-23 Close Discuss Nixon’s foreign policy achievements.
  36. 36. End of Section 1
  37. 37. Section 2-1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading During his second term, President Nixon became embroiled in a scandal that ultimately forced him to resign. <ul><li>Sam J. Ervin </li></ul>Main Idea Key Terms and Names <ul><li>John Dean </li></ul><ul><li>executive privilege </li></ul><ul><li>impeach </li></ul><ul><li>Federal Campaign Act Amendments </li></ul>
  38. 38. Section 2-2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading (cont.) Reading Strategy Taking Notes As you read about the Watergate scandal, use the major headings of the section to create an outline similar to the one on page 838 of your textbook. <ul><li>Describe the character of Richard Nixon and the attitude of his White House. </li></ul>Reading Objectives <ul><li>Explain the Watergate scandal and discuss its effects. </li></ul>
  39. 39. Section 2-3 Guide to Reading (cont.) Section Theme Government and Democracy The Watergate scandal intensified the lingering distrust of government that had grown in the United States during the Vietnam War.
  40. 40. Section 2-4 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  41. 41. Section 2-5 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The Roots of Watergate Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>The Watergate scandal began as the Nixon administration attempted to cover up its involvement in the break-in at the Democratic National Committee (DNC) headquarters, as well as other illegal actions committed during Nixon’s re-election campaign. </li></ul><ul><li>Richard Nixon had become defensive, secretive, and resentful of his critics during his long and difficult climb to the presidency. </li></ul>(pages 838–840)
  42. 42. Section 2-6 <ul><li>He went as far as creating an “enemies list,” naming people from politicians to members of the media. </li></ul><ul><li>In an effort to win re-election, Nixon and his team looked for ways to gain an edge anyway they could. </li></ul><ul><li>On June 17, 1972, five Nixon supporters broke into the Democratic Party’s headquarters to locate campaign information and install wiretaps on telephones. </li></ul>The Roots of Watergate (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 838–840)
  43. 43. Section 2-7 <ul><li>Discovered by a security guard, the burglars were arrested. </li></ul><ul><li>One of the burglars, James McCord, was an ex-CIA official and a member of the Committee for the Re-election of the President (CRP). </li></ul><ul><li>As the questions about the break-ins began, the cover-up started. </li></ul><ul><li>Although it is thought that Nixon did not order the break-in, it is believed that he did order the cover-up. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The Roots of Watergate (cont.) (pages 838–840)
  44. 44. Section 2-8 <ul><li>Most Americans believed the president when he claimed he had no involvement in the break-in, and Nixon won re-election in 1972. </li></ul>The Roots of Watergate (cont.) (pages 838–840)
  45. 45. Section 2-9 Why was Nixon’s hope of re-election uncertain? Although he had a high approval rating after the summit meetings, the unpopular Vietnam War still dragged on. Nixon’s staff was worried about the close margin of the 1968 victory. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. The Roots of Watergate (cont.) (pages 838–840)
  46. 46. Section 2-10 The Cover-Up Unravels Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>In 1973 the Watergate burglars went on trial. </li></ul><ul><li>Defendant James McCord agreed to cooperate with the grand jury investigation and the Senate’s Select Committee on Presidential Campaign Activities, established under Senator Sam J. Ervin of North Carolina. </li></ul><ul><li>McCord’s testimony created a floodgate of confessions, and officials and White House staff exposed illegalities. </li></ul>(pages 840–842)
  47. 47. Section 2-11 <ul><li>Counsel to the president John Dean leveled allegations against Nixon himself. </li></ul><ul><li>John Dean testified before Senator Erwin’s committee that Attorney General John Mitchell ordered the Watergate break-in and Nixon was active in its cover-up. </li></ul>The Cover-Up Unravels (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 840–842)
  48. 48. Section 2-12 <ul><li>On July 16, White House aide Alexander Butterfield testified that Nixon had ordered a taping system installed in the White House to record all conversations to help him write his memoirs once he left office. </li></ul><ul><li>These tapes were sought by all groups investigating the scandal. Nixon refused to hand over the tapes, pleading executive privilege –the principle that White House conversations be kept confidential to protect national security. </li></ul>The Cover-Up Unravels (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 840–842)
  49. 49. Section 2-13 <ul><li>In the fall of 1973, Vice President Spiro Agnew was forced to resign after it was discovered he had taken bribes from state contractors while governor of Maryland. </li></ul><ul><li>The Republican leader of the House of Representatives, Gerald Ford, became the new vice president. </li></ul>The Cover-Up Unravels (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 840–842)
  50. 50. Section 2-14 <ul><li>Nixon released edited transcripts of the tapes in April 1974, claiming they proved him innocent. </li></ul><ul><li>Investigators went to court again to force Nixon to turn over unedited tapes. </li></ul><ul><li>In July the Supreme Court ruled that Nixon had to turn over the unedited tapes. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The Cover-Up Unravels (cont.) (pages 840–842)
  51. 51. Section 2-15 <ul><li>The House Judiciary Committee voted to impeach, or officially charge Nixon of presidential misconduct. </li></ul><ul><li>On one of the tapes was found evidence that Nixon had ordered the CIA to stop the FBI’s investigation of the break-in. </li></ul><ul><li>On August 9, 1974, Nixon resigned, and Gerald Ford became the 38th president of the United States. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The Cover-Up Unravels (cont.) (pages 840–842)
  52. 52. Section 2-16 What did the House Judiciary Committee charge against Nixon? Nixon was charged with obstructing justice in the Watergate cover-up, misuse of federal agencies to violate the rights of citizens, and defying the authority of Congress by not turning over the tapes and other materials the committee had requested. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. The Cover-Up Unravels (cont.) (pages 840–842)
  53. 53. Section 2-17 The Impact of Watergate Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Watergate prompted the implementation of several new laws limiting the power of the executive branch and reestablishing a greater balance of power. </li></ul><ul><li>The Federal Campaign Act Amendments limited campaign contributions and set up an independent agency to administer stricter election laws. </li></ul><ul><li>The Ethics in Government Act required financial disclosure by high government officials in all three branches of government. </li></ul>(page 842)
  54. 54. Section 2-18 <ul><li>The FBI Domestic Security Investigation Guidelines restricted the bureau’s political intelligence-gathering activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Watergate left Americans distrustful of public officials. </li></ul><ul><li>Other Americans felt that Nixon’s impeachment and resignation proved that in the United States, no one is above the law. </li></ul>The Impact of Watergate (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (page 842)
  55. 55. Section 2-19 What did the Watergate scandal do to Americans? It left many Americans with a deep distrust of public officials. Some Americans felt that Nixon’s impeachment and resignation proved that in the United States, no one is above the law. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. The Impact of Watergate (cont.) (page 842)
  56. 56. Section 2-20 Checking for Understanding __ 1. principle stating that communications of the executive branch should remain confidential to protect national security __ 2. to formally charge a public official with misconduct in office A. executive privilege B. impeach Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. B A
  57. 57. Section 2-21 Checking for Understanding (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Evaluate the effects of the Watergate scandal on the way American citizens viewed the federal government. Many citizens distrusted the federal government, especially the presidency, while some saw the events as proof that no one is above the law.
  58. 58. Section 2-22 Reviewing Themes Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Government and Democracy How did the Watergate scandal alter the balance of power between the executive and legislative branches of government? It led to laws that limit the power of the executive branch.
  59. 59. Section 2-23 Critical Thinking Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Evaluating How did the discovery of the White House tapes change the Watergate cover-up investigation? It led to an abuse of executive privilege, but resulted in proof of Nixon’s guilt.
  60. 60. Section 2-24 Analyzing Visuals Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Analyzing Photographs Study the photograph on page 841 of your textbook. How would you describe the scene of Nixon’s leave-taking? What in the photo suggests that this is a formal occasion? Why do you think this ceremony might be important for the nation? Answers will vary.
  61. 61. Section 2-25 Close Explain the Watergate scandal and discuss its effects.
  62. 62. End of Section 2
  63. 63. Section 3-1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading During the 1970s, Presidents Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter attempted to lead the United States through both domestic and foreign crises. <ul><li>inflation </li></ul>Main Idea Key Terms and Names <ul><li>embargo </li></ul><ul><li>stagflation </li></ul><ul><li>Helsinki Accords </li></ul><ul><li>Department of Energy </li></ul>
  64. 64. Section 3-2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading (cont.) Reading Strategy Organizing As you read about the administrations of Presidents Ford and Carter, complete a graphic organizer similar to the one on page 843 of your textbook listing the causes of economic problems in the 1970s. <ul><li>Explain the reasons for economic troubles in the United States during the 1970s. </li></ul>Reading Objectives <ul><li>Discuss Jimmy Carter’s domestic and foreign policies. </li></ul>
  65. 65. Section 3-3 Guide to Reading (cont.) Section Theme Economic Factors A weakening economy and growing energy crisis marred the terms of Ford and Carter.
  66. 66. Section 3-4 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  67. 67. Section 3-5 The Economic Crisis of the 1970s Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 843–845) <ul><li>During the 1970s, the economic prosperity of the 1950s and 1960s began to disappear. </li></ul><ul><li>The economic troubles began under Lyndon Johnson’s leadership. </li></ul><ul><li>He increased federal deficit spending to fund the Vietnam War and the Great Society program without raising taxes. </li></ul><ul><li>Pumping large amounts of money into the economy created inflation, or a rise in the cost of goods. </li></ul>
  68. 68. Section 3-6 The Economic Crisis of the 1970s Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (cont.) <ul><li>In 1973 the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) announced an embargo, or the stopping of shipping, of petroleum to countries that supported Israel. </li></ul><ul><li>The price of a barrel of crude oil increased from $3 in 1973 to $30 in 1980. </li></ul><ul><li>Even before the embargo, President Nixon and Congress imposed price controls on gasoline and heating oil. </li></ul><ul><li>After OPEC raised its prices, the price controls created an oil shortage. </li></ul>(pages 843–845)
  69. 69. Section 3-7 <ul><li>Increased international competition for manufactured goods added to the economic problems. </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. factories closed, and workers lost their jobs. </li></ul><ul><li>The U.S. economy faced “stagflation” –the economic dilemma that combined rising prices with economic stagnation. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The Economic Crisis of the 1970s (cont.) (pages 843–845)
  70. 70. Section 3-8 <ul><li>Nixon focused on controlling inflation by cutting spending and raising taxes. </li></ul><ul><li>Congress and many Americans opposed Nixon’s idea of a tax hike, as well as his other ideas on how to end stagflation. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The Economic Crisis of the 1970s (cont.) (pages 843–845)
  71. 71. Section 3-9 What caused the economic crisis of the 1970s? Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. The Economic Crisis of the 1970s (cont.) (pages 843–845)
  72. 72. Section 3-9a The crisis began to take shape in the mid-1960s when Lyndon Johnson significantly increased federal deficit spending to fund both the Vietnam War and the Great Society program without raising taxes. This pumped large amounts of money into the economy, which caused inflation. The rising cost of raw materials, especially oil, also added to inflation. In 1973 OPEC announced an embargo on petroleum to countries that supported Israel. OPEC also greatly raised the price of crude oil. High prices for gasoline and home heating oil meant Americans had less money to spend on other goods, which forced the economy into a recession. By the early 1970s, the U.S. economy suffered from stagflation–a combination of inflation and recession. The Economic Crisis of the 1970s (cont.) (pages 843–845)
  73. 73. Section 3-10 Ford Takes Over Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>On September 8, 1974, President Gerald Ford granted a full pardon to Richard Nixon. </li></ul><ul><li>Ford’s approval rating plunged from 71 percent to 50 percent. </li></ul>(pages 845–846)
  74. 74. Section 3-10a Ford Takes Over Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>By 1975 the American economy was in its worst recession since the Great Depression. </li></ul><ul><li>Ford attempted to revive the economy, but his Whip Inflation Now (WIN) plan failed. </li></ul><ul><li>He tried to limit federal authority, balance the budget, and keep taxes low. </li></ul><ul><li>He also vetoed more than 50 bills that Congress had passed during the first two years Ford had served there. </li></ul>(pages 845–846)
  75. 75. Section 3-11 <ul><li>Ford continued the foreign policy of Nixon. </li></ul><ul><li>In August 1975, Ford met with leaders of NATO and the Warsaw Pact to sign the Helsinki Accords. </li></ul>Ford Takes Over (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 845–846)
  76. 76. Section 3-12 <ul><li>Under the accords, the parties recognized the borders of Eastern Europe established at the end of World War II. </li></ul><ul><li>The Soviets promised to uphold certain basic human rights but later went back on this promise, which turned many Americans against détente. Southeast Asia also continued to be a concern for Ford when Cambodia seized an American cargo ship, the Mayaguez. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Ford Takes Over (cont.) (pages 845–846)
  77. 77. Section 3-13 <ul><li>In the election of 1976, Democratic candidate Jimmy Carter won with 50.1 percent of the popular vote. </li></ul><ul><li>Carter was seen as a person of high morals and an upstanding personality. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Ford Takes Over (cont.) (pages 845–846)
  78. 78. Section 3-14 Why did Ford pardon Nixon? He wanted to avoid the division that charges against Nixon and a public trial would create. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Ford Takes Over (cont.) (pages 845–846)
  79. 79. Section 3-15 Carter Battles the Economic Crisis Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>President Carter focused most of his attention on the energy crisis. His efforts were unsuccessful. </li></ul><ul><li>Carter proposed a national energy program to conserve oil and to promote the use of coal and renewable energy sources. </li></ul><ul><li>He had Congress create the Department of Energy. </li></ul><ul><li>He asked Americans to reduce energy consumption, which most Americans ignored. </li></ul>(pages 846–847)
  80. 80. Section 3-16 <ul><li>Scholars have suggested that Carter’s difficulties in solving the nation’s economic problems were the result of his lack of leadership and inability to work with Congress. </li></ul><ul><li>A 1979 public opinion poll showed that Carter’s popularity had dropped lower than President Nixon’s rating during Watergate. </li></ul>Carter Battles the Economic Crisis Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (cont.) (pages 846–847)
  81. 81. Section 3-17 How did President Carter propose to improve the economy? Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Carter Battles the Economic Crisis (cont.) (pages 846–847)
  82. 82. Section 3-17a He tried to end the recession and reduce unemployment by increasing government spending and cutting taxes. Inflation increased, however, so he decided to delay the tax cuts and vetoed spending programs he had proposed to Congress. He reduced the money supply and raised interest rates. He tried to rally American support for a war against rising energy consumption. He proposed a national energy program to conserve oil and to promote the use of coal and renewable energy sources. He created the Department of Energy. He asked Americans to reduce energy consumption. Carter Battles the Economic Crisis (cont.) (pages 846–847)
  83. 83. Section 3-18 Carter’s Foreign Policy Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>President Carter’s foreign policy focused on human rights. </li></ul><ul><li>Carter won Senate ratification of two Panama Canal treaties, which transferred control of the canal to Panama on December 31, 1999. </li></ul>(pages 847–849)
  84. 84. Section 3-19 <ul><li>President Carter singled out the Soviet Union as a violator of human rights because of its practice of imprisoning people who protested against the government. </li></ul><ul><li>Tensions deepened as the Soviet Union invaded the Central Asian nation of Afghanistan in December 1979. </li></ul><ul><li>Carter responded with an embargo on grain to the Soviet Union and a boycott of the Summer Olympic Games in Moscow. </li></ul>Carter’s Foreign Policy (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 847–849)
  85. 85. Section 3-20 <ul><li>In 1978 Carter helped get a historic peace treaty, known as the Camp David Accords, signed between Israel and Egypt. </li></ul><ul><li>Most Arab nations in the region opposed the treaty, but it marked the first step toward peace in the Middle East. </li></ul>Carter’s Foreign Policy (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 847–849)
  86. 86. Section 3-21 <ul><li>In 1979 Iran’s monarch, the Shah, was forced to flee, and an Islamic republic was declared. </li></ul><ul><li>The Shah was supported by the United States. </li></ul><ul><li>The religious leader Ayatollah Khomeini distrusted the United States. </li></ul><ul><li>Revolutionaries entered the American embassy in Tehran and held 52 Americans hostage. </li></ul>Carter’s Foreign Policy (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 847–849)
  87. 87. Section 3-22 <ul><li>The hostages would not be released until Carter’s last day in office, some 444 days in captivity. </li></ul>Carter’s Foreign Policy (cont.) (pages 847–849)
  88. 88. Section 3-23 What were President Carter’s foreign policy successes? Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Carter’s Foreign Policy (cont.) (pages 847–849)
  89. 89. Section 3-23 President Carter’s foreign policy focused on human rights. Carter won Senate ratification of two Panama Canal treaties, which transferred control of the canal to Panama on December 31, 1999. He singled out the Soviet Union as a violator of human rights because of its practice of imprisoning people who protested against the government. Carter placed an embargo on grain to the Soviet Union and a boycott of the Summer Olympic Games in Moscow. In 1978 Carter helped get a historic peace treaty signed between Israel and Egypt, known as the Camp David Accords. Carter’s Foreign Policy (cont.) (pages 847–849)
  90. 90. Section 3-24 Checking for Understanding __ 1. a government ban on trade with other countries __ 2. the loss of value of money __ 3. persistent inflation combined with stagnant consumer demand and relatively high unemployment A. inflation B. embargo C. stagflation Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. A C B
  91. 91. Section 3-25 Checking for Understanding (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Identify the achievement and failure President Carter experienced in the Middle East during his administration. The achievement was the Camp David Accords, and the failure was the hostage crisis in Iran.
  92. 92. Section 3-26 Reviewing Themes Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Economic Factors How did President Carter attempt to deal with the nation’s energy crisis? Carter proposed a national energy program to conserve oil and promote the use of renewable energy sources, created the Department of Energy, and deregulated the oil industry.
  93. 93. Section 3-27 Critical Thinking Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Evaluating Do you think President Ford should have pardoned Richard Nixon? Why or why not? Answers will vary.
  94. 94. Section 3-28 Analyzing Visuals Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Analyzing Photographs Study the photograph on page 848 of your textbook. What effect do you think images such as this one had on Americans who were living or traveling in other countries? They would fear attacks on themselves.
  95. 95. Section 3-29 Close Discuss Jimmy Carter’s domestic and foreign policies.
  96. 96. End of Section 3
  97. 97. Section 4-1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading In the midst of widespread cynicism about their leaders and concerns about the economy, Americans sought fulfillment and escape during the 1970s. <ul><li>New Age movement </li></ul>Main Idea Key Terms and Names <ul><li>guru </li></ul><ul><li>transcendental meditation </li></ul><ul><li>All in the Family </li></ul><ul><li>disco </li></ul>
  98. 98. Section 4-2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading (cont.) Reading Strategy Categorizing As you read about life in the United States in the 1970s, complete a graphic organizer similar to the one on page 850 of your textbook by listing the changes that occurred in family life during that time. <ul><li>Explain the emergence of new spiritual movements and religions. </li></ul>Reading Objectives <ul><li>Discuss social changes of the 1970s. </li></ul>
  99. 99. Section 4-3 Guide to Reading (cont.) Section Theme Culture and Traditions Even after the turbulent 1960s, American culture continued changing to reflect new trends and ideas.
  100. 100. Section 4-4 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  101. 101. Section 4-5 The Search for Fulfillment Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Writer Tom Wolfe labeled the 1970s the “me decade,” referring to the self-absorbed attitude of the American people. </li></ul><ul><li>Some young Americans looked for fulfillment through an array of secular movements and activities that made up the New Age movement. </li></ul><ul><li>Believers in the movement felt that people were responsible for and capable of everything. </li></ul>(pages 850–852)
  102. 102. Section 4-6 <ul><li>They believed spiritual enlightenment could be found in common practices. </li></ul><ul><li>Some Americans looked to new religions or cults. </li></ul><ul><li>Many new religions originated in Asia and centered on the teachings of a guru, or a mystical leader. </li></ul>The Search for Fulfillment (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 850–852)
  103. 103. Section 4-7 <ul><li>One of the best known gurus, Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, led a religious movement known as transcendental meditation, in which it was thought that with daily meditation and silent repetitive mantras, peak intelligence, harmony, and health could be reached. </li></ul><ul><li>By 1970, 60 percent of all women between the ages of 16 and 24 had joined the workforce. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The Search for Fulfillment (cont.) (pages 850–852)
  104. 104. Section 4-8 <ul><li>American family life changed with the increase in women working outside of the home. </li></ul><ul><li>This resulted in smaller families, parents and children spending less time together, and a rise in divorce rates. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The Search for Fulfillment (cont.) (pages 850–852)
  105. 105. Section 4-9 Why did some young Americans look to the New Age movement for fulfillment? Some young men and women were disenchanted with the conventional religions of their parents. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. The Search for Fulfillment (cont.) (pages 850–852)
  106. 106. Section 4-10 Cultural Trends in the 1970s Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Television changed during this time, reflecting many of the changes taking place in society. </li></ul><ul><li>The Mary Tyler Moore Show placed an unmarried woman with a meaningful career at the center of the show. </li></ul><ul><li>Taboo subjects like racism were addressed in the 1971 show All in the Family. </li></ul>(pages 852–854)
  107. 107. Section 4-11 <ul><li>By carefully mixing humor and sensitive issues while not preaching to the audience, the show made viewers examine their own feelings about social issues. </li></ul><ul><li>The music of the 1970s had a softer, more reflective, and less political sound. </li></ul><ul><li>The rise of disco music became the craze in African American and Latin nightclubs. </li></ul>Cultural Trends in the 1970s (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 852–854)
  108. 108. Section 4-12 <ul><li>The fast pace and loud persistent beat attracted fans. </li></ul><ul><li>Several other fads became popular during this “me” decade. Skateboards, T-shirts with personalized messages, mood rings, and citizens band (CB) radios all became popular during the 1970s. </li></ul><ul><li>Fitness was a trend in the 1970s. </li></ul><ul><li>Aerobic fitness was introduced, and men and women began running and joining gyms as a social activity. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Cultural Trends in the 1970s (cont.) (pages 852–854)
  109. 109. Section 4-13 Why was disco well suited for the “me” generation? The music allowed people dancing to it to assume greater prominence than the music. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Cultural Trends in the 1970s (cont.) (pages 852–854)
  110. 110. Section 4-14 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Checking for Understanding __ 1. popular dance music characterized by hypnotic rhythm, repetitive lyrics, and electronically produced sounds __ 2. a person with knowledge or expertise, especially a religious teacher and spiritual guide in Hinduism __ 3. a technique of meditation in which a mantra is chanted as a way of achieving peak intelligence, harmony, and health A. guru B. transcendental meditation C. disco Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. A B C
  111. 111. Section 4-15 Checking for Understanding (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Summarize the basic beliefs of followers of transcendental meditation. They believed in daily meditation and mantras as a way of achieving peak intelligence, harmony, and health.
  112. 112. Section 4-16 Reviewing Themes Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Culture and Traditions What new cultural trends affected American society in the 1970s? Television dealt with controversial issues, transcendental meditation, disco and a new fashion developed, and fitness became a craze in the 1970s.
  113. 113. Section 4-17 Analyzing Visuals Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Analyzing Photographs Study the photographs in the “What Life Was Like” feature on pages 852–853 of your textbook. How have popular music and fashion changed since the 1970s? Dance music has become more varied, and fashions have become less tailored and more casual.
  114. 114. Section 4-18 Close Discuss whether some traditional values became weaker during the 1970s.
  115. 115. End of Section 4
  116. 116. Chapter Summary 1
  117. 117. End of Chapter Summary
  118. 118. Chapter Assessment 1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Reviewing Key Terms Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. __ 1. persistent inflation combined with stagnant consumer demand and relatively high unemployment __ 2. a policy which attempts to relax or ease tensions between nations __ 3. a government ban on trade with other countries __ 4. to take possession of __ 5. principle stating that communications of the executive branch should remain confidential to protect national security __ 6. a meeting of heads of governments A. impound B. détente C. summit D. executive privilege E. impeach F. embargo G. stagflation H. guru I. transcendental meditation J. disco B F G A D C
  119. 119. Chapter Assessment 2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Reviewing Key Terms (cont.) Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. __ 7. a person with knowledge or expertise, especially a religious teacher and spiritual guide in Hinduism __ 8. to formally charge a public official with misconduct in office __ 9. popular dance music characterized by hypnotic rhythm, repetitive lyrics, and electronically produced sounds __ 10. a technique of meditation in which a mantra is chanted as a way of achieving peak intelligence, harmony, and health E J H I A. impound B. détente C. summit D. executive privilege E. impeach F. embargo G. stagflation H. guru I. transcendental meditation J. disco
  120. 120. Chapter Assessment 3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts What were the main aspects of President Nixon’s domestic and foreign policies? Nixon’s domestic policy focused on the New Federalism, and his foreign policy focused on détente.
  121. 121. Chapter Assessment 4 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts (cont.) What was the impact of the Watergate scandal on the American people? Most Americans lost trust in public officials.
  122. 122. Chapter Assessment 5 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts (cont.) Why did President Nixon freeze wages and prices in the early 1970s? President Nixon believed wage and price freezes would stop stagflation, a combination of rising prices and economic stagnation.
  123. 123. Chapter Assessment 6 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts (cont.) What factors caused economic problems in the United States in the 1970s? Rising oil prices, increased international competition, low job training for new jobs, and a decline in manufacturing caused economic problems in the 1970s.
  124. 124. Chapter Assessment 7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts (cont.) What changes in family life occurred in the United States in the 1970s? Changes in family life included smaller families, more divorces, parents and children spending less time together, and women becoming more active in the workplace and outside the home.
  125. 125. Chapter Assessment 8 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking Analyzing Themes: Government and Democracy How did the Watergate scandal affect the relationship among the three branches of government? The Supreme Court forced the president to yield presidential privilege, thus decreasing the power of the executive branch. Congress passed laws establishing a greater balance of power, requiring financial disclosure from all branches of government, and establishing independent counsel to investigate wrongdoings of government officials.
  126. 126. Chapter Assessment 9 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking (cont.) Evaluating What impact did cultural phenomena such as disco music, the use of CB radios, and exercise trends have on the U.S. economy? Disco music led to the opening of dance clubs; millions of people bought CB radios; and exercise clubs opened throughout the country. Each helped the economy expand.
  127. 127. Chapter Assessment 10 Economics and History The graph on page 857 of your textbook shows inflation rates in the United States from 1960 to 1992. Study the graph and answer the questions on the following slides.
  128. 128. Chapter Assessment 11 Interpreting Graphs How did the nation’s inflation rate change between 1965 and 1980? The inflation rate increased from under 2 percent in 1965 to over 12 percent in 1980. Economics and History (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  129. 129. Chapter Assessment 12 Economics and History (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Determining Cause and Effect What factor was most important in causing this change? The rise in the price of crude oil was the biggest factor for the ballooning rate of inflation.
  130. 130. Chapter Assessment 13 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Directions: Choose the phrase that best completes the following sentence. As a political conservative, President Nixon wanted to A increase federal spending on welfare programs. B take more aggressive federal action to speed desegregation. C return power to state governments. D appoint activist-minded justices to the Supreme Court. Test-Taking Tip Think of the meaning of political conservative: someone who believes that the federal government’s role in society should be limited. Choose the answer that best reflects this meaning.
  131. 131. Chapter Assessment 14 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. What did the impeachment process test? The impeachment process checked the system of checks and balances.
  132. 132. End of Chapter Assessment
  133. 133. F/F/F 1-Fact “ Ping-Pong” Diplomacy In April 1971, nearly a year before President Nixon made his historic trip there, Communist China welcomed a different kind of U.S. delegation–the American ping-pong team. When the team received their surprise invitation, Time magazine called it “the ping heard round the world.” The nine players, four officials, and two spouses who arrived on the Chinese mainland were the first Americans to enter China since the Communist takeover in 1949. In another example of the continuing efforts to normalize relations with China, Ling-Ling and Hsing-Hsing arrived at the National Zoo in 1972. A gift from China, the rare giant pandas attracted visitors and volunteers. In addition, the pair provided a wealth of scientific knowledge about the endangered panda. Following the deaths of Ling-Ling and Hsing-Hsing in 1992 and 1999, the National Zoo made arrangements to borrow two new pandas from China. Tian-Tian and Mei Xiang arrived in December 2000.
  134. 134. F/F/F 4-Fact Put on a Happy Face Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, the nation experienced a “button craze” as people expressed themselves by pinning buttons with slogans to their clothing. The most popular button actually said nothing at all. In 1971 Americans began buying a yellow button with a simple smile on it. By the fall of 1971, marketers estimated that more than 20 million smile buttons had been sold, making it the most popular fad item since the hula hoop. In the late 1990s the United States Postal Service issued a series of stamps depicting the twentieth century. The “Celebrate the Century” series featured 15 stamps for each decade. The ubiquitous smiley face was one of the images selected for the 1970s series. Two other stamps, one depicting disco and the other featuring 1970s fashion, also commemorated the 1970s.
  135. 135. FYI 1-1 Henry Kissinger and his family fled Nazi Germany in 1938. He studied at Harvard and later became a professor there. In 1973 he shared the Nobel Peace Prize with North Vietnamese leader Le Duc Tho .
  136. 136. FYI 2-1 August 8, 1974, is the date Richard Nixon announced his resignation. On the same day in 1815, Napoleon Bonaparte sailed for Saint Helena to spend the rest of his life in exile.
  137. 137. FYI Contents 3 OPEC Jimmy Carter Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slide.
  138. 138. FYI 3-1a OPEC is responsible for approximately 40 percent of the world’s oil production and controls 75 percent of the world’s proven oil reserves.
  139. 139. FYI 3-2b After his inauguration, Jimmy Carter and his family chose to walk up Pennsylvania Avenue from the Capitol to the White House instead of riding in the traditional limousine. The gesture symbolized Carter’s desire to lead a simple life even while in the White House.
  140. 140. FYI 4-1 In January 1977, ABC broadcast the Roots miniseries. Based on the 1976 novel by Alex Haley, the program traced the history of an African family’s struggle with slavery through several generations. The miniseries became a surprise hit. Media coverage of the Roots phenomenon indicated that restaurants and shops noticed a decline in business during the broadcast.
  141. 141. Moment in History 3 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  142. 142. You Don’t Say 4-1 Fads Popular fashion fads of the 1970s included platform shoes for men, leisure suits, tank tops, and Farrah Fawcett hairdos.
  143. 143. CT Skill Builder 1 Analyzing Secondary Sources Your textbook, like many other history books, is a secondary source. Secondary sources draw from primary sources to explain a topic. The value of a secondary source depends on how its author uses primary sources. Learning to analyze secondary sources will help you figure out whether those sources are presenting a complete and accurate picture of a topic or event. Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  144. 144. CT Skill Builder 2 Learning the Skill To determine whether an author uses primary sources effectively, ask these questions: <ul><li>Are there references to primary sources in the text, footnotes, or acknowledgments? </li></ul><ul><li>Who are the authors of the primary sources? What insights or biases might these people have? </li></ul><ul><li>Is the information from the primary sources interwoven effectively to support or describe an event? </li></ul><ul><li>Are different kinds of primary sources considered? Do they represent varied testimony? </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Analyzing Secondary Sources
  145. 145. CT Skill Builder 3 Learning the Skill (cont.) <ul><li>Is the interpretation of the primary sources sound and logical? </li></ul>Analyzing Secondary Sources
  146. 146. CT Skill Builder 4 Practicing the Skill In the excerpt on the next slide from The Cold War, 1945–1987 , author Ralph B. Levering discusses President Carter’s China policy. Carter sent his national security adviser, Zbigniew Brzezinski, to China to encourage better relations and thus put pressure on the Soviets. As you read, identify the primary sources Levering uses to make his argument. Then answer the questions on the following slides. Analyzing Secondary Sources
  147. 147. CT Skill Builder 5 During his trip to Peking, Brzezinski did everything he could to please the Chinese leaders…He stressed repeatedly the evil nature of the Soviet Union…Upon his return, Brzezinski told a New York Times reporter that trip was intended to “underline the long-term strategic nature of the United States’ relationship to China.” … Soviet leaders were deeply concerned. An editorial in Pravda on May 30, 1978, stated that Brzezinski “stands before the world as an enemy of détente.” Pravda also blamed China, stating on June 17 that “Soviet-American confrontation…is the cherished dream of Peking.” On the whole, U.S. officials were not displeased by the Kremlin’s anger and concern; perhaps it would make Soviet leaders more anxious to conclude the SALT negotiations and more inclined to show restraint in the Third World. Analyzing Secondary Sources Practicing the Skill (cont.)
  148. 148. CT Skill Builder 6 1. What kind of primary source does Levering use twice in this passage? 2. Do you think this kind of primary source has any possible weaknesses? Levering uses an editorial in a newspaper twice. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Analyzing Secondary Sources The reporter could be using the quote out of context. The Pravda editorials, as all editorials, are opinions. Since the Soviet state ran Pravda, articles and editorials uniformly reflected government policy. Practicing the Skill (cont.)
  149. 149. CT Skill Builder 7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. 3. Would the use of government documents strengthen the author’s argument? Why or why not? Answers will vary. Analyzing Secondary Sources Practicing the Skill (cont.)
  150. 150. M/C 1-1
  151. 151. Why It Matters Transparency
  152. 152. Daily Focus Skills Transparency 1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. No, Nixon would still have won the majority of electoral votes.
  153. 153. Daily Focus Skills Transparency 2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  154. 154. Daily Focus Skills Transparency 3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  155. 155. Daily Focus Skills Transparency 4 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  156. 156. GO 1
  157. 157. GO 2
  158. 158. GO 3
  159. 159. GO 4
  160. 160. HELP To navigate within this Presentation Plus! product: Click the Forward button to go to the next slide. Click the Previous button to return to the previous slide. Click the Section Back button to return to the beginning of the section you are in. If you are viewing a feature, this button returns you to the main presentation. Click the Home button to return to the Chapter Menu. Click the Help button to access this screen. Click the Speaker button to listen to available audio. Click the Speaker Off button to stop any playing audio. Click the Exit button or press the Escape key [Esc] to end the chapter slide show. Click the Maps and Chart button in the top right corner of many slides to link to relevant In-Motion and static maps and charts. Presentation Plus! features such as the Reference Atlas , History Online , and others are located in the left margin of most screens. Click on any of these buttons to access a specific feature.
  161. 161. End of Custom Shows End of Custom Shows WARNING! Do Not Remove This slide is intentionally blank and is set to auto-advance to end custom shows and return to the main presentation.
  162. 162. End of Slide Show

×