Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Formative assessment

1,000 views

Published on

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Formative assessment

  1. 1. Formative Assessment<br />By: Michelle Osborn<br />
  2. 2. What is Formative Assessment?<br />Continual, explicit feedback to students.<br />Assists students in answering three questions:<br />Where am I going?<br />Where am I now?<br />How can I close the gap between the two?<br />To ensure students can bridge the gap between the two feedback must be descriptive and specific.<br />
  3. 3. Five Attributes of Effective Formative Assessment<br />Learning Progressions<br />Show course students should follow to achieve goals<br />Short-term goals<br />Sub-goals<br />Learning Goals and Criteria for Success<br />Clearly identified and communicated to students<br />Explained in user friendly language<br />
  4. 4. Five Attributes Continued…<br />Descriptive Feedback<br />Evidence based feedback<br />Learner specific<br />Self and Peer-Assessment<br />Enables students to take responsibility for their learning<br />Collaboration<br />Partners in learning<br />
  5. 5. Strategies for Formative Assessment<br />The Clinical Interview – Part 1<br />Asses students<br />Quick computational problems<br />http://www.learnnc.org/lp/editions/pcmath/1253<br />Analysis: Student had developed number sense<br />
  6. 6. Strategies Continued…<br />The Clinical Interview – Part 2<br />Photo Enlargement Problem<br />Analysis: Significant student recognized task and set up proportion<br />
  7. 7. Strategies Continued…<br />The Clinical Interview – Part 3<br /><ul><li>Pool/Walkway Problem : A swimming pool in the shape of a rectangle is surrounded by a 3 foot wide walkway. The pool is 32 feet long. How long would a fence have to be to enclose the walkway and the pool?
  8. 8. Analysis: Mathematical reasoning not strong</li></li></ul><li>Strategies Continued…<br />The Clinical Interview Parts 4 thru 6<br />Additional mathematical problems:<br />Visualizing halves<br />Large and small cubes<br />Fractions and decimals<br />Analysis: Student lacks mathematical reasoning.<br />
  9. 9. Strategies Continued…<br />Assess the Learning Process<br />Ask different types of questions<br />Comprehension Questions<br />Kinesthetic Questions<br />Visual Questions<br />Analytical Questions<br />Grading Rubric<br />
  10. 10. Strategies Continued…<br />Listening While You Work<br />Allow time for students to react to their experiences<br />Have students describe their prior knowledge<br />Informal brainstorming<br />Listen to students respond to open-ended assessments<br />
  11. 11. Strategies Continued…<br />Make Connections Between Concepts<br />Connect the puzzle pieces<br />Make time in class for students to respond<br />Ask your students what is working and what is not<br />
  12. 12. References<br />Buher, Gretchen & Walbert, David. Assessing The Learning Process. LEARN North Carolina, Available on the web at www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/645. (accessed March 15, 2010)<br />Coffey, Heather. Formative Assessment. LEARN North Carolina, Available on the web at www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/5212. (accessed March 15, 2010)<br />Smith Johnson, Kristi. Listening While You Work: Using informal assessments to inform your instruction. LEARN North Carolina, Available on the web at www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/260. (accessed March 15, 2010)<br />Smith Johnson, Kristi. Making Connections between Concepts. LEARN North Carolina, Available on the web at www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/261. (accessed March 15, 2010)<br />Walbert, David. The Clinical Interview. LEARN North Carolina, Available on the web at www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/786. (accessed March 15, 2010)<br />

×