Trust

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A lesson on "trust" for Early Childhood Educators

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Trust

  1. 1. ACDS Semester 2 Week 4 TRUST
  2. 2. Courtney’s Birthday Party by Loretta Long <ul><li>GROUP WORK </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss how this book can </li></ul><ul><li>be used with young children. </li></ul><ul><li>Tonight we will be discussing trust. What do you think of when you hear the word trust? </li></ul>
  3. 3. Trust… as it relates to Early Childhood <ul><li>Trust is the belief that the world is a safe place where needs will be met in a predictable way. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Trust <ul><li>is established in infancy when babies experience consistent responsive care and evolves throughout a lifelong process as the maturing person successfully experiences the world. Strong attachments to adults who respond to babies and their needs in warm, loving ways enable a baby to learn to trust the world. With trusting relationships, babies become interested in the social and physical environment and begin to explore the world, form relationships, and establish the pathways and connections critical for brain development. The outcome is robust physical, cognitive, and social/emotional development. </li></ul>
  5. 5. What do you think of when you hear the word communication? <ul><li>Babies initially communicate needs through crying. As they mature and gain more control over bodies, they add gestures and verbal sounds to their repertoire. A skilled caregiver learns to interpret babies cries, gestures, and sounds and responds appropriately. The relationship that forms from this interaction assures that the baby’s needs are met and that they can begin to conquer the world. A caregiver that understands and responds appropriately to a baby is necessary to survival. </li></ul>
  6. 6. What does Ages and Stages say about Basic Trust ? <ul><li>Page 3 </li></ul><ul><li>“ Basic trust develops as the child learns that her needs will be met. She learns this by a rhythm of distress and relief. The child feels the distress of hunger and cries. The mother or caregiver hears the cry, comes and picks up the baby and feeds her. The distress is relieved. This pattern is repeated and consistent. When a child learns she can trust mother/caregiver to relieve her distress, the trust grows into a feeling of security, and later confidence to try new things.” </li></ul>
  7. 7. What does Ages and Stages say about Basic Trust ? continued <ul><li>“ The concept of basic trust is one good reason, among many others, the babies should be on a demand schedule rather than a schedule contrived for the convenience of adults. The child should sleep, be fed, diapered, cuddled and played with according to the baby’s signals and know the baby well enough to make accurate guesses about what the child needs so she can respond appropriately.” </li></ul>
  8. 8. What I believe… Write your beliefs about holding babies & how you believe you should respond to crying <ul><li>How are our responses on the chart communicating to the babies? </li></ul><ul><li>What we are teaching babies by each of the responses? </li></ul><ul><li>How do you feel each response affects the babies’ social/emotional development ? </li></ul><ul><li>Report back to group… </li></ul>Crying is a babies’ way of communicating to the caregiver.
  9. 9. Group 1: C. A., R. C., and M. C. Group 2: J. A., T. K., and D. M. Group 3: D. B., M. C., and T. M. Group 4: R. M., M. O., and K. S. <ul><li>Each group is to read their given section. When you have each finished reading, summarize the section as group. After all groups have finished you will be reporting back on your section to the whole group. </li></ul><ul><li>Group 1: Responses to Crying </li></ul><ul><li>Group 2: Teaching Behaviors </li></ul><ul><li>Group 3: Carrying and Holding Practices </li></ul><ul><li>Group 4: Extended Families </li></ul>
  10. 10. How do you respond? <ul><li>Scenario: </li></ul><ul><li>A caregiver is changing a baby’s diaper while another baby begins to cry hard. Discuss various ways to connect to the crying baby while finishing up the task. Identify situations when it would be best to stop the diaper change and go to the crying baby and other times it would be acceptable to finish diaper change before going to the crier. </li></ul><ul><li>Each group will report their responses and discuss differences. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Erikson’s Stage Theory <ul><li>According to Erik Erikson’s Eight Ages of Man, individuals develop in eight epigenetic stages (in other words, Erikson proposed that healthy personality growth is characterized by a resolution of inner conflicts). </li></ul><ul><li>Each stage is marked by a major conflict. Resolving the conflict becomes the major task of each stage. Resolution of each stage, however, is different for every individual. </li></ul><ul><li>Erikson believes that it is important to find a favorable balance between the two conflicting factors in each stage. If a stage is managed well, we carry away a certain virtue or psychosocial strength which will help us through the rest of the stages in our lives. </li></ul><ul><li>On the other hand, if we do not do so well, we may develop: </li></ul><ul><li>maladaptations (when one stage consists of too much of the positive and too little of the negative) Example – a person who trusts too much </li></ul><ul><li>malignancies (when one stage consists of too little of the positive and too much of the negative aspect) Example – a person who can not trust others as well as endanger all their future development. </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Each stage of emotional development involves a struggle between two opposing emotional states –one positive, the other negative. These polar states push and pull at the individual, creating tension and posing unique interpersonal problems. The individual’s primary psychological work at a particular stage is to resolve this emotional conflict in a positive direction. The role of teachers and parents in this process is to help children pursue the positive emotional states that are critical to each stage of development. </li></ul><ul><li>The first four of Erikson’s stages involve emotional conflicts that confront children. </li></ul>Ages of Emotional Development
  13. 13. ERIKSON’S EIGHT AGES OF EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT Stage Approximate Age Description Trust vs. Mistrust Birth to 18 months Children must come to trust that basic needs will be met by caregivers and that the world is a predictable and safe place. Otherwise, they will develop feelings of mistrust in others and the world. Autonomy vs. Shame/Doubt 18 months to 3.5 years Children must acquire a sense of independence from parents and a belief that they can do things on their own. If children are overly restricted when asserting their independence, they will develop feelings of shame and doubts about their individuality. Initiative vs. Guilt 3.5 to 6 years Children must feel free to act, to create, to express themselves creatively, and to take risks. Children who are inhibited in these pursuits can become overwhelmed with guilt. Industry vs. Inferiority 6 to 12 years Children must come to feel competent in skills valued by society. They need to feel successful in relation to peers and in the eyes of significant adults. If they experience failure too often, they will come to feel inferior.
  14. 14. ERIKSON’S EIGHT AGES OF EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT Stage Approximate Age Description Identity vs. Role Confusion Adolescence Adolescents must develop a clear sense of self. They must acquire their own unique roles, values, and place in society. If they are unable to piece together these elements into a coherent view of self, role confusion results. Intimacy vs. Isolation Young adulthood Young adults must be willing to risk offering themselves to others. An inability to give to another can lead to feelings of isolation. Generativity vs. Stagnation Mature adult Adults must gain a sense that they have contributed to the world in some lasting fashion. Through child rearing, civic deeds, or paid work they must come to feel they have in some way given to others. Those who do not achieve this sense may suffer stagnation – a sense that there is no direction or purpose to one’s life. Integrity vs. Despair Older adult Older adults must come to feel great satisfaction with the events and accomplishments of their lives. They must look back on their experiences with pride and acceptance. Those who cannot feel this satisfaction as life draws to an end suffer great despair.
  15. 15. Stage 1: Trust vs. Mistrust <ul><li>Approximate Age: Birth to 18 months </li></ul><ul><li>Description: Children must come to trust that basic needs will be met by caregivers and that the world is a predictable and safe place. Otherwise, they will develop feelings of mistrust in others and the world. </li></ul><ul><li>The earliest conflict –between trust and mistrust – occurs in infancy. Emotionally healthy babies come to trust that they have nurturing responsive caregivers who meet their basic needs. They come to view the world as safe and predictable. They enter into trusting relationships. Children who are abused or neglected, whose caregivers do not respond to their needs, or who for other reasons come to doubt the trustworthiness of the world will not resolve this emotional conflict in a positive way. They may be impaired from entering into relationships with others and may be unable to advance to later stages of emotional development. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Group 1: K. S., C. A., T. M., and M. O. Group 2: J. A., D. M., T. K., and D. B. Group 3: R. C., R. M., M. C., M. C. <ul><li>Each group is to read their given section. When you have each </li></ul><ul><li>finished reading, summarize the section as group. After all groups </li></ul><ul><li>have finished you will be reporting back on your section to the </li></ul><ul><li>whole group. </li></ul><ul><li>Group 1: Guiding Young Children </li></ul><ul><li>Group 2: Ages & Stages: Basic Trust & </li></ul><ul><li>Relationships with others </li></ul><ul><li>Group 3: Early Childhood Development </li></ul>
  17. 17. Curriculum <ul><li>When babies are rested, fed, and </li></ul><ul><li>comfortable, they are ready for </li></ul><ul><li>activity. Hungry tired babies are </li></ul><ul><li>not. Accepting babies’ rhythms is </li></ul><ul><li>an important part of curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>planning. </li></ul><ul><li>Group Work – Develop a schedule for an infant room. </li></ul><ul><li>Some caregivers try to have all the babies doing the same thing at the same time. Others may plan schedules that allow for babies to eat and sleep at different times. How can you accommodate babies’ different rhythms for sleeping, eating, and activity? </li></ul><ul><li>Group Work – Design a room layout that allows some to sleep while others eat and play while a caregiver properly supervises the room. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Homework <ul><li>Lab Assignment </li></ul><ul><li>Reader’s Card </li></ul><ul><li>Journal </li></ul>

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