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Terror and
repression: police,
Gestapo and the SS
Using the powers of the
February Decrees and
Enabling Act, the Nazis set
about preventing any
possible opposition.
This in...
After taking power, the Nazis
reorganised Germany’s police
force.
Prior to Nazi rule, each German
state had their own poli...
Himmler oversaw four police
organisations:
• The SS – Nazi police force
and security group
• Orpo – Ordinary police,
deali...
The SS was a hugely influential
part of not only the Nazi Party
but Germany as a whole.
The Schutzstaffel wore black
shirt...
The SS became an auxiliary
police force. It had the power
of arrest of any possible
opponents.
By 1939 the SS had almost
2...
The other major police body in
Nazi Germany was the
Gestapo.
The Gestapo and SS were both
overseen by Himmler and had
some...
The Gestapo were Germany’s
secret police force.
Their key role was to identify
any potential threat to Hitler
and Germany,...
The Gestapo gave the
impression of being all-seeing
and all-knowing. This meant
that potential Nazi opponents
were too sca...
The Gestapo used a variety of
methods to achieve their goals.
They were often given help from
the public, who would offer
...
Most people who were arrested
by the Gestapo had been
denunciated (given up by
people that they knew).
Often the people wh...
The Nazis’ control of the
police helped them control
the German population.
By July 1933, 26,000 people
were political pri...
Historians’ views
• David Evans and Jane Jenkins: Although there were limits to
the power of the SS, its influence was var...
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Consolidation of Nazi Power - terror and repression - police, gestapo, ss

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Facts about the Nazis' use of fear to control Germany

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Consolidation of Nazi Power - terror and repression - police, gestapo, ss

  1. 1. Terror and repression: police, Gestapo and the SS
  2. 2. Using the powers of the February Decrees and Enabling Act, the Nazis set about preventing any possible opposition. This included the use of fear and violence, either through the police, or Nazi organisations such as the SA and SS.
  3. 3. After taking power, the Nazis reorganised Germany’s police force. Prior to Nazi rule, each German state had their own police force. However by 1936 these were reorganised into one national force, under the control of Chief of Police, Heinrich Himmler.
  4. 4. Himmler oversaw four police organisations: • The SS – Nazi police force and security group • Orpo – Ordinary police, dealing with issues such as traffic management • Sipo – Security police forces • SD – Security Service
  5. 5. The SS was a hugely influential part of not only the Nazi Party but Germany as a whole. The Schutzstaffel wore black shirts and were originally Hitler’s bodyguards. Once the Nazis took power, the SS were given a range of powers and acted as a key intimidator of opponents.
  6. 6. The SS became an auxiliary police force. It had the power of arrest of any possible opponents. By 1939 the SS had almost 250,000 members. SS members were part of most German organisations and controlled the death camps during World War Two.
  7. 7. The other major police body in Nazi Germany was the Gestapo. The Gestapo and SS were both overseen by Himmler and had some similar aims (such as stopping Germany’s enemies) but were separate bodies. The Gestapo was originally the Prussian Secret Police.
  8. 8. The Gestapo were Germany’s secret police force. Their key role was to identify any potential threat to Hitler and Germany, and remove them. Based on the Gestapo’s actions, thousands of people were sent to prison or concentration camps.
  9. 9. The Gestapo gave the impression of being all-seeing and all-knowing. This meant that potential Nazi opponents were too scared to even raise their objections. The Gestapo never had more than 30,000 members in a country of around 65 million people.
  10. 10. The Gestapo used a variety of methods to achieve their goals. They were often given help from the public, who would offer comments and cooperation. The Gestapo also used extreme methods to achieve control, including arbitrary arrest and torture to achieve confessions from their victims.
  11. 11. Most people who were arrested by the Gestapo had been denunciated (given up by people that they knew). Often the people who did this were not making a political statement, but a personal one (perhaps based on jealousy or racial hatred). Eventually the Gestapo threatened those making such claims with prison.
  12. 12. The Nazis’ control of the police helped them control the German population. By July 1933, 26,000 people were political prisoners, and between 1933-45, 800,000 people were jailed for resistance. In this same period, 32,000 were legally killed by the state.
  13. 13. Historians’ views • David Evans and Jane Jenkins: Although there were limits to the power of the SS, its influence was varied and extensive. • Richard J Evans: The Nazis did use coercion to achieve control but also tried to win support through the use of propaganda. • Roderick Stackelberg: Hitler was genuinely popular with the German people due to economic improvements. • Robert Gellately: Most Gestapo denunciations came from personal factors, not political ones.

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