Grant proposal presentation

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This is a presentation for a grant proposal for iPads with ProloQuo2Go software.

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Grant proposal presentation

  1. 1. Proving The Rumor The positive effects of iPod-based speech-generating devices on the communicationskills of children with ASD
  2. 2. Presentation Outline1. Autism spectrum disorders2. Augmentative and alternative communication3. Speech-generating devices4. iPod-based SGDs5. Questions and limitations6. Grant proposal
  3. 3. Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) .Division of Birth Defects, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control andPrevention. (2012). Data & statistics. In Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs). Retrieved April 24, 2012, fromhttp://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/data.html.
  4. 4. ASD (continued) DSM IV diagnostic criteria: 1. Delay in, or total lack of, the development of spoken language (not accompanied by an attempt to compensate through alternative modes of communication such as gesture or mime) 2. In individuals with adequate speech, marked impairment in the ability to initiate or sustain a conversation with others • Up to half of children with autism do not develop speech, or develop limited speech. • Individuals with ASD rely predominantly on motoric gestures and prelinguistic behaviorsAmerican Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed., text rev.).doi:10.1176/appi.books.9780890423349.National Research Council. Educating children with autism. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 2001.Van der Meer L, & Rispoli M. (2010). Communication interventions involving speech-generating devices for children withautism: A review of the literature. Developmental Neurorehabilitation, 13, 294-306.
  5. 5. Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) • Aided and unaided AAC systems • Suitability of aided AAC for children with ASD o Permanent visual reference o High iconicity o Variety of visual representations • Aided AAC systems commonly used with children with ASD: o Picture-exchange (PE) systems o Picture exchange communication system (PECS) o Speech-generating devices (SGDs)Ganz J G, Earles-Vollrath T L, Heath A K, Parker R I, Rispoli M J, & Ducan J B. (2012). A Meta-Analysis of Single CaseResearchStudies on Aided Augmentative and Alternative Communication Systems with Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders.Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 42, 60-74.
  6. 6. Speech-Generating Devices• Generally consist of a computer-processing unit and a visual display• Visual display can show anywhere from 2 - 128 items o Dynamic versus fixed• Programmed to produce speech output according to each vocabulary item o Digitized versus synthesized speech output
  7. 7. Speech-Generating Devices Benefits of SGDs: • Provide readily learnable access to basic communication skills • Improves communication patterns, including increases in initiations, contributions and topic length, and decreases in irrelevant and unclear communication • May improve speech production Van der Meer & Rispolis (2010) review of the research literature found that 86% of studies reported positive results, and 78% gave conclusive evidence.Sigafoos, S, Green V, Payne D, Son S, O’Reilly M, Lancioni G. (2009). A comparison of picture exchange and speech-generating devices: Acquisition, preference, and effects on social interaction. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 25, 90-109.Thunberg, G, Ahlsen E, Sandberg A. (2009). Interactions and use of speech0generating devices in thehomes of children with autism spectrum disorders: An analysis of conversation topics. Journal of Special Education Technology, 24:2, 1-16.
  8. 8. Speech-Generating Devices Son et. als (2006) study • Three preschoolers with ASD were taught to use an AAC to request preferred objects in a snack activity at home • Single-subject AB design, comparing the percentage of opportunities with a correct response across two AAC types (PE and SGD) • Showed significant increases in percentage of correct responses for both AAC systems across intervention phases; preference assessment phase showed that two of the children preferred the picture-exchange system and one child preferred the SGD • Highlighted need to consider childs preference when selecting and designing an AAC.Son, S, Sigafoos J, O’Reilly M, Lancioni G. (2006). Comparing two types of augmentative and alternative communicationsystems for children with autism. Pediatric Rehabilitation, 9, 389-395. ormal>Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders,42, 60-74.
  9. 9. Speech-Generating Devices Son et. als (2006) studySon, S, Sigafoos J, O’Reilly M, Lancioni G. (2006). Comparing two types of augmentative and alternative communicationsystems for children with autism. Pediatric Rehabilitation, 9, 389-395. ormal>Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders,42, 60-74.
  10. 10. Speech-Generating DevicesSigafoos et. als (2009) study:• 15-year old boy was taught to use two AAC types (PE and SGD) to request preferred objects• Single-subject AB intervention design, measuring total number of behavior indicators and correct responses over several 10-minute sessions• Results showed a positive shift in the number of correct responses, and an extinction of behavior indicators, in the intervention phase for both AAC types• Extends the conclusions made by Son et. al (2006), adds motivation as important factor for selecting and designing an AAC systemSigafoos, S, Green V, Payne D, Son S, O’Reilly M, Lancioni G. (2009). A comparison of picture exchange andspeech-generating devices: Acquisition, preference, and effects on social interaction. Augmentative and AlternativeCommunication, 25, 90-109.
  11. 11. Speech-Generating DevicesSigafoos et. als (2009) study:Sigafoos, S, Green V, Payne D, Son S, O’Reilly M, Lancioni G. (2009). A comparison of picture exchange andspeech-generating devices: Acquisition, preference, and effects on social interaction. Augmentative and AlternativeCommunication, 25, 90-109.
  12. 12. Speech-Generating Devices Thunberg et. als (2009) study: • 4 children with ASD, ranging in age from 5 to 7 years old • Children and parents taught to use an SGD in the home environment for 1-3 activities each • Used activity-based communication analysis in a single-subject AB intervention design to examine children’s conversational patterns regarding topic type and length, number of segments and contributions, and initiators of topics • During intervention, topics unrelated to the ongoing activity decreased in all activities; also, a small overall increase in topic length as measured by # of segments was observed in 5 out of the 6 activitiesThunberg, G, Ahlsen E, Sandberg A. (2009). Interactions and use of speech-generating devices in the homes of childrenwithautism spectrum disorders: An analysis of conversation topics. Journal of Special Education Technology, 24:2, 1-16.
  13. 13. Speech-Generating Devices Thunberg et. als (2009) study:Thunberg, G, Ahlsen E, Sandberg A. (2009). Interactions and use of speech-generating devices in the homes of childrenwithautism spectrum disorders: An analysis of conversation topics. Journal of Special Education Technology, 24:2, 1-16.
  14. 14. Speech-Generating Devices GGanz J G, Earles-Vollrath T L, Heath A K, Parker R I, Rispoli M J, & Ducan J B. (2012). A Meta-Analysis of Single CaseResearch Studies on Aided Augmentative and Alternative Communication Systems with Individuals with Autism SpectrumDisorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 42, 60-74.
  15. 15. iPod-Based SGDs Device Screen Type Output Type Vocabulary Dimensions Price Dynavox Dynamic High quality Several 8.5 X 10.6 X $7000 Maestro synthesized hundred? 1.8; 2.75 lbs Tech/Talk Fixed Digitized 8X6 - 8X12 13.25 X 8 X 3; $700 - $1000 items 3 lbs Cheap Talk 8 Fixed Digitized 8X6 items 11.8 X 7.8 X $220 - $245 2.3; 1.6 lbs Proloquo2Go Dynamic High quality 8000+ items 4.4 X 2.3 X . $200 + $200 w/iPod Touch synthesized 28; 3.5 oz for the iPod Benefits of iPod & Proloquo2Go: • PriceMirenda, P. (2009). Promising interventions in AAC for individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Perspectives on • PortabilityAugmentative and Alternative Communication, 18, 112-113.
  16. 16. iPod-Based SGDs
  17. 17. iPod-Based SGDs Van der Meer et. als (2011) study: • Taught 2 adolescents (14 and 15 years old) and one adult (23 years old) use of an iPod Touch with Proloquo2Go to request preferred objects • Single-subject AB intervention design, measuring number of correct responses in several 5-minute sessions • Results showed increased number of responses across intervention phases, and maintained across orientation and alternating as well as follow-up phases • Preliminary evidence supporting the use of iPod-based SGDs for teaching basic communication skillsVan der Meer, L, Kagohara D, Achmadi D, Green V, Herrington C, Sigafoos, J. (2011). Teaching functional use of aniPod-based speech-generating device to individuals with developmental disabilities. Journal of Special EducationTechnology, 26:3, 1-11.
  18. 18. Questions and Limitations • Lack of longitudinal research • Limited generalizability of research results • AAC system selection and design is highly individualized o research not to suggest that all children can be taught how to use all SGDs successfully o Various individual and device characteristics contribute to successful mastery of an AAC system o No guarantee that the user would like to use/own the deviceSon, S, Sigafoos J, O’Reilly M, Lancioni G. (2006). Comparing two types of augmentative and alternative communicationsystems for children with autism. Pediatric Rehabilitation, 9, 389-395.Van der Meer, L, Kagohara D, Achmadi D, Green V, Herrington C, Sigafoos, J. (2011). Teaching functional use of aniPod-based speech-generating device to individuals with developmental disabilities. Journal of Special EducationTechnology, 26:3, 1-11.
  19. 19. Grant ProposalGoal 1: Assessments will be performed on a sample of children identified as candidatesfor SGD intervention to determine whether if Proloquo2Go and an iPad-based device arean appropriate treatment choice.Goal 2: Direct service staff will demonstrate understanding and appropriate use of theProloquo2Go app on an iPad to assist children in requesting preferred items.Goal 3: Children will independently navigate the Proloquo2Go app on an iPad tocommunicate wants, needs and ideas.

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