09p1 Castletowns 2

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09p1 Castletowns 2

  1. 1. CASTLE TOWNS By Collin and Bethany
  2. 2. Introduction <ul><li>Castle Towns were made for defense, but they were the grandest example of the blending beauty and practicality in the Japanese arts. The first samurai castles were rough wooden forts set beside rivers and swamps or on hilltops and rocky cliffs. These castles were protected by natural defenses and the forts were sheltered samurai bands fighting to defend a lord’s estate or conquer neighboring lands. The castle towns were used for all normal household uses but have very minimal furniture, like the rooms did not appear to have beds, because they hid the beds in closets. The size of the room varied depending on their intended function. The land on which people lived depended on their social status. The daimyo lived in the castles and surrounding his home was the homes of his supporters. The most important warriors lived near to the keep, and lower-ranking warriors lived outside the castle walls clustered in neighborhoods according to their social status. A daimyo’s castle surrounded the homes of his supporters. The most important warriors lived near to the keep. Lower-ranking warriors lived outside the castle walls, clustered in neighborhoods according to their social status. Outside the borders of the castle town set the fields and the dark, overcrowded huts of peasant farmers. Between the higher and lower samurai were areas set aside for favored merchants and artisans. The size of the samurai’s house depended on his rank, but all shared the same basic design. Castle towns were originally defended by samurai, but by the end of the sixteenth century they were ruled by daimyo. </li></ul>
  3. 3. What is the history of Castle Towns? <ul><li>Castle towns were first built in 16 th Century </li></ul><ul><li>When first built, mainly used for the daimyo and his highest samurai </li></ul><ul><li>Later in 16 th century most castle towns began to transform into city complexes </li></ul>
  4. 4. What is inside the Castle Towns? <ul><li>Inside Castle towns wooden corridors connected sets of rooms subdivided one another by sliding screens, the shoji (translucent paper screens) </li></ul><ul><li>Outer walls of the rooms could be slid back to reveal gardens and ponds, inner screens were decorated with pictures of landscapes and animals. </li></ul><ul><li>Rooms were various sizes depending upon intended function </li></ul><ul><li>Furniture inside rooms was very nominal </li></ul><ul><li>Subtle decoration provided by a tokanoma, an alcove in the corner of a room where a hanging scroll could be displayed </li></ul><ul><li>The bedding, was packed away in concealed cupboards, only brought out for sleeping, beds called tatami </li></ul>
  5. 5. What surrounded the castle <ul><li>Surrounding castle, there are many ways to defend the warriors attacking it. </li></ul><ul><li>Platforms for shooting arrows, barred windows for shooting, trapdoors triggering large stones, if they got passed this, boiling liquids were poured through holes above the castle’s gates </li></ul><ul><li>People surrounding the castle would be homes of his followers </li></ul><ul><li>Closest living to him were the most important samurai, had houses near his keep. </li></ul><ul><li>Lower ranking samurai warriors lived outside the castle walls, grouped in neighborhoods according to their rank </li></ul><ul><li>Between higher and lower samurai were areas set aside for merchants and artisans </li></ul><ul><li>Farther out, fields could be found that were set aside for peasant farmers to live and grow crops  </li></ul><ul><li>In the towns, more people inhabited inns, and took care of horse stables </li></ul>
  6. 6. What is the social structure of Castle Tows <ul><li>Daimyo’s castle surrounded the homes of his supporters </li></ul><ul><li>Most important warriors lived near to the keep </li></ul><ul><li>Lower-ranking warriors lived outside castle walls, clustered in neighborhoods according to their status </li></ul><ul><li>Between the higher and lower samurai were areas set aside for favored merchants and artisans </li></ul><ul><li>Merchants although at the lowest social status, were wealthiest </li></ul><ul><li>Because merchants were rich, they could travel on roads in their own kago </li></ul><ul><li>Outside borders of castle towns were the dark, overcrowded huts of peasant farmers </li></ul><ul><li>The size of the samurai’s house depended on his rank, but all shared the same basic design </li></ul><ul><li>Even lowest ranking samurai was master in his own house </li></ul><ul><li>A samurai spent most of his time away from his house, because they worked long days </li></ul><ul><li>When they gathered to admire the blossoms of the cherry tree, samurai reflected on the rich but often tragically short life of a Japanese warrior </li></ul>
  7. 7. Conclusion <ul><li>As you can see, from simple stockades, to elaborate fortresses, the castle towns grew as did the town built around it. From daimyo houses only, they grew to be able to fit an entire army. But as they grew, the towns of the castle did also. From small people to large trading areas and cropping areas, the towns grew. The people of the castle towns and the castle towns themselves, grew very maturely, and advanced their society throughout the 16 th Century. </li></ul>

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