World War IWilson and Neutrality – 10.2<br />Page 328-333<br />
New Kind of War<br />The new technology of the Modern Age will prove to make World War I more deadly than any previous war...
Contrast with the Franco-Prussian War of 1871<br />
Trench Warfare<br />Strategy where each side prepares to hold its ground by digging in and setting up fortifications<br />
Trench quality ranged from simple holes in the ground, to complex networks with rooms for sleeping and eating.<br />Trench...
No Man’s Land<br />The area between the trenches of opposing forces<br />Filled with barbed wire, craters, dead bodies<br ...
Tactics and Technology<br />Armies used airplanes to gather information, shoot down enemy planes, and fire on trenches<br ...
Military Deadlock<br />By late 1914, the war had become a STALEMATE – a situation where neither side can win a clear victo...
From Wikipedia:<br />The Battle of the Somme became one of the largest battles of the First World War and continued from 1...
American Involvement<br />Americans had immigrated from all parts of Europe, so some supported the Allies, while others su...
“Official” neutrality did not stop American businesses from selling weapons to European Powers – both sides in fact<br />W...
Sussex Pledge<br />Germany sinks another passenger ship – the Sussex – less than a year after the Lusitania.<br />Presiden...
U.S.A. Joins the Conflict<br />Feb. 17th, 1917 Germany resumes unrestricted submarine warfare<br />US cuts off diplomatic ...
Although Mexico has little love for the United States, the decline the offer – why?<br />German financial support would no...
Declaration<br />United States declares war on Germany on April 6th, 1917 – three years after the war had started in Europ...
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11.2 Wilson And Neutrality Narration

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11.2 Wilson And Neutrality Narration

  1. 1. World War IWilson and Neutrality – 10.2<br />Page 328-333<br />
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  3. 3. New Kind of War<br />The new technology of the Modern Age will prove to make World War I more deadly than any previous war. Examples:<br />automobiles<br />Airplane<br />Tank<br />Early radio<br />Machine guns<br />Heavy artillery<br />Poison gas<br />Submarines<br />
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  5. 5. Contrast with the Franco-Prussian War of 1871<br />
  6. 6. Trench Warfare<br />Strategy where each side prepares to hold its ground by digging in and setting up fortifications<br />
  7. 7. Trench quality ranged from simple holes in the ground, to complex networks with rooms for sleeping and eating.<br />Trenches were cold, wet, dirty, filled with rats, and soldiers were forced to stay in them for weeks at a time.<br />
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  9. 9. No Man’s Land<br />The area between the trenches of opposing forces<br />Filled with barbed wire, craters, dead bodies<br />Armies would charge out of their trenches, over No Man’s Land and into the enemy trenches to kill the other side’s troops at close range<br />
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  18. 18. Tactics and Technology<br />Armies used airplanes to gather information, shoot down enemy planes, and fire on trenches<br />U-boats, or German submarines were used to sink Allied shipping boats.<br />British and French forces developed the tank to assist in infantry attacks on trenches<br />
  19. 19. Military Deadlock<br />By late 1914, the war had become a STALEMATE – a situation where neither side can win a clear victory<br />Massive battles would be fought with staggering amounts of death, only to move the battle lines a few miles in either direction.<br />Read page 330, both paragraphs<br />
  20. 20. From Wikipedia:<br />The Battle of the Somme became one of the largest battles of the First World War and continued from 1 July to 18 November 1916. By the time the winter set in and fighting had receded, more than 1.5 million casualties had been suffered by the forces involved. <br />It is now understood to have been one of the bloodiest military operations ever recorded. It is difficult to declare the Battle of the Somme a victory for either side. The British had gained only two miles and lost about 420,000 soldiers in the process, meaning that a centimeter cost about two men. <br />
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  22. 22. American Involvement<br />Americans had immigrated from all parts of Europe, so some supported the Allies, while others supported the Central Powers<br />President Wilson declared that the United States would stay neutral – not get involved<br />
  23. 23. “Official” neutrality did not stop American businesses from selling weapons to European Powers – both sides in fact<br />We sold more to the Allies though, and Germany eventually catches on that we weren’t quite ‘neutral’ – so they began to sink our merchant ships<br />Then they sank the passenger liner Lusitania, killing about 1,200 people including 128 Americans<br />READ – 332 middle of the page “In May 1915”<br />
  24. 24. Sussex Pledge<br />Germany sinks another passenger ship – the Sussex – less than a year after the Lusitania.<br />President Wilson is angry but gets Germany to promise that it will not sink ships “without warning and without saving human lives.”<br />Wilson is seen as a peacemaker, and wins re-election with that reputation.<br />(US Presidents serve for 4 years, no more than twice in their lives)<br />
  25. 25. U.S.A. Joins the Conflict<br />Feb. 17th, 1917 Germany resumes unrestricted submarine warfare<br />US cuts off diplomatic relations<br />Then the US intercepts the Zimmerman Telegram from Germany to Mexico<br />
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  27. 27. Although Mexico has little love for the United States, the decline the offer – why?<br />German financial support would not be able to reach Mexico in any way<br />No way to control the English speaking US citizens if they were successful<br />Probably can’t win a war against the US<br />Can barely hold together their own government as it is, let alone wage a war. (section 10.4)<br />
  28. 28. Declaration<br />United States declares war on Germany on April 6th, 1917 – three years after the war had started in Europe.<br />Wilson promises to “keep the world safe for democracy.”<br />

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