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Managing Media Literacy and Misinformation

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Managing Media Literacy and Misinformation

  1. 1. Spotting, Managing, and Responding to Online Misinformation Damian Radcliffe Carolyn S. Chambers Professor of Journalism University of Oregon 21st November 2022
  2. 2. Today’s session 1. Spotlight on misinformation 2. Tips and Tools 3. Q&A
  3. 3. I know it’s Week 9… But hopefully that sounds good!
  4. 4. 1. Spotlight on misinformation
  5. 5. What do we mean by misinformation?
  6. 6. How it works
  7. 7. Motive matters
  8. 8. Emerged as a major source of concern from 2016 onwards
  9. 9. Global Issue Multiple topics
  10. 10. How confident are you? Post in the chat: 1-3 = Not very confident 4-6 = Somewhat confident 7-9 = Very confident 10 = I should be giving this talk Damian!
  11. 11. Examples
  12. 12. False context
  13. 13. Footage shown of President Zelensky “out there fighting for his country,” was filmed in 2021. (Screenshot via NewsGuard)
  14. 14. Game footage also used to depict war in Ukraine… and Syria…
  15. 15. Poor journalism
  16. 16. Time, Trump + MLK
  17. 17. Fake websites
  18. 18. Conspiracy theories
  19. 19. Covered by: - Quartz - Elite Daily - Cosmopolitan - BuzzFeed - Digg - MTV - And more! Humor – Parody - Satire
  20. 20. Denial covered by Quartz, Washington Post + others.
  21. 21. What examples have you seen?
  22. 22. Why now? 8 x key factors
  23. 23. 1. Fake news looks a lot like real news
  24. 24. 2. Tech doesn’t discern fact from fiction
  25. 25. 3. Algorithms show us more of what we like, not what we need to know
  26. 26. 4. Fewer Journalists
  27. 27. 5. Trust in Journalism
  28. 28. Two-thirds (67%) of people globally* believe that journalists and reporters purposely try to mislead people by saying things they know are false or grossly exaggerated. An increase of 8% from 2021’s report. * 28 countries, 36,000 respondents
  29. 29. 6. Society + media = more partisan
  30. 30. 7. Discerning fact from fiction becoming harder
  31. 31. 8. Found in different forms + on different platforms
  32. 32. Memes
  33. 33. Claims can be more powerful – and memorable when there’s an image associated with it.
  34. 34. “False information spreads just like accurate information.” Farida Vis, Sheffield University research fellow Remember!
  35. 35. Q: Who should be responsible for addressing this? How do we fix this?
  36. 36. 3. Tips and Tools
  37. 37. 9x recommendations
  38. 38. 1.Consume widely… + develop a list of trust sources
  39. 39. 2. Understand your source
  40. 40. 3. Double check everything
  41. 41. 4. Be skeptical
  42. 42. 5. Learn how to reverse image search
  43. 43. 6. Slow Down
  44. 44. Misinformation can have major consequences
  45. 45. 7. Be mindful as stories break
  46. 46. And where…
  47. 47. 8. Check your emotions
  48. 48. 9. Find reliable fact checking sites Snopes, PolitiFact etc.
  49. 49. Email: damianr@uoregon.edu Twitter: @damianradcliffe Web: www.damianradcliffe.com Thanks for listening

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