What Job SeekersShould Know AboutBackground Checks<br />What good employersare (and aren’t) checking<br />Mike CoffeyPresi...
First, forget everything you’ve ever seen on TV.<br />2<br />
“Contrary to common perception, the FBI’s IIII [the Interstate Identification Index] system is not a complete national dat...
Many employers review criminal cases filed,  not just convictions, within state law limits.<br />4<br />
Motor vehicle reports (MVRs) provide 3 – 5 year driving history and license status.<br />5<br />
Verification of employment, education, license, and certifications claims.<br />6<br />
Credit  (without a FICO score) is often checked on positions with fiduciary responsibility.<br />7<br />
Personal and professional references are sometimes checked.<br />8<br />
Civil litigation, liens, and judgments often checked for senior management.<br />9<br />
Most negative items cannot be reported after 7 years, unless the position pays > $70K.<br />10<br />
In Texas and most other states, criminal convictions can be reported forever.<br />11<br />
A few states, including California, limit the reporting of convictions older than 7 years.<br />12<br />
“National” criminal databases miss many, if not most criminal records but they’re cheap.<br />13<br />
Stephen Barbee<br />Clifton Williams<br />Anthony Shore<br />State databases are also incomplete and often a more expensiv...
The best research is conducted at the county level, this is also the most expensive.<br />15<br />
SURPRISES<br />Number one rule when dealing with prospective employers.<br />16<br />
<ul><li>Have you been convicted of a felony in the last seven years?
Have you ever been convicted of a misdemeanor or felony?
Have you ever had a criminal case filed against you (other than minor traffic offenses for which no arrest was made), rega...
The interview is the time to be forthcoming about past issues.<br />18<br />
Be prepared with:<br /><ul><li>True explanation of circumstances.
Certified copies of charging and disposition documents.
What you learned from the experience.
How your life and decisions since demonstrate that you are safe, trustworthy, and reliable.</li></ul>Have your  “elevator ...
Normal Employer Considerations<br /><ul><li>Nature of the offense.
Relationship to the position.
Time that has passed since release from restriction.
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What Job Seekers Need To Know About Background Checks

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This is the presentation I give to career networking groups, former offender reintegration classes, and other groups who are interested in background checks. See my other presentation for what employers need to know about backgound checks.

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What Job Seekers Need To Know About Background Checks

  1. 1. What Job SeekersShould Know AboutBackground Checks<br />What good employersare (and aren’t) checking<br />Mike CoffeyPresident<br />817-921-5286<br />coffey@imperativeinfo.com<br />
  2. 2. First, forget everything you’ve ever seen on TV.<br />2<br />
  3. 3. “Contrary to common perception, the FBI’s IIII [the Interstate Identification Index] system is not a complete national database of all criminal history records in the United States.”<br />“Many state records, whether from law enforcement agencies or courts, are not included or have not been updated.”<br />“Some criminal history records involve offenses that are not submitted to the FBI.”<br />“Currently, only 50 percent of III arrest records have final dispositions.”<br />The Attorney General’s Report on Criminal History Background Checks, June 2006<br />3<br />
  4. 4. Many employers review criminal cases filed, not just convictions, within state law limits.<br />4<br />
  5. 5. Motor vehicle reports (MVRs) provide 3 – 5 year driving history and license status.<br />5<br />
  6. 6. Verification of employment, education, license, and certifications claims.<br />6<br />
  7. 7. Credit (without a FICO score) is often checked on positions with fiduciary responsibility.<br />7<br />
  8. 8. Personal and professional references are sometimes checked.<br />8<br />
  9. 9. Civil litigation, liens, and judgments often checked for senior management.<br />9<br />
  10. 10. Most negative items cannot be reported after 7 years, unless the position pays > $70K.<br />10<br />
  11. 11. In Texas and most other states, criminal convictions can be reported forever.<br />11<br />
  12. 12. A few states, including California, limit the reporting of convictions older than 7 years.<br />12<br />
  13. 13. “National” criminal databases miss many, if not most criminal records but they’re cheap.<br />13<br />
  14. 14. Stephen Barbee<br />Clifton Williams<br />Anthony Shore<br />State databases are also incomplete and often a more expensive alternative.<br />14<br />
  15. 15. The best research is conducted at the county level, this is also the most expensive.<br />15<br />
  16. 16. SURPRISES<br />Number one rule when dealing with prospective employers.<br />16<br />
  17. 17. <ul><li>Have you been convicted of a felony in the last seven years?
  18. 18. Have you ever been convicted of a misdemeanor or felony?
  19. 19. Have you ever had a criminal case filed against you (other than minor traffic offenses for which no arrest was made), regardless of disposition or outcome; served probation, community service, or completed other conditions to avoid prosecution?</li></ul>Answer the question on the employment application accurately.<br />17<br />
  20. 20. The interview is the time to be forthcoming about past issues.<br />18<br />
  21. 21. Be prepared with:<br /><ul><li>True explanation of circumstances.
  22. 22. Certified copies of charging and disposition documents.
  23. 23. What you learned from the experience.
  24. 24. How your life and decisions since demonstrate that you are safe, trustworthy, and reliable.</li></ul>Have your “elevator speech” ready.<br />19<br />
  25. 25. Normal Employer Considerations<br /><ul><li>Nature of the offense.
  26. 26. Relationship to the position.
  27. 27. Time that has passed since release from restriction.
  28. 28. Total applicant compared with other applicants.
  29. 29. Regulatory/insurance policies.</li></ul>Recognize that some employers’ policies may legitimately automatically disqualify you.<br />20<br />
  30. 30. www.annualcreditreport.com for your free<br />annual credit report from each bureau.<br />21<br />
  31. 31. The federal FCRA ensures applicants’ consumer rights are protected.<br />22<br />
  32. 32. Disclosure must be made and written authorization received.<br />23<br />
  33. 33. The employer must provide information prior to making an adverse decision.<br />24<br />
  34. 34. Applicants have a right to dispute background information to the screening company.<br />25<br />
  35. 35. The employer must provide additional notice after taking the adverse <br />26<br />
  36. 36. Questions<br />Mike Coffey, President817-921-5286, coffey@imperativeinfo.com<br />27<br />

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