High Velocity Human Factors

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This presentation provides a brief primer to High Velocity Human Factors.
A human factors paradigm to analyze affective, cognitive and sociological issues pertaining to mission critical domains such as law enforcement, fire fighting, combat, disaster response, etc.

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High Velocity Human Factors

  1. 1. High Velocity Human Factors Human Factors of Mission Critical Domains in Nonequilibrium Moin Rahman Motorola Plantation, FL 1
  2. 2. A World in Nonequilibrium The only certainty is that there is no certainty - Robert Rubin 2
  3. 3. Nonequilibrium: Human-Machine Systems “Emergency or crisis conditions occur suddenly and often unexpectedly, operators must make critical decisions under extreme stress, and the consequences of poor performance are immediate and catastrophic.” (Salas, Driskell & Hughes, 1996). 3
  4. 4. Nonequilibrium Events Volatile Uncertain Complex Ambiguous “Golden Hour” Time 4
  5. 5. BLACK SWAN extremely rare events - Nicolas Taleb 5
  6. 6. 9/11 Attacks on WTC Poor Situation Awareness - people inside the towers - NORAD - impending collapse (102 minutes) Emotional Stress (triggers) - deafening sounds, shaking building, failure of lighting, dust & debris - threats to life and limb - insufficient time (escape & rescue) 6
  7. 7. NE Spectrum complex multiplayer multi-component Loosely coupled simple few players limited component tightly coupled 7
  8. 8. High Velocity Human Factors NE Meta Characteristics Psychological Reactions (physical-informational-outcome landscape) High velocity of events High Velocity of information Non-linear dynamics processing Naturalistic setting Emotionally modulated cognition - ill structured Event perception - ill defined - volatile - high stakes - uncertain - incomplete information - complex - ambiguous Naturalistic decision making High stakes: e.g., direct threat to life & limb 8
  9. 9. HVHF Dimensions Velocity differential dimension (Vel-D) Psychophysiologial dimension Decision-making dimension 9
  10. 10. Vel-D Dimension Δ Information processing rate emotion-induced e.g., attentional rubbernecking, auditory exclusion, tachypsychia event-agent interactions autocatalysis: Vel-D becomes its own catalyst (exponential rise) 10
  11. 11. Psychophysiological Dimension neurological & physiological reactions behaviors: highly aroused sympathetic nervous system - autovigilance - response competition - attentional capacity - hormonal overflow - behavioral inhibition - regressive behavior (e.g., death blossom and burst reaction) parasympathetic backlash 11
  12. 12. Decision-making Dimension hypervigilant decision making (Johnston, et al., 1997) recognition primed decision making (klein, 1999) decision-making heuristics (Wickens, 1992) 12
  13. 13. HVHF Challenge Unknown unknowns Known unknowns 13
  14. 14. HVHF Example 14
  15. 15. HVHF Analysis Dimensional Experiential Design Vel-D Oral history Standard HF Psychophysiological Simulations HVHF Decision-making HVHF Drills Hybrid: HFHVHF 15
  16. 16. HVHF Application: prevent fratricide (blue- on-blue) 16
  17. 17. HVHF Applications 17
  18. 18. HVHF Laws (prescriptive) 1) Law of Relevance 6) Law of Absoluteness 2) Law of Acceptance 7) Law of Intelligence 3) Law of Transparence 8) Law of Reliance 4) Law of Clairvoyance 18
  19. 19. Closing Thoughts • HVHF: A HF paradigm for Mission Critical Domain Non-equilibrium Emotional modulation of cognition Three HVHF dimensions (Vel-D, Psychophysiological & Decision making) • A HVHF approach Analysis Design Training 19
  20. 20. Contact Info: moin.rahman@motorola.com ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author thanks Mark Palmer (Senior Manager, Motorola) for giving him the opportunity to explore un-chartered waters in the human factors sciences; and, Tim Bergin, for reviewing the manuscript and providing insightful comments. 20

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