TechNet Webcast: Exchange 2010 High Availability

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Welcome to the future! The future of Exchange high availability, that is. In this webcast, we reveal the changes and improvements to the built-in high availability platform in Exchange Server 2010. Exchange 2010 includes a unified framework for high availability and disaster recovery that is quick to deploy and easy to manage. Learn about all of the new features in Exchange 2010 that make it the most resilient, highly available version of Exchange ever.

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TechNet Webcast: Exchange 2010 High Availability

  1. 1. High Availability in<br />Scott Schnoll<br />scott.schnoll@microsoft.com<br />Principal Technical Writer<br />Microsoft Corporation<br />
  2. 2. Agenda<br />Exchange 2010 High Availability Vision/Goals<br />Exchange 2010 High Availability Features<br />Exchange 2010 High Availability Deep Dive<br />Deploying Exchange 2010 High Availability Features<br />Transitioning to Exchange 2010 High Availability<br />End-to-End Availability Improvements<br />High Availability Design Examples<br />
  3. 3. High Availability Vision and Goals<br />
  4. 4. Exchange 2010 High Availability Vision and Goals<br />Vision: Deliver a fast, easy-to-deploy and operate, economical solution that can provide messaging service continuity for all customers<br />Goals<br />Deliver a solution for high availability and site resilience that is native to Exchange<br />Enable less expensive and less complex storage<br />Simplify administration and reduce support costs<br />Increase end-to-end availability<br />Support Exchange Server 2010 Online<br />
  5. 5. Exchange 2010 High Availability Solution<br />Unified technology for high availability and site resilience<br />New framework for creating highly available Mailboxes<br />Evolution of continuous replication technology<br />Can be deployed on a range of storage options<br />Native to Exchange; not bolted onto the side<br />
  6. 6. Dallas <br />Complex site resilience and recovery<br />DB1<br />Outlook<br />OWA, ActiveSync, or Outlook Anywhere<br />DB2<br />Standby Cluster<br />DB3<br />Clustered Mailbox Server had to be created manually<br />San Jose<br />Front End Server<br />Third-party data replication needed for site resilience<br />NodeB(passive)<br />NodeA(active)<br />Clustering knowledge required<br />Failover at Mailbox server level<br />DB1<br />DB4<br />DB2<br />DB5<br />DB3<br />DB6<br />Exchange Server 2003<br />
  7. 7. Dallas <br />Complex activation for remote server / datacenter<br />DB1<br />SCR<br />Outlook<br />OWA, ActiveSync, or Outlook Anywhere<br />DB2<br />Standby Cluster<br />DB3<br />Clustered Mailbox Server can’t co-exist with other roles<br />San Jose<br />Client Access Server<br />No GUI to manage SCR<br />NodeB(passive)<br />NodeA(active)<br />CCR<br />Clustering knowledge required<br />DB1<br />DB4<br />DB1<br />DB4<br />DB2<br />DB2<br />DB5<br />DB5<br />Failover at Mailbox server level<br />DB3<br />DB3<br />DB6<br />DB6<br />Exchange Server 2007<br />
  8. 8. Dallas <br />All clients connect via CAS servers<br />DB1<br />DB3<br />Client<br />DB5<br />Mailbox Server 6<br />San Jose<br />Easy to extend across sites<br />Client Access Server<br />Failover managed by/with Exchange<br />Mailbox Server 1<br />Mailbox Server 2<br />Mailbox Server 3<br />Mailbox Server 4<br />Mailbox Server 5<br />DB1<br />DB4<br />DB1<br />DB5<br />DB3<br />DB2<br />Database level failover<br />DB5<br />DB2<br />DB1<br />DB4<br />DB3<br />DB3<br />DB1<br />DB2<br />DB4<br />DB5<br />Exchange Server 2010<br />
  9. 9. Exchange Server 2010High Availability Features<br />
  10. 10. Exchange 2010 High Availability Feature Names<br />Mailbox Resiliency – Name of Unified High Availability and Site Resilience Solution<br />Database Availability Group – A group of up to 16 Mailbox servers that host a set of replicated databases<br />Mailbox Database Copy – A mailbox database (.edb file and logs) that is either active or passive<br />Database Mobility – The ability of a single mailbox database to be replicated to and mounted on other mailbox servers<br />
  11. 11. Exchange 2010 High Availability Feature Names<br />RPC Client Access service – A Client Access server feature that provides a MAPI endpoint for Outlook clients<br />Shadow Redundancy – A transport feature that provides redundancy for messages for the entire time they are in transit<br />Incremental Deployment – The ability to deploy high availability /site resilience after Exchange is installed<br />Exchange Third Party Replication API – An Exchange-provided API that enables use of third-party replication for a DAG in lieu of continuous replication<br />
  12. 12. Exchange 2010 High Availability Terminology<br />High Availability – Solution must provide data availability, service availability, and automatic recovery from failures<br />Disaster Recovery – Process used to manually recover from a failure<br />Site Resilience – Disaster recovery solution used for recovery from site failure<br />*over – Short for switchover/failover; a switchover is a manual activation of one or more databases; a failover is an automatic activation of one or more databases after a failure<br />
  13. 13. Exchange 2010 *overs<br />Within a datacenter<br />Database or server *overs<br />Datacenter level: switchover<br />Between datacenters<br />Database or server *overs<br />Assumptions:<br />Each datacenter is a separate Active Directory site<br />Each datacenter has live, active messaging services<br />Standby datacenter must be active to support single database *over<br />
  14. 14. Exchange 2007 Concepts Brought Forward<br />Extensible Storage Engine (ESE)<br />Databases and log files<br />Continuous Replication<br />Log shipping and replay<br />Database seeding<br />Store service/Replication service<br />Database health and status monitoring<br />Divergence<br />Automatic database mount behavior<br />Concepts of quorum and witness<br />Concepts of *overs<br />
  15. 15. Exchange 2010 Deprecated Concepts<br />Storage Groups<br />Databases identified by the server on which they live<br />Server names as part of database names<br />Clustered Mailbox Servers<br />Pre-installing a Windows Failover Cluster<br />Running Setup in Clustered Mode<br />Moving a CMS network identity between servers<br />Shared Storage<br />Two HA Copy Limits<br />Private and Public Networks<br />
  16. 16. Exchange 2010 High Availability Deep Dive<br />
  17. 17. Exchange 2010 HA Fundamentals<br />RPC CAS<br />Database Availability Group<br />Server<br />Database<br />Database Copy<br />Active Manager<br />RPC Client Access<br />SVR<br />DB<br />DB<br />copy<br />copy<br />copy<br />copy<br />AM<br />AM<br />SVR<br />DAG<br />RPC CAS<br />
  18. 18. Database Availability Group (DAG)<br />Base component of high availability and site resilience<br />A group of up to 16 servers that host a set of replicated databases<br />“Wraps” a Windows Failover Cluster<br />Manages membership (DAG member = node)<br />Provides heartbeat of DAG member servers<br />Active Manager stores data in cluster database<br />Defines a boundary for:<br />Mailbox database replication<br />Database and server *overs<br />Active Manager<br />
  19. 19. Mailbox Database Replication<br />Continuous Replication<br />Uses TCP instead of SMB<br />Supports encryption and compression<br />Supports multiple replication networks<br />Third Party Replication API<br />Intended for 3rd party synchronous replication<br />
  20. 20. Active Manager<br />Exchange component that manages *overs<br />Runs on every server in the DAG<br />Selects best available copy on failovers<br />Is the definitive source of information on where a database is active<br />Stores this information in cluster database<br />Provides this information to other Exchange components (e.g., RPC Client Access and Hub Transport)<br />Two Active Manager roles: PAM and SAM<br />
  21. 21. Active Manager<br />Primary Active Manager (PAM)<br />Runs on the node that owns the cluster group<br />Gets topology change notifications<br />Reacts to server failures<br />Selects the best database copy on *overs<br />Standby Active Manager (SAM)<br />Runs on every other node in the DAG<br />Responds to queries about which server hosts the active copy of the mailbox database<br />Both roles are necessary for automatic recovery<br />If Replication service is stopped, automatic recovery will not happen<br />
  22. 22. Active ManagerSelection of Active Database Copy<br />Active Manager selects the “best” copy to become active when existing active fails<br />Ignores servers that are unreachable or activation is temporarily or regularly blocked<br />Sorts copies by currency to minimize data loss<br />Breaks ties during sort based on Activation Preference<br />Selects from sorted listed based on copy status of each copy<br />
  23. 23. Active ManagerSelection of Active Database Copy<br />Active Manager selects the “best” copy to become active when existing active fails<br />8<br />6<br />9<br />5<br />7<br />10<br />Catalog Crawling<br />Copy status Healthy, DisconnectedAndHealthy,DisconnectedAndResynchronizing, orSeedingSource<br />CopyQueueLength &lt; 10<br />Catalog Healthy<br />Copy status Healthy, DisconnectedAndHealthy,DisconnectedAndResynchronizing, orSeedingSource<br />Catalog Crawling<br />Copy status Healthy, DisconnectedAndHealthy,DisconnectedAndResynchronizing, orSeedingSource<br />Catalog Healthy<br />Copy status Healthy, DisconnectedAndHealthy,DisconnectedAndResynchronizing, orSeedingSource<br />CopyQueueLength &lt; 10<br />ReplayQueueLength &lt; 50<br />Catalog Crawling<br />Copy status Healthy, DisconnectedAndHealthy,DisconnectedAndResynchronizing, orSeedingSource<br />CopyQueueLength &lt; 10<br />ReplayQueueLength &lt; 50<br />Catalog Healthy<br />Copy status Healthy, DisconnectedAndHealthy,DisconnectedAndResynchronizing, orSeedingSource<br />ReplayQueueLength &lt; 50<br />Catalog Crawling<br />Copy status Healthy, DisconnectedAndHealthy,DisconnectedAndResynchronizing, orSeedingSource<br />ReplayQueueLength &lt; 50<br />Catalog Healthy<br />Copy status Healthy, DisconnectedAndHealthy,DisconnectedAndResynchronizing, orSeedingSource<br />CopyQueueLength &lt; 10<br />Copy status Healthy, DisconnectedAndHealthy,DisconnectedAndResynchronizing, orSeedingSource<br />ReplayQueueLength &lt; 50<br />Copy status Healthy, DisconnectedAndHealthy,DisconnectedAndResynchronizing, orSeedingSource<br />
  24. 24. Example: Database Failover<br />Database failure occurs<br />Failure item is raised<br />Active Manager moves active database<br />Database copy is restored<br />Similar flow within and across datacenters<br />DAG<br />Mailbox Server 1<br />Mailbox Server 2<br />Mailbox Server 3<br />Mailbox Server 4<br />Mailbox Server 5<br />DB3<br />DB2<br />DB4<br />DB3<br />DB4<br />DB1<br />DB5<br />DB4<br />DB5<br />DB5<br />DB2<br />DB1<br />DB3<br />DB1<br />DB2<br />
  25. 25. Example: Server Failover<br />Server failure occurs<br />Cluster notification of node down<br />Active Manager moves active databases<br />Server is restored<br />Cluster notification of node up<br />Database copies resynchronize with active databases<br />Similar flow within and across datacenters<br />DAG<br />Mailbox Server 1<br />Mailbox Server 2<br />Mailbox Server 3<br />Mailbox Server 4<br />Mailbox Server 5<br />DB3<br />DB2<br />DB4<br />DB3<br />DB4<br />DB1<br />DB5<br />DB4<br />DB5<br />DB5<br />DB2<br />DB1<br />DB3<br />DB1<br />DB2<br />
  26. 26. DAG Lifecycle<br />DAG is created initially as empty object in Active Directory<br />Continuous replication or 3rd party replication using Third Party Replication mode<br />When first Mailbox server is added to a DAG<br />A Windows failover cluster is formed with a Node Majority quorum using the name of the DAG <br />The server is added to the DAG object in Active Directory<br />A cluster network object (CNO) for the DAG is created in the built-in Computers container<br />One or more IP addresses is assigned to the DAG<br />The Name and IP address(s) of the DAG is registered in DNS<br />The cluster database for the DAG is updated with info on configured databases, including if they are locally active (which they should be)<br />
  27. 27. DAG Lifecycle<br />When second and subsequent Mailbox server is added to a DAG<br />The server is joined to cluster for the DAG<br />The quorum model is automatically adjusted<br />Node Majority - DAGs with odd number of members<br />Node and File Share Majority - DAGs with even number of members<br />File share witness cluster resource, directory, and share are automatically created by Exchange when needed<br />Additional specified IP addresses are added to the DAG and registered in DNS<br />The server is added to the DAG object in Active Directory<br />The cluster database for the DAG is updated with info on configured databases, including if they are locally active (which they should be)<br />
  28. 28. DAG Lifecycle<br />After servers have been added to a DAG<br />Configure the DAG<br />Network Encryption<br />Network Compression<br />Configure DAG networks<br />Network subnets<br />Enable/disable MAPI traffic/replication<br />Create mailbox database copies<br />Seeding is performed automatically<br />Monitor health and status of database copies<br />Perform switchovers as needed<br />
  29. 29. DAG Lifecycle<br />Before you can remove a server from a DAG, you must first remove all replicated databases from the server<br />When a server is removed from a DAG:<br />The server is evicted from the cluster<br />The cluster quorum is adjusted as needed<br />The server is removed from the DAG object in Active Directory<br />Before you can remove a DAG, you must first remove all servers from the DAG<br />
  30. 30. Deploying Exchange 2010 High Availability Features<br />
  31. 31. Deploying Exchange 2010 HA Features<br />
  32. 32. Exchange 2010 Incremental Deployment (Beta)<br />Create a DAGNew-DatabaseAvailabilityGroup -Name DAG1 -FileShareWitnessShare XHUB1DAG1FSW -FileShareWitnessDirectory C:DAG1FSW<br />Add first Mailbox Server to DAGAdd-DatabaseAvailbilityGroupServer -Identity DAG1 -MailboxServer EXMBX1 -DatabaseAvailablityGroupIpAddresses 10.0.0.8<br />Add second and subsequent Mailbox ServerAdd-DatabaseAvailabilityGroupServer -Identity DAG1 -MailboxServer EXMBX2Add-DatabaseAvailabilityGroupServer -Identity DAG1 -MailboxServer EXMBX2 -DatabaseAvailablityGroupIpAddresses 10.0.0.8,10.0.1.8<br />Add Mailbox Database CopyAdd-MailboxDatabaseCopy -Identity MBXDB1 -MailboxServer EXMBX3<br />Extend as needed<br />
  33. 33. Transitioning to Exchange 2010 High Availability<br />
  34. 34. Transition Steps<br />Verify that you meet requirements for Exchange 2010<br />Deploy Exchange 2010<br />Use Exchange 2010 mailbox move features to migrate<br />Unsupported Transitions<br />In-place upgrade to Exchange 2010 from any previous version of Exchange<br />Using database portability between Exchange 2010 and non-Exchange 2010 databases<br />Backup and restore of earlier versions of Exchange databases on Exchange 2010<br />Using continuous replication between Exchange 2010 and Exchange 2007<br />
  35. 35. Exchange 2010 End-to-End Availability Improvements<br />
  36. 36. Exchange 2010 End-to-End Availability Improvements<br />Online Move Mailbox<br />Supported between Exchange 2010 databases, and between Exchange 2007 SP2 and Exchange 2010 databases<br />User can access their mailbox while move is in progress<br />Move is performed asynchronouslyby a new service called the Microsoft Exchange Mailbox Replication Service (MRS), which runs on Client Access servers<br />E-Mail Client<br />Client Access Server<br />Mailbox Server 1<br />Mailbox Server 2<br />
  37. 37. Exchange 2010 End-to-End Availability Improvements<br />RPC Client Access service<br />A new service that establishes a RPC endpoint for client access on the CAS role to replace the existing RPC endpoint on the Mailbox role<br />New RPC endpoint entirely re-written in managed code<br />Re-factored common business logic from Exchange 2007 that overlaps with what is needed by the RPC endpoint<br />Cmdlets, performance counters, etc. to manage and monitor<br />Does not replace RPC endpoint for public folder databases; Outlook clients logon directly with public folder store to access public folder databases<br />
  38. 38. Exchange 2010 End-to-End Availability Improvements<br /><ul><li>Shadow Redundancy</li></ul>Mailbox <br />Server <br />X<br />EdgeTransport<br />Servers keep “shadow copies” of items until they are delivered to the next hop<br />Also helps simplify Hub and Edge Transport Server upgrades and maintenance<br />HubTransport <br />Edge Transport<br />
  39. 39. Exchange 2010 End-to-End Availability Improvements<br />Transport Dumpster Improvements<br />Gets feedback from replication pipeline to let it know when to delete items<br />Once something has been delivered, and the logs for the message are replicated, transport dumpster can delete the message<br />Replay is not required for deleting items from dumpster; only data in dumpster is data that has not yet been replicated<br />Responds to requests for redelivery after lossy failover both within its Active Directory site and across Active Directory sites (old site and new site)<br />
  40. 40. Exchange 2010 End-to-End Availability Improvements<br />Using 3 or more database copies enables you to use replication for your backups<br />Site/Server/Disk failure<br />Archiving/Compliance<br />Recover deleted items<br />Exchange 2010 HA<br />E-mail Archive<br />Hold Policy<br />Database Availability Group<br />Mailbox Server 1<br />Mailbox Server 3<br />Mailbox Server 2<br />DB1<br />DB1<br />DB1<br />DB2<br />DB2<br />DB2<br />X<br />DB3<br />DB3<br />DB3<br />
  41. 41. Exchange Server 2010 High Availability Design Examples<br />
  42. 42. High Availability Design ExampleBranch/Small Office Design<br />Hardware Load Balancer<br />8 processor cores recommended with a maximum of 64GB RAM<br />Member servers of DAG can host other server roles<br />Client Access<br />Hub Transport<br />Mailbox<br />Client AccessHub TransportMailbox<br />DB1<br />DB1<br />UM role not recommended for co-location<br />2-server DAGs should use RAID<br />DB2<br />DB2<br />DB2<br />DB3<br />DB3<br />
  43. 43. High Availability Design ExampleDouble Node/Disk Failure Resilience<br />AD: Dublin<br /><ul><li>Single Site
  44. 44. 4 Nodes
  45. 45. 3 HA Copies
  46. 46. JBOD -> 3+ Copies
  47. 47. Upgrade Server 1
  48. 48. Server 2 fails
  49. 49. Server 1 upgrade done
  50. 50. 2 active copies die</li></ul>CAS NLB Farm<br />X<br />Mailbox<br />Server 1<br />Mailbox<br />Server 2<br />Mailbox<br />Server 3<br />Mailbox<br />Server 4<br />X<br />DB6<br />DB4<br />DB5<br />DB3<br />DB7<br />DB5<br />DB2<br />DB1<br />DB3<br />DB8<br />DB7<br />DB1<br />DB8<br />DB1<br />DB2<br />DB6<br />DB7<br />DB8<br />DB5<br />DB4<br />DB6<br />DB2<br />DB3<br />DB4<br />Database Availability Group (DAG)<br />
  51. 51. High Availability for Other Server Roles<br />
  52. 52. Key Takeaways<br />Greater end-to-end availability with Mailbox Resiliency<br />Unified framework for high availability and site resilience<br />Faster and easier to deploy with Incremental Deployment<br />Reduced TCO with core ESE architecture changes and more storage options<br />Supports large mailboxes for less money<br />
  53. 53. Questions and Answers<br />Submit text questions using the “Ask” button. <br />Don’t forget to fill out the survey.<br />For upcoming and previously live webcasts: www.microsoft.com/webcast<br />Got webcast content ideas? Contact us at: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=41781<br />
  54. 54. Additional Resources<br />Exchange Server 2010 Webcasts<br />Exchange 2010 Overview (June 3rd, 9am PST)<br />Exchange 2010 Management Tools (June 8th, 1pm PST)<br />Exchange 2010 Archiving and Retention (June 10, 9am PST)<br />http://msexchangeteam.com/archive/2009/05/26/451465.aspx<br />Download the Exchange Server 2010 Betahttp://technet.microsoft.com/evalcenter/dd185495.aspx<br />Read the Exchange Server 2010 Documentationhttp://technet.microsoft.com/library/bb124558(EXCHG.140).aspx<br />Read Exchange Team Blog Postshttp://msexchangeteam.com/archive/category/11164.aspx<br />Participate in Exchange Server 2010 Forumshttp://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/exchange2010/threads<br />

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