Stress eating & obesity

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A review of the literature on stress, eating and obesity.

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Stress eating & obesity

  1. 1. Stress Eating & Obesity<br />Role of exercise in decreasing effects of stress & weight gain<br />From: Montes, M. & Kravitz, L. 2011. Unraveling the Stress-Eating –Obesity Knot. IDEA Fitness Journal, 2, 44-50.<br />
  2. 2. Stress<br />Stress: A nonspecific response of the body to stimulus which overcomes or threatens to overcome the body’s ability to maintain homeostasis. <br />Types of stress:<br />Social (personal conflicts)<br />Physiological (pain, exercise, heat, cold)<br />Psychological or emotional (fear, sorrow, anxiety)<br />Chemical (low oxygen)<br />
  3. 3. The body responds to acute stress<br />Release of stress hormones (epinephrine, norepinephrine)<br />These hormones trigger “fight or flight” response<br />Acutestressor<br />Response from Adrenal glands<br />Blood pressure<br />Blood fats<br />Heart rate<br />Blood flow to kidneys, skin & digestive system<br />Increase in epinephrine, norepinephrine, testosterone<br />Decreased appetite and food intake<br />
  4. 4. The body responds to chronic stress<br />Release of cortisol via message hormone ACTH (process known as HPA axis)<br />Appetite<br />Anxiety, depression, apathy<br />Activation of lipoprotein lipase<br />Deposit of visceral fat <br />Fat and sugar in diet<br />Fat break down<br />Chronicstressor<br />HPA axis<br />Insulin<br />Cortisol<br />Increased weight gain, leading to overweight, obesity<br />
  5. 5. Summary: Effects of Chronic Stress<br />Increased fat storage, especially in belly area<br />Stimulated appetite, especially for fats and sugars<br />Emotional changes (anxiety, apathy, depression)<br />Stress induced eating is possible response to chronic stress<br />
  6. 6. Stress induced eating<br />Defined as making oneself feel better by eating or drinking in response to a stressful situation<br />Two models:<br />General Effects (stress will induce some type of psychological change that results in eating)<br />Individual differences effects (Background learning, personal attitudes and biological differences might influence eating habits in stressful times)<br />
  7. 7. Exercise and Stress<br />According to Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee Report (2008): Physical activity can protect against feelings of distress, defend against symptoms of anxiety, guard against depressive symptoms and development of major depressive disorder and enhance psychological well being. <br />Since 1995, more than 30 studies, involving more than 175,000 people have been conducted!<br />“Best” stress reducing benefits: 30 – 60 minutes of any aerobic type activity, moderate to vigorous intensity, 5 days a week.<br />
  8. 8. Mind-Body programs and stress<br />Research suggests mind-body programs reduce recurrence of myocardial infarctions & other coronary events. Integrating mind-body into traditional medical intervention should be priority.<br />
  9. 9. 10 Strategies to cope with stress<br />Exercise: Cardiovascular, resistance & mind-body<br />Meditation<br />Progressive muscle relaxation<br />Time management<br />Support Systems<br />Healthy food & drink<br />Posture check<br />Recharging (planned relaxation breaks)<br />Speaking slowly<br />Visualization (as in a nice outdoor scene)<br />
  10. 10. This PowerPoint was adopted from the article in a recent Idea Fitness Journal. <br />Montes, M. & Kravitz, L. 2011. Unraveling the Stress-Eating –Obesity Knot. IDEA Fitness Journal, 2, 44-50.<br />

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