61 minutes EBMS amsterdam

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Powerpoint presented at the 1st Equine Business Management Strategies Program on August, 24 in Amsterdam.
This presentation is an overview of the business, social media and lifestyle stories of the past year that are of concern to equine veterinarians.

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  • The report "assesses the ability of countries to provide high levels of prosperity to their citizens. This in turn depends on how productively a country uses available resources. Therefore, the Global Competitiveness Index measures the set of institutions, policies, and factors that set the sustainable current and medium-term levels of economic prosperity. by the  World Economic Forum
  • The  Ease of Doing Business Index  is an index created by the  World Bank . Higher rankings indicate better, usually simpler, regulations for businesses and stronger protections of property rights. Empirical research funded by the World Bank to justify their work claims to show that the effect of improving these regulations on economic growth is strong The Ease of Doing Business index is meant to measure regulations directly affecting businesses and does not directly measure more general conditions such as a nation's proximity to large markets, quality of infrastruc ture ,  inflatio n , or  crime . A n ation's r anking on the index is based on the average of 10 subindices:
  • Starting a business - Procedures, time, cost and minimum capital to open a new business Dealing with licenses - Procedures, time and cost of business inspections and licensing (construction industry) Hiring and firing workers - Difficulty of hiring index, rigidity of hours of index, difficulty of firing index, hiring cost and firing cost Registering property - Procedures, time and cost to register commercial real estate Getting credit - Strength of legal rights index, depth of credit information index Protecting investors - Indices on the extent of disclosure, extent of director liability and ease of shareholder suits Paying taxes - Number of taxes paid, hours per year spent preparing tax returns and total tax payable as share of gross profit Trading across borders - Number of documents, number of signatures and time necessary to export and import Enforcing contracts - Procedures, time and cost to enforce a debt contract Closing a business - Time and cost to close down a business, and recovery rate
  • The U.S. economy grew by an average of 3.8% from 1946 to 1973, while real median household income surged 55% (or 1.6% a year).  The economy since 1973, however, has been characterized by both slower growth (averaging 2.7%), and nearly stagnant living standards, with household incomes increasing by 10%, or only 0.3% annually. The worst recession in recent decades, in terms of lost output, occurred during the  2008 financial crisis , when GDP fell by 3.9% from the spring of 2008 to the spring of 2009. Other significant recessions took place in 1957–58, when GDP fell 3.7%, following the  1973 oil crisis , with a 3.1% fall fr om late 1973 to early 1975, and in the 1981–82 recession, when GDP dropped by 2.9%.   Recent, mild recessions have included the 1990–91 downturn, when output fell by 1.3%, and the 2001 recession, in which GDP slid by 0.3%; the 2001 downturn lasted just eight months.  The most vigorous, sustained periods of growth, on the other hand, took place from early 1961 to mid 1969, with an expansion of 53% (5.1% a year), from early 1991 to late in 2000, at 43% (3.8% a year), and from late 1982 to mid 1990, at 37% (4% a year).
  • In 1980, the U.S. public debt was $909 billion - or an amount equal to 33.3% of America's gross domestic product (GDP). By 1990, that number had more than tripled to $3.2 trillion - or 55.9% of GDP. In 2001 the national debt was $5.7 trillion; however, the debt-to-GDP ratio remained at 1990 levels. Debt levels rose quickly in the following decade, and on January 28, 2010, the US debt ceiling was raised to $14.3 trillion dollars. Based on the 2010 U.S. budget, total national debt will grow to nearly 100% of GDP, versus a level of approximately 80% in early 2009.  The White House estimates that the government’s tab for servicing the debt will exceed $700 billion a year in 2019, up from $202 billion in 2009. The U.S. Treasury statistics indicate that, at the end of 2006, non-US citizens and institutions held 44% of federal debt  held by the public . China, holding $801.5 billion in treasury bonds, is the largest foreign financier of the record U.S. public debt.
  • The European Union has the largest economy in the world. The EU economy is expected to grow further over the next decade as more countries join the union – especially considering that the new States are usually poorer than the EU average, and hence the expected fast GDP growth will help achieve the dynamic of the united Europe. It is estimated that the Eurozone will grow around 2.6 per cent this year (2006), on a par with other industrialized nations such as the United States at 2.6% (Q2 2006) and 1.6 (Q3 2006).
  • This is a list of European nations sorted by their Gross Domestic P roduct (GDP) , the valu e of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. The GDP dollar estimates presented here are derived from purchasing power parity (PPP) calculat ions, in millions of In ternational dollars . The table below includes data for the years 2007, 2008, 200 9, 2010. Data produced by the International Monetary Fund as of October 2009. the European Communities . With ov er 500 million citizens, th e EU combined generated an estimated 28% share (US$ 1 6.5 trillion) of the nominal and about 21% (US$14.8 trillion) of the PPP gross world product in 2009.
  • This is a list of European nations sorted by their Gross Domestic P roduct (GDP) , the valu e of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. The GDP dollar estimates presented here are derived from purchasing power parity (PPP) calculat ions, in millions of In ternational dollars . The table below includes data for the years 2007, 2008, 200 9, 2010. Data produced by the International Monetary Fund as of October 2009. the European Communities . With ov er 500 million citizens, th e EU combined generated an estimated 28% share (US$ 1 6.5 trillion) of the nominal and about 21% (US$14.8 trillion) of the PPP gross world product in 2009.
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