Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Adverbs

17,559 views

Published on

Student Teaching Adverb powerpoint notes

Published in: Education

Adverbs

  1. 1. Ms. Pinzon 28 September 2010
  2. 2. 11-1—What is an adverb? <ul><li>An adverb is a word that tells more about a verb, a verb phrase, and adjective, or another adverb. </li></ul><ul><li>An adverb tells how, where, when, or how many times an action takes place. </li></ul>
  3. 3. What is an adverb? <ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>She hung posters quickly. ( tells how ) </li></ul><ul><li>She hung posters everywhere. ( tells where ) </li></ul><ul><li>She hung posters yesterday. ( tells when ) </li></ul><ul><li>She hung posters twice. ( tells how many times ) </li></ul>
  4. 4. 11-2 –Adverbs that tell more about adjectives <ul><li>Some adverbs tell more about adjectives. These adverbs tell to what degree. </li></ul><ul><li>Some examples of adverbs that tell more about adjectives are shown in the box. </li></ul>Adverbs almost especially extremely fairly quite rather really somewhat too truly unusually very
  5. 5. <ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Remember: Adjectives describe nouns and pronouns. </li></ul><ul><li>That is very powerful car. (Very tells how powerful the car is.) </li></ul><ul><li>The car is too expensive for me. (Too tells how expensive the car is.) </li></ul><ul><li>The engine is rather unsafe. (Rather tells how unsafe the engine is.) </li></ul>Adverbs almost especially extremely fairly quite rather really somewhat too truly unusually very
  6. 6. 11-3 –Adverbs that tell more about other adverbs <ul><li>The manager spoke fairly briefly. (Fairly tells how briefly.) </li></ul><ul><li>He hit the ball especially hard. (Especially tells how hard.) </li></ul><ul><li>Ted played rather well. (Rather tells how well.) </li></ul>Adverbs almost especially extremely fairly quite rather really somewhat too truly unusually very
  7. 7. 11-4—Knowing when to use adjectives and adverbs <ul><li>Use adjective to tell more about nouns and pronouns. </li></ul><ul><li>Use adverbs to tell more about verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs. </li></ul><ul><li>Use the adjective good to tell more about a noun or pronoun. Use the adverb well to tell more about a verb or verb phrase. </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Examples: </li></ul><ul><li>The man’s voice was loud. (the adjective loud tells more about the noun voice. </li></ul><ul><li>It rained quite heavily. ( the adverb quite tells more about eh adverb heavily.) </li></ul><ul><li>Ms. Pablo has a good car. ( the adjectiv e good tells more about the noun car.) </li></ul>
  9. 9. 11-5—Using Adverbs to Make comparisons <ul><li>Adverbs can be used to compare two or more actions. To compare two actions, use an – er ending with a few short adverbs. Use more or less before most adverbs. </li></ul><ul><li>When you compare more than two actions, use an </li></ul><ul><li>– est ending with a few short adverbs. Use mos t or leas t with longer adverbs. </li></ul><ul><li>The forms of the adverb well are well , bette r, and bes t. Use better when comparing two. Use best when comparing more than two. </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>Examples: </li></ul><ul><li>He walks faster than his brother. </li></ul><ul><li> He walks more quickly than his brother </li></ul><ul><li> He walks less quickly than his brother. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Jenny spoke the earliest of all the guest speakers. </li></ul><ul><li>Vanessa spoke the most thoughtfully of al the guest speakers. </li></ul><ul><li>Elizabeth spoke the least thoughtfully of all the guest speakers. </li></ul><ul><li>3. John writes well. </li></ul><ul><li>Nick writes better than his friend. </li></ul><ul><li>Who writes the best of all? </li></ul>
  11. 11. 11-6—Avoiding double negatives <ul><li>Using negatives correctly </li></ul><ul><li>**A negative is a word or phrase that means “no.” Some negative words are adverbs. </li></ul><ul><li>The words in the box are negatives. </li></ul>Negatives Barely Hardly Neither Never No Nobody None Not Nothing Nowhere No one scarcely
  12. 12. <ul><li>A negative word may change the whole meaning of a sentence. Use only one negative word to make a sentence mean no or not. Avoid double negatives. </li></ul><ul><li>Incorrect: No one never understands how I feel. (double negative) </li></ul><ul><li>Correct: No one ever understands how I feel. (one negative) </li></ul><ul><li>Correct: Hardly anyone ever understands how I feel. (one negative) </li></ul>Negatives Barely Hardly Neither Never No Nobody None Not Nothing Nowhere No one scarcely
  13. 13. Using Contractions Correctly: <ul><li>The word not can be joined to a verb to form a contraction. </li></ul><ul><li>A contraction is a shortened form of a group of words. </li></ul><ul><li>An apostrophe takes the place of the missing letter or letters. </li></ul><ul><li>Some contractions are shown in the box . </li></ul>Verb +Not Contraction Verb + Not Contraction are + not aren’t should + not shouldn’t could + not couldn’t was + not wasn’t did + not didn’t were + not weren’t do + not don’t will + not won’t is + not isn’t would + not wouldn’t
  14. 14. <ul><li>When you use a contraction with the word not, </li></ul><ul><li>do not use another negative word in the sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>Incorrect: Bob didn’t do nothing . </li></ul><ul><li>Correct: Bob didn’t do anything. </li></ul><ul><li>Correct: Bob did nothing. </li></ul>
  15. 15. 11-7—Specific Adverbs <ul><li>Using specific adverbs can make your writing clearer and more interesting. </li></ul><ul><li>Read these three sentences. Decide which sentence gives the clearest picture.. Why? </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>Nina skated. </li></ul><ul><li>Nina skated well. </li></ul><ul><li>Nina skated quickly and gracefully </li></ul>

×