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College of Arts
                      School of Education

                Bankstown & Penrith Campuses




Professional Experience
       Protocols


                             2011

The Teaching Profession and the University Working in Partnership

                        www.uws.edu.au
University Contacts

For administrative enquiries (eg pay claims, placements, insurance details) or in the
case of an emergency please contact:


             Sonia Bodnaruk
             Professional Experience Administrative Officer (Secondary)
             Phone: 02 4736 0068
             Fax: 02 4736 0407
             Email: s.bodnaruk@uws.edu.au



Academic enquiries regarding the professional experience in the first instance
should be directed to the nominated University Advisor who will contact the school


For specific information regarding the unit (subject) requirements or if you have any
feedback please contact the Professional Experience Academic Co-ordinator:



Professional Experience Academic Co-ordinator: Mary Mooney

Office Location: Building J Room 1.13 – Penrith (Kingswood) Campus

Phone: (02) 4736 0325

Fax: (02) 4736 0407

Email: m.mooney@uws.edu.au




                                 Postal Address
                   Professional Experience Unit- Penrith Campus
                                School of Education
                           University of Western Sydney
                                 Locked Bag 1797
                               PENRITH NSW 2751

                             Website: www.uws.edu.au




                                                                                  2
Contents
University Contacts ...........................................................................................................2
Welcome and Introduction ................................................................................................5

SECTION ONE ..................................................................................................... 8
Preparing for Professional Experience .........................................................................9
     Introduction ..............................................................................................................9
     Professional Experience Prerequisites ....................................................................9
     Support Services for UWS Students........................................................................9

SECTION TWO.....................................................................................................11
Implementing Quality Supervision ................................................................................12
     Key Personnel..........................................................................................................12
     Roles and Responsibilities for Key Personnel .........................................................12

SECTION THREE .................................................................................................18
Administrative Responsibilities.....................................................................................19
    Enrolment.................................................................................................................19
    Placement of Pre-service Teachers.........................................................................19
    Attendance...............................................................................................................19
    Volunteering.............................................................................................................21
    Withdrawal from Professional Experience ...............................................................21

SECTION FOUR ...................................................................................................23
Pre-service Teacher Progress .......................................................................................24
     Maximising Pre-service Teacher success and minimising the
           likelihood of failure in Professional Experience ..............................................24
     Professional Experience Grades .............................................................................24
     Pre-service Teacher Report.....................................................................................25
     Pre-service Teacher Progress during Professional Experience ..............................26
     Progression across Professional Experience Units .................................................29

SECTION FIVE ..................................................................................................... 31
Professional, Ethical and Legal Responsibilities.........................................................32
     Ethics .......................................................................................................................32
     Child Protection........................................................................................................33
     Confidentiality ..........................................................................................................34
     Informed Consent ....................................................................................................34
     Conflict of Interest ....................................................................................................35
     Duty of Care.............................................................................................................35
     Physical Contact ......................................................................................................36
     Occupational Health &Safety and Risk Management ..............................................37
     Prohibited Professional Experience Placements .....................................................38
     Pre-service Teacher Insurance................................................................................38
     Pre-service Teacher Conduct ..................................................................................39
     School of Education Code of Ethics for Staff and Students.....................................40
     Professional Experience Complaint Handling and Resolution Policy ......................40
     Professional Experience Privacy Policy...................................................................40
     Inclusive Language ..................................................................................................41
     Anti Discrimination Legislation in Australia ..............................................................42




                                                                                                                                 3
SECTION SIX .......................................................................................................45
    Documentation and Appendices
    Sample Notification of Pre-service Teacher Requiring Additional Support Form
(RAS1)
     And Learning Plan 1 (LP 1)..……………………………………………………..…….. 46
    Sample Committee of Advice - Pre-service Teacher At Risk of Failing Professional
    Experience Form (AR1), Learning Plan 2 (LP 2) & Committee of Advice – Review of
    Pre-service Teacher At Risk of Failing Professional Experience Form (AR2) .........48
    School of Education Child Protection Protocol 2011 ...............................................51
    Principles of Ethical and Professional Behaviour Policy ..........................................52




                                                                                                                  4
Welcome
Dear Colleagues and Pre-service Teachers,

The quality of Teacher education programs at the University of Western Sydney
rests on the strength of partnerships with the profession and the communities of
Greater Western Sydney. Teachers in schools and other educational settings who
supervise the Pre-service Teachers from UWS are integral to our partnership with
the profession.

I thank Teachers for agreeing to supervise one or more of our Pre-service Teachers,
and Pre-service Teachers for their commitment and professionalism. I appreciate
the amount of work and effort they will dedicate to this task. In return, I hope that
the relationships between our Pre-service Teachers, Supervising Teachers, and
University Advisors are professionally rewarding.

Warm regards

Associate Professor Steve Wilson
Head, School of Education


                                Introduction
In a knowledge society, effective teacher education programs aim to prepare
teachers who:
     are skilled practitioners
     are knowledgeable about teaching and learning
     are reflective about their work and act ethically and wisely, based on their
       reflections
     undertake ongoing professional development
     research and improve their work
     are advocates for Teachers, students and for teaching and learning
     have the capacity to interact with other professionals and with the broader
       community in meaningful ways (based upon Ryan, 2002)

To facilitate the preparation of such teachers, at the University of Western Sydney
(UWS) Pre-service Teachers:
   are introduced in early childhood, family and community settings, schools and
      at the university to the theories and practices required of effective Teachers;
   develop, implement, reflect upon and refine their own personal theories of
      effective practice with the support of teachers, other staff, and university
      lecturers;
   research and reflect on their experiences, their actions, their own learning and
      that of the children and young people they teach;




                                                                                 5
   complete assignments in schools and at the university which are authentic to
         teaching and learning, and the roles of teachers.

                                 UWS Graduate Attributes

   The University of Western Sydney has developed a set of attributes that apply to all
   its students. The NSW Institute of Teachers’ Framework for Professional Teaching
             Standards can be found at http://www.nswteachers.nsw.edu.au/


A UWS graduate:
                                                         communicates effectively through reading,
                                     communication
                                                         listening, speaking and writing in diverse
                                      skills
                                                         contexts
                                                         applies appropriate numerical skills to
                                     numeracy
                                                         understand, interpret and solve problems
commands multiple skills and          social
literacies to enable adaptable                           is a self-reliant learner who works effectively in
                                      interaction
                                                         groups and teams
lifelong learning                     skills
                                                         accesses, evaluates and uses relevant
                                     information
                                                         information to solve problems and to continue
                                      literacy
                                                         learning
                                     technology         applies communication and other technologies
                                      literacy           effectively in personal and professional learning
                                     has in-depth knowledge in one or more chosen fields of study

                                     understands how this knowledge is connected with other fields
demonstrates                          and disciplines
comprehensive, coherent and
connected knowledge                   understands the local and international relevance of their chosen
                                      field(s) of study

                                     understands the values and principles of scholarly inquiry
                                     integrates theoretical and practical knowledge to analyse and
                                      solve complex and novel problems
applies knowledge through
intellectual inquiry in              applies critical, reflective, and creative skills to make informed
professional or applied               decisions in professional or applied contexts
contexts
                                     engages effectively in advancing knowledge both independently
                                      and collaboratively
                                     understands and values ethical conduct, intellectual integrity, and
                                      professionalism in work and civic life

brings knowledge to life
                                     engages responsibly in work and civic life with respect for diversity
through responsible                   and social justice principles
engagement and appreciation
of diversity in an evolving
                                     can initiate and contribute positively to sustainable change in a
world                                 diverse and evolving world




                                                                                                       6
Professional experience is an enriching growth experience when university lecturers
and teachers (to be referred to in this document as Supervising Teachers in
recognition of their role in the professional preparation of Pre-service Teachers) in
educational settings work collegially to provide the best possible professional
experience for Pre-service Teachers leading to their induction as new members of
the teaching profession. This partnership respects the needs and expertise of
teachers and university lecturers. In this partnership “each partner has something to
offer the joint enterprise (i.e. professional experience), which is different from but
complements that which is offered by the other partners” (Day, 1998, p.419).

During professional experience Supervising Teachers in schools and other
educational settings undertake the day-to-day professional development of Pre-
service Teachers. Supervising Teachers are supported in this role by University
Advisors who work with them and the Pre-service Teachers.

University Advisors working in professional experience settings act as mentors to
Pre-service Teachers, assisting them to fulfil university and school responsibilities
as well as realise their own personal goals for professional development. University
Advisors help Pre-service Teachers make sense of their experiences (to link theory
and evidence-based practice) and challenge them to think more deeply about
broader teaching and societal issues as well as the ethical and moral issues
embedded in teaching. University Advisors also act as professional colleagues to
Supervising Teachers as they undertake their important roles.

Welcome, as a Field or University Based Teacher Educator to the Professional
Experience Program. Thank you for your support of our Pre-service Teachers in
their professional development

Regards,
UWS Professional Experience Unit

References
Day, (1998). The role of higher education in fostering lifelong learning partnerships with Teachers.
European Journal of Education 33 (4), 419-432.

Ryan, M., (2002). Teaching and vocational learning. Unicorn. Journal of the Australian College of
Educators 28 (3), 29-33.




                                                                                                  7
SECTION ONE




    Preparing for Professional Experience
   Introduction
   Professional Experience Prerequisites
   Services for Pre-service Teachers




                                            8
Preparing for Professional Experience
                                   Introduction

Professional experience is of paramount importance to their development as the
next generation of teachers. Success for all participants (Pre-service Teachers,
Supervising Teachers, University Advisors, children and young people) is facilitated
if sound preparation occurs beforehand and a well-organised approach is
continuously maintained. Pre-service Teachers are reminded that professional
experience draws upon all reading and coursework- it is not an isolated experience.
professional experience can be physically and psychologically tiring. Pre-service
Teachers are reminded to make every effort to maintain their health and wellbeing
during this time by eating well, maintaining exercise and minimising demanding
social activities. The following section may help all participants have a rewarding
and fulfilling experience.

The professional experience dates are negotiated between schools for specified
dates. Pre-service Teachers must ensure their availability for these set dates when
enrolling. Only under exceptional circumstances and with the permission of the
Secondary Professional Experience Academic Coordinator and the agreement of
schools can these dates be varied.

                     Professional Experience Prerequisites

It is the Pre-service Teacher’s responsibility to ensure that they meet the
prerequisites for each professional experience unit they undertake. Details can be
found in the relevant Unit Handbook/Calendar of the year in which the Pre-service
Teacher first enrolled but will include having completed a UWS Child Protection
Workshop and submitted a Working With Children Check Declaration on enrolment.

                       Support Services for UWS Students

For further information look at the UWS website under “Information for
Current Students” and click on “Getting help”.

The following is a brief description of services that Pre-service Teachers might find
of benefit during their studies at the University of Western Sydney.

Counselling Service: Counselling is free and available on a strictly confidential
basis to all members of the UWS community – students, new graduates and staff.
Services include:

               Private and confidential counseling sessions
               Advocacy for academic, administrative, complaint and misconduct
                issues
               Study and life skills workshops
               Advice and information on mental health and illness
               Advice for mature age students



                                                                                 9
Disability Service: The Disability Service provides support and assistance to
prospective and current students with disabilities and chronic health conditions in all
types and levels of university courses. Under the Disability Amended Act 2009
students who identify to the university that they have a disability or chronic health
condition must be provided with reasonable educational adjustments. To register
with the Disability Service, phone 9852 5199 and make an appointment. For further
information please refer to website

http://www.uws.edu.au/currentstudents/current_students/getting_help/disability_service

Students are encouraged to disclose the need for reasonable effort to be made to
accommodate their special needs during their professional experience setting to
their Professional Experience Academic Co-ordinator in the first instance.

The Student Learning Unit: The Student Learning Unit (SLU) organises and runs
a variety of programs and courses to develop students' academic literacy,
mathematics and study skills, and participates in many collaborative projects with
schools and colleges to enhance the academic achievement of UWS students All
services offered by the SLU are free to UWS students and include:
    SLU Workshops
      Bridging Programs
      PASS – peer assisted study sessions
      Online Learning
      Collaboration with Schools and Colleges
Further information can be found at:
http://www.uws.edu.au/currentstudents/current_students/getting_help/study_and_life_skills_workshops


UWS Careers and Co-operative Education Unit: The UWS Careers and Co-
operative Education Unit aims to enhance the employability of UWS students whilst
establishing links with organisations, starting with those in Greater Western Sydney.
We offer a range of programs and services to equip students and recent graduates
with the skills to manage their own career development. These include careers
workshops and resources on Career Planning, Résumés, Job Applications, Job
Interviews and Work Experience. This unit can be contacted on (02) 4736 0371.

Chaplaincy: The Chaplains are available on all campuses and provide a service
for those who wish to find spiritual directions in life. Major areas include spiritual
wellbeing, general support for students, regular meetings and small group work.

Student Centre:

                             KINGSWOOD                Phone
                             Building K               1300 897669




                                                                                             10
SECTION TWO




       Implementing Quality Supervision
   Key Personnel
   Roles and Responsibilities for Key Personnel




                                               11
Implementing Quality Supervision

                                   Key Personnel

The key personnel involved in the professional development of future teachers (Pre-
service Teachers) are:

   School Professional Experience Coordinator – Each school has a nominated
    staff member who undertakes the role as the Professional Experience
    Coordinator. This coordinator is employed by the university as a casual UWS
    staff member to liaise between Pre-service Teachers, school staff and the
    university.

   Supervising Teacher - the field based teacher, employed by the university as a
    casual staff member to supervise the Pre-service Teacher in a school.

   Pre-service Teacher – the university student.

   University Advisor – a full-time, part-time or casual employee of the university,
    employed to provide a link between the university and the school.

   Children and young people – the school child/student.


    Roles and Responsibilities of Key Personnel in Professional Experience


            SCHOOL PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE COORDINATOR

Before the Professional Experience
 Allocate Pre-service Teachers to accredited, competent Supervising Teachers
 Distribute documentation to Supervising Teachers and assist Supervising
   Teachers in interpreting the materials
 Notify (if applicable) Supervising Teachers of pre-professional experience
   briefing meeting session date/time and encourage their attendance
 Attend pre-professional experience briefing meeting (if conducted)
 Become familiar with and understand the philosophies, practices and
   expectations of the professional experience
 Respond to Supervising Teachers’ enquiries
 Refer concerns/enquiries to University Advisor if necessary
 Notify university of changed circumstances which affect Pre-service Teachers
 Confirm the names of Supervising Teachers with the Professional Experience
   Office in order to process pay claims and letters of appreciation




                                                                                 12
During the Professional Experience
 During week 1, be responsible for collecting Pre-service Teacher’s class
  timetables for University Advisors
 Be responsible for organising meeting space with University Advisors and Pre-
  service Teachers
 Be responsible for the implementation of the professional experiences in the
  school
 Support Supervising Teachers and Pre-service Teachers in establishing positive
  working relationships
 Assist Pre-service Teachers in their orientation to the school including making
  available documents referring to policies and procedures
 Encourage Pre-service Teachers’ professional growth and contribution at a
  school level
 Monitor Pre-service Teachers’/ Supervising Teachers day-to-day attitudes and
  activities
 Monitor Pre-service Teacher’s attendance and progress
 Document and refer concerns about Pre-service Teachers to University Advisor
 Provide advice/assistance to Pre-service Teachers and Supervising Teachers
 Be a member of the Committee of Advice where established




After the Professional Experience
 Check Pre-service Teacher’s final reports in consultation with Supervising
   Teachers and University Advisor
 Ensure that all original final reports and attendance registers are returned to the
   university
 Submit Teacher payment claims to the university
 Submit payment claim as a coordinator when 3 or more students are placed in
   the school


                            SUPERVISING TEACHERS

Before the Professional Experience

   Attend pre-professional experience briefing meeting if conducted
   Become familiar with and understand the philosophies, practices and
    expectations of the professional experience in order to help the Pre-service
    Teacher make the connection between “theory” and “evidence-based practice”
   Prepare work area for the Pre-service Teacher
   Prepare the class or group for the arrival of the Pre-service Teacher
   Plan for a regular time to give daily feedback to the Pre-service Teacher
   Ensure that you have received and read all materials from the university by the
    beginning of the block professional experience




                                                                                 13
During the Professional Experience

   Become knowledgeable about the Pre-service Teachers, their special areas of
    university study, prior teaching experiences, personal interests, extracurricular
    strengths, areas of concerns, personal goals for professional experience, and
    preferred style of supervision
   Clarify your own expectations and those of the school to the Pre-service Teacher
   Assist Pre-service Teacher/s with planning and preparation
   Assist Pre-service Teacher/s with investigations of the school and other
    university requirements
   Monitor Pre-service Teacher/s in classroom and school in all interactions with
    children, young people, other staff, parents and community members. Ensure
    that Pre-service Teachers do not to take responsibility for children/young
    people alone.
   Provide ongoing oral feedback on their professional performance in the school
   Provide written feedback at least once per day
   Discuss written feedback with Pre-service Teacher/s and return this feedback to
    the Pre-service Teacher/s each day
   Model appropriate teaching and learning techniques and strategies
   Encourage the Pre-service Teacher/s to show initiative while implementing a
    range of teaching and learning techniques and strategies in a variety of
    developmental, content and curriculum areas
   Notify University Advisor of any concerns
   Consult with University Advisor regularly and at meetings where appropriate
   Convene Committee of Advice where established
   Communicate to Pre-service Teacher/s about their progress and provide oral
    and written feedback drawing attention to areas of strength and weakness
   Provide Pre-service Teacher/s with specific strategies (in writing and verbally) for
    developing areas in need of improvement
   Support Pre-service Teacher/s critical reflection on their teaching practice and
    professional standing
   In consultation with others and in accordance with procedures set out in the unit
    handbook, determine whether the Pre-service Teacher has made satisfactory
    progress
   Complete final report, allocate a grade and discuss report with the Pre-service
    Teacher before the final day of block.

    After the Professional Experience

   Provide original of the final report and any other relevant documentation
    including attendance registers to the Student Teacher who is responsible to
    deliver all documentation to the Professional Experience Unit. Details on how
    the Supervising Teachers may claim payment is advised on the pay claim which
    is supplied on the CD.




                                                                                   14
UNIVERSITY ADVISOR

Before the Professional Experience
 Become familiar with and understand the philosophies, practices and
   expectations of the professional experience
 Attend pre-professional experience briefing meeting if conducted
 Make contact with the school and provide the Supervising Teacher and the
   school professional experience coordinator with your contact details
 Ensure all documentation is received by schools
 Complete all employment documentation before commencing work (eg Casual
   Employment Authority)

During the Professional Experience
 In the first week, confirm that the Pre-service Teacher has been attending
 Visit school as required by the Unit Coordinator and according to the needs of
  the Pre-service Teachers
 Provide Supervising Teachers, School Coordinators and Pre-service Teachers
  with a contact number or email address
 Sign the Pre-service Teacher’s attendance register for each visit
 Meet with Supervising Teachers and Pre-service Teachers (where possible) on
  each visit
 Monitor Pre-service Teacher progress and attendance in consultation with
  Supervising Teacher and school professional experience coordinator
 Review Pre-service Teacher documentation as appropriate
 Give Pre-service Teachers feedback on their professional progress, in relation to
  the outcomes of the Unit on each visit
 Assist Pre-service Teachers to fulfil university and school responsibilities as well
  as realise their own personal goals for professional development
 Assist Pre-service Teachers in making sense of their experiences (to link theory
  and evidence-based practice)
 Challenge Pre-service Teachers to think more deeply about broader teaching
  and societal issues as well as the ethical and moral dilemmas embedded in
  teaching
 Participate, if required, in the Committee of Advice
 Maintain phone contact with schools as required
 Check Pre-service Teacher final report in the last week of the block




After the Professional Experience
 Return any necessary documentation to the Professional Experience Unit




                             PRE-SERVICE TEACHER

Before the Professional Experience
  Know placement –school, class/group, Teacher etc
 Confirm placement with Professional Experience Office if not advised by the
   university one week prior to the commencement of your first visit



                                                                                 15
   Become familiar with and understand the philosophies, practices and
    expectations of the professional experience
   Attend pre-professional experience briefing meeting and/or Professional
    Experience unit program as applicable
   Ensure that a Working With Children Check Declaration has been completed at
    enrolment to the university
   Complete a School of Education (UWS) Child Protection training workshop
   Attend all In School visits as scheduled
   Be familiar with the professional and ethical codes of conduct expected of
    Teachers
   Prepare documentation for professional experience
   Develop an understanding of the school, family and community
   Ensure that the Supervising Teacher has taken delivery of a school package

During the Professional Experience
 Be familiar with school philosophies, policies, procedures, resources and
  equipment
 Regularly check vUWS and Student Email Account for urgent messages
 Be familiar and comply with relevant UWS policies, particularly academic and
  non-academic conduct policies
 Complete all required school-based activities and documentation
 Attend all required days
 Arrive each day at least 30 minutes before the commencement of the teaching
  day
 Sign the attendance register prior to commencing work and again at the end of
  each day and ensure that the Supervising Teacher co-signs register
 In case of illness or unavoidable absences contact the school, Professional
  Experience Office and University Advisor immediately to advise that you will be
  absent. Submit a medical certificate to the Professional Experience Office and
  retain a copy for yourself
 Make up any absence from professional experience as per Attendance Policy in
  this document
 Maintain and/or develop ethical and professional knowledge, skills, attitudes and
  conduct at school
 Display a responsible, professional attitude towards teaching and being a
  Teacher
 Develop an awareness of the major agencies and institutions that offer support
  to Teachers and families
 Interact with members of the school community in such a way so as to maximise
  opportunities for personal growth as a Teacher
 Negotiate, discuss and plan learning experiences with the Supervising Teacher
  and document independently prior to implementation.
 Have documented planning approved by Supervising Teacher prior to
  implementation
 Identify and provide for individual differences amongst children and young
  people
 Complete and have available daily all relevant documentation (including lesson
  plans)




                                                                               16
   Ensure Supervising Teacher has viewed all lesson plans at least 24 working
    hours before lesson delivery
   Develop and refine a variety of teaching skills and strategies for the achievement
    of desired learning outcomes
   Teach lessons or engage in experiences as stipulated in the relevant Unit
    Handbook
   Evaluate all teaching sessions and complete required self-evaluations and
    reflections
   Attend negotiated feedback sessions with Supervising Teacher before/after class
    time as necessary
   Notify concerns to Supervising Teacher, school professional experience
    coordinator, University Advisor, UWS professional experience academic co-
    ordinator as necessary
   Attend and participate in Committee of Advice if established
   Sight and sign final report before it is submitted to the university

After the Professional Experience
 Submit all required documentation to the university if required by the unit
   handbook, within one week of completion of the block
 Make an appointment immediately with the professional experience academic
   co-ordinator IF you failed the practicum, in order to develop a Progress Plan
 Collect original report from University Professional Experience Unit once it has
   been processed which should be immediately if all documentation is correct.




                                                                                 17
SECTION THREE


        Administrative Responsibilities
   Enrolment
   Placement of Pre-service Teachers
   Attendance
   Volunteering
   Withdrawal from Professional Experience




                                              18
Administrative Responsibilities

                                      Enrolment

All Pre-service Teachers must have confirmed enrolment in the appropriate unit
before the commencement of their professional experience. Enrolment will not be
confirmed until a Working with Children Check Declaration has been signed and
submitted to student services. Failure to correctly enrol will result in the professional
experience placement being cancelled.

Pre-service Teachers need to ensure they have completed all prerequisites before
enrolling in any professional experience unit. In this way they would follow the
recommended patterns in the professional experience program. All Pre-service
Teachers must complete mandatory Child Protection training as outlined in the
School of Education Child Protection Protocol before their professional experience
placement commences.

                        Placement of Pre-service Teachers

Enrolled Pre-service Teachers are usually placed by administrative and academic
staff at schools that have agreed to take Pre-service Teachers when surveyed
through the UWS School of Education Professional Experiences Office. Pre-service
Teachers should not approach schools for placements.

Although the UWS School of Education Professional Experiences Unit makes every
effort to match Pre-service Teachers with schools that are in their desired location,
often there are not enough schools offering to take Pre-service Teachers in a
particular area. Pre-service Teachers may need to make special transport, work or
child care arrangements to attend the professional experience. If a Pre-service
Teacher requires special consideration concerning placement for professional
experience, they are required to advise the Professional Experience Academic
Coordinator at the beginning of semester and before placements have been
allocated. Pre-service Teachers may be required to submit documentation to
support their application for special consideration eg Doctor’s certificate. If special
consideration is granted, reasonable effort to accommodate Pre-service Teacher’s
requirements will be made in line with university policy and the availability of a
suitable setting.

                                      Attendance

Pre-service Teachers are expected to:
 attend every day during the professional experience placement (including all
   visits)

   ensure that they are punctual to schools




                                                                                    19
   present at school throughout the normal operating hours and both prior to and
    after normal hours according to the normal staff practice

   remain at the school throughout the day.

   obtain the permission of the principal if they need to be away from the school at
    any time.

During the professional experience Pre-service Teachers are expected to participate
in all the normal duties of a Teacher including working a full day. Pre-service
Teachers should participate under the direct supervision of their Supervising
Teacher in all routines including playground duty, bus duty, sport activities, staff
meetings, parent meetings etc. It is desirable, where possible, that Pre-service
Teachers are accommodated in normal staffrooms.

Attendance Register

Each Pre-service Teacher is required by the university to sign an Attendance
Register each day. An Attendance Register will be provided by the University. The
Supervising Teacher should co-sign this form. Pre-service Teacher’s require these
attendance registers when registering with the NSW Institute of Teachers to verify
number of professional experience days and to be awarded a final grade by UWS.

The University Advisor should also sign the Pre-service Teacher’s attendance
register when they are present in the school.

Attendance during industrial disputes

Pre-service Teachers are advised to investigate all perspectives related to disputes
to deepen their critical understandings of the professional, industrial, ethical and
legal responsibilities of Teachers. This may include attending meetings, reviewing
publications and engaging in discussions. Pre-service Teachers should not attend a
school on the days in which Teachers are engaged in strike action. Pre-service
Teachers are generally expected to make up missed teaching time, although
alternate activities related to these disputes may be considered in lieu of missed
days. Pre-service Teachers should contact the Professional Experience Academic
Coordinator for further details.

Absences

In the case of unavoidable absences the following procedure is to be carried out by
the Pre-service Teacher:
    Notify the Professional Experience Unit and school of the reason and
       probable duration of the absence. The Professional Experience Unit will
       notify the University Advisor if required.

       Submit relevant documentation (eg medical certificate) to the Professional
        Experience Unit by the end of the block.




                                                                                 20
    Retain a copy of the documentation for your records.

In courses where Pre-service Teachers are required to complete visits, the
requirements for these visits must be completed prior to the commencement of the
block professional experience period. Failure to comply with these requirements
may result in the award of an unsatisfactory grade (U grade).

In the event of absences occurring in excess of three days the Pre-service Teacher
may be deemed not to have completed the professional experience and an
unsatisfactory grade may be awarded. Pre-service Teachers will only be allowed to
resume the block in exceptional circumstances and with the permission of the
relevant Professional Experience Academic Coordinator.

All absences will need to be made up within seven "teaching days" of the
completion of the block professional experience period. If this is not possible, the
Pre-service Teacher is to negotiate the dates with the Professional Experience
Academic Coordinator.

                                    Volunteering

Pre-service Teachers and schools can benefit if Pre-service Teachers volunteer to
spend more than their allocated days in a school. Pre-service Teachers undertaking
volunteer work that is not required by their course/unit will still be covered by UWS
student insurance cover provided that the activity is approved and is related to the
Pre-service Teacher’s course of study. Approval for this must be in writing from the
Head of Program. Pre-service Teachers must undertake the same processes of
registering as a volunteer in the setting as any other volunteer would. Pre-service
Teachers are not permitted to attend overnight camps (see page 39).

                    Withdrawal from Professional Experience

Pre-service Teachers may choose to, or be advised to, withdraw from Professional
Experience for medical reasons or exceptional circumstances. Applications for
withdrawal without penalty must be supported by a medical certificate or letter from
a UWS Counsellor. Pre-service Teachers must apply for withdrawal through Student
Central, in writing.

Pre-service Teachers who choose to withdraw from a school after the
commencement of a placement for undocumented reasons will be awarded an
unsatisfactory grade unless the relevant Professional Experience Academic Co-
ordinator has approved the allocation of an alternative grade.

If a Pre-service Teacher withdraws from a Professional Experience unit and/or
school after placement has been made she or he MUST advise IN WRITING (via
Student Email Account is preferred) immediately the:

      Professional Experience Unit;

      Professional Experience Academic Coordinator;



                                                                                  21
   School Professional Experience Coordinator; and,

      Student Central


Pre-service Teachers will not be permitted to undertake the professional experience
again until it is next offered.




                                                                               22
SECTION FOUR


         Pre-service Teacher Progress
   Maximising Pre-service Teacher Success and
    Minimising the Likelihood of Failure in
    Professional Experience
   Professional Experience Grades
   Pre-service Teacher Report
   Pre-service Teacher Progress during
    Professional Experience
   Progression across Professional Experience
    Units




                                             23
Pre-service Teacher Progress
Maximising Pre-service Teacher success and minimising likelihood of failure
                        in professional experience

Learning to be a Teacher is a complex, personal and, at times, difficult matter that
involves transformation from “student of teaching” to “Teacher of students” (Ganser,
2002). During this time Pre-service Teachers are expected to try out (with relatively
unfamiliar children, classes and environment) their own beliefs about learning and
teaching, and the knowledge and pedagogy (practices) they have learnt at
university. As they try out their beliefs and developing knowledge and pedagogies,
they may make some mistakes. This situation is to be expected. It is through the
observation of teachers and classes; trialling their ideas and pedagogies; reflecting
on the success or otherwise of these ‘trials’; and, re-trialling on the basis of their
reflections and feedback from Supervising Teachers that Pre-service Teachers
develop their own professional pedagogical knowledge and practice, and become
Beginning Teachers.

However, if Pre-service Teachers experience serious or ongoing difficulties
then the processes outlined in this section need to be applied.

Initially, Supervising Teachers can take the following steps to maximise Pre-service
Teacher success and minimise the possibility of failure:

   prepare the class, positively, for the arrival of the Pre-service Teacher;
   get to know the Pre-service Teacher as well as possible – how they approach a
    challenge, how they react to constructive criticism, how they react to change;
   take into account the Pre-service Teacher’s background and previous
    experiences;
   have regular meetings with the Pre-service Teacher and encourage them to
    share any difficulties they may be experiencing;
   encourage the Pre-service Teacher to have informal contact with other members
    of staff;
   use active listening skills;
   try to deal with any difficulties early and at a low level before they become
    serious, do not presume that the problem will be resolved without direction;
   follow university guidelines carefully with a Pre-service Teacher whose progress
    is “causing concern”.
                                             (based upon Brookes & Sikes, 1997, p.114).


                         Professional Experience Grades

A Satisfactory grade will result in the Pre-service Teacher passing the professional
experience and an Unsatisfactory grade in professional experience will result in the
Pre-service Teacher failing the professional experience unit.




                                                                                  24
When Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grades are used, the following criteria apply:

S – Satisfactory
This grade is awarded to any Pre-service Teacher who is considered by the
Supervising Teacher to have demonstrated a satisfactory level of competence
according to the criteria of the particular Professional Experience unit.
Where a Pre-service Teacher’s work is considered outstanding or well above
average, this judgement should be reflected in the written comments in the final
report.

U – Unsatisfactory
No Pre-service Teacher should receive an Unsatisfactory grade without being
placed At Risk and the Committee of Advice being convened. This grade may
be recommended on the final report on ONE or more of the following grounds:
    Performance Deficiencies – i.e. failure to exhibit criteria indicated for the
      particular Professional Experience unit
    Withdrawing from Professional Experience – unless a Withdrawal Without
      Penalty is awarded.
    Non-Academic Misconduct


                           Pre-service Teacher Report

Each unit has a specific Pre-service Teacher report. Reference should be made to
the individual program’s specific handbook. In general, the report should be written
towards the end of the final week of the block professional experience. The final
report is based on a summation of the daily written feedback that has been
previously discussed and given to the Pre-service Teacher. The final report is the
responsibility of the Supervising Teacher. The Pre-service Teacher must be given
the opportunity to read and discuss the final report with the Supervising Teacher.
There should be no surprises for the Pre-service Teacher in what is written.

The original report and attendance register should be mailed by the School
Professional Experience Coordinator to the Professional Experience Office no later
than the week following the conclusion of the professional experience.


PRE-SERVICE TEACHER’S FINAL GRADES FOR PROFESSIONAL
EXPERIENCE UNITS ARE NOT RECOMMENDED UNTIL ORIGINAL REPORTS
AND ATTENDANCE REGISTERS ARE SUBMITTED TO THE PROFESSIONAL
EXPERIENCE OFFICE.

LATE RECEIPT OF ORIGINAL REPORTS AND ATTENDANCE REGISTERS
MAY LEAD TO PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS NOT RECEIVING A GRADE FOR
THEIR PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE UNIT AND COULD RESULT IN THE PRE-
SERVICE TEACHER NOT GRADUATING.

Pre-service Teachers must collect the original report from the Professional
Experience Office two weeks after completing their professional experience.



                                                                                   25
Pre-service Teacher Progress During Professional Experience

In most cases Pre-service Teachers will make satisfactory progress towards
meeting the professional experience outcomes. In cases where Pre-service
Teachers are not making satisfactory progress the procedures for Pre-service
Teachers whose progress is “causing concern” should be followed.

Pre-service Teachers Achieving Satisfactory Progress
When Pre-service Teachers are making satisfactory progress the Supervising
Teacher should:
     follow the roles and responsibilities of key personnel in Section 2 of this book
      and the relevant Professional Experience Handbook
     provide daily written and verbal feedback as detailed in the Unit Handbook
     identify progress towards meeting the professional experience outcomes

Pre-service Teachers Whose Progress is Causing Concern
Pre-service Teachers may experience difficulties in meeting the requirements of the
professional experience for a variety of reasons. These reasons include:

   Professionalism – attendance, punctuality, preparation of plans and resources;
    teaching including poor communication processes; behaviour management;
    ability to accept and/or act upon advice and instruction; appropriate verbal or
    physical interactions with children or young people, families and staff; teamwork
    and all other aspects of professional standards and professional ethics.
   Personal attributes – initiative, reflective practice, empathy, warmth, enthusiasm,
    commitment.
   Unit (subject) and teaching requirements and standards as documented in unit
    requirements and assessments for the relevant program and level of course.


The Supervising Teacher, University Advisor, School Professional Experience
Coordinator, or the Pre-service Teacher can identify a Pre-service Teacher as
‘causing concern’. This identification may be made during visits or during the block
professional experience (generally in the first week). Early identification of any
concerns ensures that the Pre-service Teacher receives appropriate support. It is
essential that Supervising Teachers identify concerns on the written feedback they
provide. Should a number of concerns be identified and/or the Pre-service Teacher
does not respond to feedback the Pre-service Teacher must be identified as
“Requiring Additional Support (RAS)” and the procedures outlined below must be
followed.

Pre-service Teachers Requiring Additional Support (RAS)
Pre-service Teachers who are not making satisfactory progress must be identified
as Requiring Additional Support. This identification should be made by the end of
the first week of the block practicum to allow time for Pre-service Teachers to act on
advice. The following procedures should be followed:




                                                                                  26
The Supervising Teacher *

      Documents concerns on the form RAS1 (Meeting 1)
      Outlines goals and strategies and a date for achievement (generally 2-3 days
       later)
      Discusses the strategies needed to rectify the situation with the Pre-service
       Teacher (Learning Plan 1)
      Provides a copy for the Pre-service Teacher and fax a copy to the
       Professional Experience Office immediately, so that the University Advisor
       can be informed
      Monitors the Pre-service Teacher’s progress providing daily written feedback
       (the University Advisor should stay in telephone contact during this time)
      Reassesses the Pre-service Teacher’s progress on the agreed upon date
       (Meeting 2)
      Uses the form RAS1 to document the outcome of this meeting. The form
       must clearly state whether the Pre-service Teacher has met the set goals and
       whether the Pre-service Teacher is now making satisfactory progress.
       Where the goals have not been met, or where new concerns have been
       identified the Pre-service Teacher must be notified that they are “At Risk of
       Failing the Professional Experience” and the procedures set out below
       must be followed,
      A copy is given to the Pre-service Teacher and a copy faxed to the
       Professional Experience Office.

* The University Advisor can also initiate the RAS processed in consultation with the
Supervising Teacher.


Pre-service Teachers At Risk of Failing in the Professional Experience
Pre-service Teachers must be notified that they are “At Risk of Failing the
Professional Experience” when they:
    have been placed at RAS and have not made satisfactory progress
    have met the set goals during RAS but new concerns have arisen
    have reached the halfway point of the professional experience and are at risk
      of not meeting one or more of the professional experience outcomes

In most cases Pre-service Teachers will be identified as RAS before being
notified that they are “At Risk of Failing Professional Experience”, however, if
concerns arise at the half way point or later Pre-service Teachers may be
placed “At Risk of Failing Professional Experience” without first going
through RAS.

Procedures for Pre-service Teachers At Risk of Failing Professional
Experience
    Identify the Pre-service Teacher At Risk
    Arrange for a meeting between the Pre-service Teacher, the Supervising
      Teacher and the University Advisor (Meeting 3)




                                                                                27
   Document the reasons for the Pre-service Teacher being At Risk, goals,
       strategies and timelines on the At Risk Form (AR1)
      Discuss specific strategies needed to remediate the situation with the Pre-
       service Teacher (Learning Plan 2)
      Give a copy to the Pre-service Teacher and fax to the Professional
       Experience Office (fax number provided on form)
      Monitor progress
      Provide daily written feedback
      Assess progress at a meeting (Meeting 4) involving the University Advisor,
       Pre-service Teacher, Supervising Teacher and if possible the school
       professional experience coordinator.
      Ensure all participants have the opportunity to state their views on the Pre-
       service Teacher’s progress
      Document the outcome of this meeting using the form At Risk 2 (AR2)

The Pre-service Teacher may not ‘defer’ or ‘withdraw without penalty’ once they
have been notified At Risk. The expectation is that the Pre-service Teacher will
continue at the placement until the period of the professional experience is complete
or terminated by the professional experience academic coordinator. Pre-service
Teachers who do not participate in the process will be deemed to have failed to
meet requirements by the end of the period of professional experience (other than in
cases of documented serious illness or misadventure). Pre-service Teachers are
expected to attend EVERY DAY following identification of “At Risk of Failing the
Professional Experience”. Additional placements will not be provided during the
period of enrolment in the Professional Experience unless the initial placement is
deemed “professionally unsuitable” for reasons not related to Pre-service Teacher
poor performance.

Outcome of the At Risk Process

Allocation of a Grade

At the completion of the full period of the professional experience a final result must
be recommended for the professional experience. Pre-service Teachers who have
made satisfactory progress and exhibit a satisfactory standard of performance at this
point may be so designated on the relevant final report form. Pre-service Teachers
who have failed to meet requirements at this point must be designated on the relevant
final report form as UNSATISFACTORY. This result must be supported by the At
Risk documentation. The University Advisor and Supervising Teacher will consult with
regard to the final grade. In the event of agreement not being reached, the final
decision is the responsibility of the university.

Only in documented exceptional circumstances and at the discretion of the Head,
School of Education, a Pre-service Teacher may be permitted to undertake up to 5
extra professional experience block days if it is considered by the University Advisor
and the professional experience academic coordinator that the Pre-service Teacher
is expected to achieve a satisfactory professional experience result in this time.




                                                                                  28
Pre-service Teachers who receive an UNSATISFACTORY grade may re-enrol in
the professional experience unit only when the unit is next on offer. Their academic
transcript will record an “UNSATISFACTORY” grade, which is a fail grade.

      Level 1                       Level 2                         Level 3
 Satisfactory (No)
     Progress
                             Requiring                            At Risk
                                                            Committee of Advice
                            Additional                          Meeting 3- AR1
        (Yes)
                           Support RAS1                    Attended by Supervising
                                 Meeting 1.                 Teacher, Pre-service
  Regular Advisory        Attended by Supervising          Teacher, the additional
     Sessions           Teacher, Pre-service Teacher,      member (if possible) and
                          an additional member (if         University Advisor. AR1
                           possible school PE co-             and LP2 completed
                          ordinator) RAS1 and LP1
                              forms completed                  Meeting 4 – AR2
                                                           Attended by Supervising
Satisfactory Progress              Meeting 2                Teacher, Pre-service
                        Outcome ticked on RAS1             Teacher, the additional
                             Meeting attended by           member (if possible) and
                          Supervising Teacher, Pre-           University Advisor.
                           service Teacher and the
                         additional member if possible     If satisfactory, S Grade
 S Grade awarded                                                  awarded. If
                        If satisfactory after meeting 2,   unsatisfactory, U Grade
                                return to Level 1                   awarded
                         If unsatisfactory, Pre-service
                        Teacher notified “At Risk”, go
                                   to Level 3

                Progression Across Professional Experience Units

The procedures under this section apply to situations where a Pre-service Teacher’s
professional experience placement has been terminated before completion, where
the Pre-service Teacher has recorded a serious fail in a professional experience
placement that has resulted in the good name of the university being prejudiced or
where a Pre-service Teacher has failed consecutive placements.

Where Pre-service Teachers are experiencing difficulties with their professional
experience, the College of Arts level policies that have At Risk processes exist to
intervene and to provide support and direction with a view to enhancing the
prospects of a successful placement. When a Pre-service Teacher fails a
professional experience placement the normal UWS progression and graduation
rules generally apply.

In a very small number of cases there may be:
    A serious fail that has resulted in the good name of the university being
      prejudiced; or



                                                                                 29
 A recommendation from the At Risk Committee of Advice or directly from the
      hosting school that the Pre-service Teacher be withdrawn prior to the
      completion of the placement. In such cases the professional experience
      academic coordinator may terminate the placement at this stage;
     A Pre-service Teacher who fails two consecutive professional experience
      placements.

In any of these circumstances, a process of review and remediation is activated and
must be completed before the Pre-service Teacher is able to undertake a further
professional experience unit.

The Head, School of Education will review the reports from the school concerned
and/or the Committee of Advice 1 and the final assessments in the case of
consecutive failures and will request the Pre-service Teacher to attend an interview.
Also attending the interview will be the relevant professional experience academic
coordinator and another designated staff member of the university if considered
desirable by the Head of School. The advice to the Pre-service Teacher will include
a summary statement of the reasons for the review and remediation, including any
relevant documentation and information about the UWS staff who will be attending.

The advice will also indicate that the purpose of the meeting is fundamentally to
examine what remedial action might be appropriate to enable the student to
undertake another successful placement in the future.

The Pre-service Teacher will be invited to bring with them a support person, being a
fellow student, a student association welfare officer, or a UWS counsellor from the
Student Support Services or other member of staff of the university.

At the meeting the Head of School will outline to the Pre-service Teacher the extent
and nature of the concerns associated with the professional experience and invite
the student to respond to and comment on the issues raised. The Head of School
will discuss with the student a range of personal and/or professional development
activities and options that might be desirable. As far as possible the meeting shall
be conducted in a manner that tries to achieve consensus on a program of
development that will give the Pre-service Teacher the best possible opportunity to
complete successfully a Professional Experience unit in the future.

Following the meeting the Head of School will write to the Pre-service Teacher
formally advising of any requirements that the Pre-service Teacher must undertake
prior to being allowed to enrol in any further professional experience unit. That letter
will stipulate the nature of any remedial action required, advise on the arrangements
to be made, the time frame involved for the remediation program (up to a maximum
limit of one year) and the nature of any reporting requirements.

References
Brookes, V., & Sikes, P. (1997). The Good Mentor Guide. Buckingham: Open University Press.


1
  In circumstances where the placement is terminated before completion, the Committee of Advice will proceed with the
submission of a grade for the final assessment which, in these cases would be U - Unsatisfactory




                                                                                                                 30
Ganser, T. (2002). How Teachers compare the roles for cooperating Teacher and mentor [Electronic
     Version]. The Educational Forum 66 (4), 380-386.




                                                                                           31
SECTION FIVE
        Professional, Ethical and Legal
               Responsibilities
   Ethics
   Child Protection
   Confidentiality
   Informed Consent
   Conflict of Interest
   Duty of Care
   Physical Contact
   Occupational Health & Safety and Risk
    Management
   Prohibited Professional Experience Placements
   Pre-service Teacher Insurance
   Pre-service Teacher Conduct
   School of Education Code of Ethics
   Professional Experience Complaint Handling
    and Resolution Policy
   Professional Experience Privacy Policy
   Inclusive Language
   Anti Discrimination Legislation in Australia



                                              32
Professional, Ethical and Legal
                      Responsibilities

In many cases the protocols in this section are based on UWS policies which can be
found on the UWS website at www.uws.edu.au. The information is current at the
time of writing, but policies are regularly updated by the University and it is the Pre-
service Teacher’s responsibility to ensure that they are acting in accordance with
the most up to date policy.


                                         Ethics

Professional ethics is concerned with knowing, and doing, what is good, right and
creates benefit according to what well-respected members of a particular profession
would think. Guidelines for ethical action are available to Teachers in the form of
value statements for the profession, or an employing body, and relevant codes of
ethics and conduct as outlined to Pre-service Teachers at UWS specifically for each
program.

UWS Pre-service Teachers are expected to behave professionally and ethically at
all times in accordance with all rules, policies and guidelines of UWS, School of
Education and the values and philosophies of their specific programs. The UWS
Code of Conduct should be used as a guide. Ethical communication and behaviour
is expected in relation to university staff, all early childhood setting/school staff, and
the families, children and young people with whom they come into contact
throughout their professional experience associations. Conversations with parents
should be polite and friendly, but the Pre-service Teacher must not assume the role
of the Teacher, in the giving of advice, or entering into dialogue about confidential
matters. Discretion and confidentiality must always be maintained.

Supervising Teachers have a professional and ethical responsibility to the teaching
profession to nurture the next generation of Teachers. Whilst Pre-service Teachers
can benefit from many learning experiences and reflection about them, Supervising
Teachers must not leave Pre-service Teachers alone with children or young people
or expect them to assume the role of the Teacher, unsupervised, at any time.

In the event that a Supervising Teacher (or School Professional Experience
Coordinator) has significant concerns that a Pre-service Teacher’s actions are in
breach of professional or ethical standards he or she should contact the school’s
principal, the University Advisor or the professional experience academic
coordinator (see front page of this handbook for contact details), follow mandatory
reporting procedures and notify the relevant authorities as per mandatory reporting
requirements if required.




                                                                                     33
In the event that a Pre-service Teacher has significant concerns that he/she has
been required to work in an illegal or unethical manner, or has witnessed illegal or
unethical practice, he/she should follow mandatory reporting procedures and/or
contact the school principal, his/her University Advisor, or the Professional
Experience Academic Coordinator who will advise as to appropriate actions.


                                  Child Protection
The School of Education has developed a Child Protection Protocol for all Pre-
service Teachers, as well as casual and permanent staff. This protocol includes the
signing of a Working With Children Check Declaration and includes a child
protection training session. All participants in professional experience must act in
accordance with the protocol (see Appendices), and follow mandatory reporting
procedures as detailed below. Pre-service Teachers who do not complete UWS
Child Protection training will not be permitted to undertake professional
experience.

Mandatory Reporting

Pre-service Teachers are deemed to be employed while on professional placement
and as such are deemed mandatory reporters in matters of child protection under
the Children and Young Persons (Care and Protection) Act 1998.

Under this legislation, Pre-service Teachers should follow the reporting procedures
as outlined in their child protection training. These will differ according to the
placement context. In NSW Department of Education and Training (DET) schools
DET procedures should be followed. In other settings, Pre-service Teachers should
familiarise themselves with the agency’s child protection procedures and follow
these or notify the DOCS Helpline (13 2111).

Support During a Reporting Process

Reporting can be a stressful experience for Pre-service Teachers. They are
reminded to refer back to their Child Protection Workshop materials for guidance.
While Pre-service Teachers are not obliged to advise UWS of a report, if there are
reasonable grounds for suspecting risk of harm to children including physical or
sexual abuse or neglect, or psychological harm or domestic violence, and Pre-
service Teachers are worried about the implications of making the report, or are
pressured not to report, they are encouraged to seek the support of their
professional experience academic co-ordinator or a respected professional mentor.

Allegations Against a Pre-service Teacher

Where a Pre-service Teacher is considered to pose a risk of harm to, or is alleged to
have harmed a child or children while on professional experience placement,
Supervising Teachers have an obligation to report their concerns. Reporting can be
directly to the DOCS Helpline (13 2111) or according to school/centre policies,
through a process of the report firstly going to the supervisor or principal.




                                                                                34
Process:

      Report the concern to the appropriate person/agency
      Arrange for the Pre-service Teacher to be removed from contact with
       children while the investigation takes place
      Notify the UWS Professional Experience Office. Staff will notify the relevant
       professional experience academic coordinator
      The Professional Experience Academic Coordinator will contact the Pre-
       service Teacher


The NSW Ombudsman has the responsibility to ensure that effective systems are in
place and to monitor local investigations within all government, and certain non-
government agencies in NSW for preventing and responding to reportable
allegations. This responsibility is outlined in Ombudsman Act 1974 and Child
Protection Legislation Amendment Act 2003 and explained further in Child
Protection in the Workplace. Responding to allegations against employees (June
2004). Under this legislation, schools are referred to as “agencies” and Pre-service
Teachers are deemed to be “employees” as they are engaged to provide services to
children and young people. Heads of agencies must notify the Ombudsman of
reportable allegations. A local investigation may be required. Joint agency/UWS
involvement in a local investigation is encouraged in cases where allegations are
raised against UWS Pre-service Teachers. UWS will provide support for the Pre-
service Teacher throughout and following the process. This does not in any way
presuppose or prejudice the investigation or findings but considers the occupational
health and safety of the Pre-service Teacher.


                                    Confidentiality
It is essential that all Pre-service Teachers maintain confidentiality in respect to
information acquired during the professional experience. Information regarding
children, young people and their families should be regarded with the strictest
confidence and should not be disclosed to any person other than those responsible
for the supervision and direction of the Pre-service Teacher. Children’s surnames,
addresses or other identifiers should not be used in any written documentation.

Any identifying details such as name of the school, address, phone numbers, staff
etc must be kept separate from professional experience documentation.

In tutorial discussions, and conversations with friends and family, Pre-service
Teachers should refrain from mentioning children, schools, and staff by name.
Previous professional experience placements should not be discussed at other
schools.




                                                                               35
Informed consent
Post Graduate Pre-service Teachers are learning to work as Teachers and as such,
are not normally conducting research when they gather information on children,
young people and families for planning purposes. As such, their work is not subject
to UWS Ethics Committee approval. However, Pre-service Teachers have an ethical
obligation to seek the informed consent of children or young people (where
appropriate) or their parents or guardians where they are seeking to gather personal
or private information, or develop in-depth documentation for university
assignments.

Letters of informed consent must be distributed and stored confidentially. A sample
letter is included in the Appendices.


                                   Conflict of Interest
Conflict of interest may occur when a situation directly or indirectly compromises the
performance of duties. Pre-service Teachers should not be advantaged or
disadvantaged by close personal relationships with school staff or children/young
people in professional experience settings. Pre-service Teachers should avoid
conflict of interest during professional experience by disclosing information about
any personal relationships in schools where they may undertake professional
experience, when they are nominating a choice of schools on Pre-service Teacher
survey forms. They should assess potential conflicts of interest in terms of the
likelihood of being influenced in the performance of duties in a particular manner.

If Pre-service Teachers become aware of such a situation, they should take
appropriate steps to disclose the conflict to the relevant professional experience
academic coordinator. A sexual or other close personal relationship between a Pre-
service Teacher and a Supervising Teacher is likely to involve serious difficulties
arising from the power disparity inherent in the staff/student relationship. In general,
these relationships should be avoided.

Pre-service Teachers in initial Teacher education courses must not undertake
professional experience where they are employed as a casual Teacher or a
staff member. A conflict of interest arises where payment is being made and a Pre-
service Teacher is fulfilling the role of both a Pre-service Teacher and a paid
employee. Pre-service Teachers should bring to the attention of the professional
experience academic coordinator any conflict of interest that arises in this area.

These guidelines are supported by the Independent Commission Against Corruption
Act 1988 where the definition of corrupt conduct includes ‘any conduct of persons
that adversely affect, or that could adversely affect, either directly or indirectly, the
honest or impartial exercise of official functions by any public official [s.8(1)(a)].

Further information about conflict of interest may be found on the UWS Website
under Policies and Procedures.




                                                                                    36
Duty of Care
The NSW Teacher’s Federation defines Duty of Care. The following adaptation of
the definition can be used as a guide in all settings
(http://www.nswtf.org.au/future_Teachers/legal_stuff.html )

In addition to providing appropriate teaching to meet the varying needs of children
and young people, Pre-service Teachers, like all teachers, have "a duty of care".
This situation means that as a responsible adult they have a legal responsibility for
the safety and wellbeing of those children and young people.

To fulfil this legal responsibility, Pre-service Teachers must always act in a manner
that a court of law would consider "reasonable" in the circumstances. What is
considered "reasonable" would be influenced by the:

   number of the children or young people in their care;
   age and ability of the children or young people;
   activity taking place;
   environment in which the activity takes place.

Pre-service Teachers must ensure that they are familiar with the school's and the
Department of Education and Training's (DET) and Department of Community
Services’ (DOCs) procedures and always work within them.

Accidents can still happen, even to the most experienced of teachers and in the
best regulated classrooms. However, Pre-service Teachers will not have breached
their duty of care unless they can be proved to have been negligent.

Negligence is:

   an action which could reasonably have been expected to contribute, directly or
    indirectly, to causing harm to a child or young person;
   a failure to take action to prevent reasonably foreseeable harm to a child or
    young person.


                                 Physical Contact
All physical interactions with children/young people should be appropriate, and
conducted under the direct supervision of an employee of the school (e.g.
Supervising Teacher). The Pre-service Teacher must familiarise him/herself with
the child protection and behaviour policies of the school and under no
circumstances will a Pre-service Teacher ever engage in physical punishment or
inappropriate behaviour management (physical or emotional) of a child. UWS Pre-
service Teachers must always act in accordance with relevant state and employer
regulations that govern professional experience schools.

Unnecessary physical contact with children and young people should be avoided as
even the most innocent of actions can be misconstrued. This does not mean that
there should be no touching. In the early childhood years, in particular, warm and
appropriate interactions, physical and verbal and non-verbal, are crucial to healthy



                                                                                  37
development and wellbeing. Also, reasonable physical restraint may be used if the
actions of children/young people are likely to be harmful to themselves or to others,
or result in damage to property, including their own.

Following any accident or incident, no matter how trivial it may seem at the time, a
report should be made to your Supervising Teacher and University Advisor without
delay. In some circumstances a report form will need to be completed. See the
NSW Teachers Federation's Welfare Leaflet.


               Occupational Health and Safety and Risk Management
Professional Experience involves working in schools in the role of the Teacher.
Schools are expected to observe appropriate Occupational Health and Safety
considerations and Pre-service Teachers have a responsibility to ensure they can
undertake the physical and mental expectations of the job. Expectations vary
among programs and settings and Pre-service Teachers must familiarise
themselves with what they will be expected to do, which may involve such risks as
lifting, being exposed to infection, considerable writing or typing and travel to
appropriate settings. Pre-service Teachers are also advised to observe appropriate
hygiene and safety practices to protect themselves and the children and young
people with whom they work. Pre-service Teachers who are, or may become,
pregnant before or during their placement are strongly advised to consult their
doctor before undertaking professional experience. Most types of schools have
their own employment policy regarding staff who are pregnant. In DET schools, a
risk assessment will be undertaken to ensure the safety of the Pre-service Teacher
and their unborn baby. Pre-service Teachers who wish to continue with their
professional experience during the latter stages of pregnancy need to discuss the
matter with the Professional Experience Academic Co-ordinator.

If Pre-service Teachers have concerns as to their physical or mental capacity to
undertake the work of a teacher, advice and support may be sought from the UWS
Disability Service or the UWS Equity and Diversity Unit. Information will be treated
with utmost confidentiality (see UWS website).

Pre-service Teachers who apply to undertake a professional experience unit in the
School of Education must take the responsibility for seeking out any support they
may need, and an application for professional experience will be regarded as the
Pre-service Teacher’s verification that they are physically and mentally prepared for
the job. For further information on UWS Occupational Health & Safety policy,
please refer to the UWS website.

Pre-service Teachers who require reasonable effort for accommodation for a
disability must register with the UWS Disability Service before special consideration
is reviewed.


                 Prohibited Professional Experience Placements
Pre-service Teachers will not be placed for professional experience in settings such
as Juvenile Justice and Correctional Centres. Pre-service Teachers wishing to



                                                                                 38
attend government health facilities need to comply with NSW Health policy on
immunisation. As Pre-service Teachers do not comply with existing legislation, they
are not permitted to attend overnight camps.

                            Pre-service Teacher Insurance
All UWS Pre-service Teachers are covered for personal accident/injury and public
liability while engaged in course related activities (refer to the UWS website). This
arrangement includes professional experience field/observation visits and blocks.


Pre-service Teachers requiring confirmation of insurance cover

Letters of indemnity required by Pre-service Teachers (confirming that they have
appropriate insurance cover) can be requested by contacting the Professional
Experience Office on (02) 47360262.

Pre-service Teachers undertaking an activity (e.g. work experience) not required by
their course/unit will still be covered, provided that the activity is approved in writing
from the Head of Program and is related to the Pre-service Teacher’s course of
study.

More details about the nature and extent of cover for Pre-service Teachers can be
obtained from the UWS website http://www.uws.edu.au/finance_office/finance/student_insurances
or by contacting the UWS Accountant, Tax and Insurance on (02) 4570 1217.

In the event of an accident

Pre-service Teachers who are involved in an accident travelling to or from their
professional experience or are injured during professional experience should initially
seek appropriate medical care and follow the reporting procedures in their school.
The UWS Finance’s Office manages claims against the Student Personal Accident
and Injury policy. Pre-service Teachers with claims should, in the first instance,
contact the UWS Accountant, Tax and Insurance on (02) 4570 1217. Pre-service
Teachers should not delay lodging claims as this might jeopardise any settlement to
which they may be entitled. Benefits provided by the policy will have an excess
deducted from any settlements to which the Pre-service Teacher may receive. As
Pre-service Teachers are the insured persons of this policy, it is the Pre-service
Teacher who bears the excess.

Potential liability claims against the university or Pre-service Teacher must be
reported to the Professional Experience Office. Potential claims will arise where a
Pre-service Teacher has been negligent resulting in injury, loss or damage. The
School of Education must then provide full details to the Director of Finance. Failure
to report potential claims may result in the actual claim being rejected by the
university's insurer.




                                                                                          39
Pre-service Teacher Conduct
The highest standard of conduct is expected of Pre-service Teachers at all times.
Pre-service Teachers’ conduct during professional experience is guided by three
policies:

1. College of Arts Professional Experience Reference Group’s Principles of Ethical
   and Professional Behaviour Policy

All UWS Teacher Education Programs have adopted, through the Professional
Experience Reference Group of the university and field representatives, the
Principles of Ethical and Professional Behaviour Policy. See appendices.

2. Academic Misconduct

The UWS Academic Misconduct policy covers cheating, plagiarism and collusion. It
can be found on the UWS website http://policies.uws.edu.au/view.current.php?id=00051

3. Non-Academic Misconduct

The following points have been drawn from the policy as being the most applicable
during professional experience. Pre-service Teachers should refer to the UWS
website http://policies.uws.edu.au/view.current.php?id=00104

Non-Academic Misconduct includes, but is not limited to:
 contravention of UWS Act, By-Laws, Rules or Policies;
 behaves in a manner that prejudices the good name or academic standing of the
  University;
 harasses, vilifies, abuses, threatens, assaults or endangers staff, students or
  other members of the University’s community directly or by other means of
  communication;
 fails to follow reasonable directions of an employee of the University;
 alters or falsifies or fabricates any document or record that the University
  requires of the student (e.g. medical certificate or other supporting
  documentation);
 divulges confidential or personal information relating to any University matter,
  staff member or student in circumstances where there is no reasonable or lawful
  excuse for doing so;
 behaves inappropriately in an activity (eg In the virtual and physical
  environments such as e-learning sites, face to face classes, meetings), facility in
  or under the control or supervision of the University or a recognised University
  student association;
 knowingly provides false or misleading information to staff of the University; or
 fails to comply with a penalty imposed or outcome agreed to under this or other
  policies of the University.




                                                                                40
Code of Ethics for Staff and Students of the School of Education

Our interaction with others will always be conducted with:

                                                    Respect
                                                      Care
                                                    Integrity
                                                   Diligence
                                                   Openness


These are demonstrated by:
    Treating each other with respect
    Being loyal to and supportive of each other
    Working cooperatively and sustainably within our learning communities
    Sharing expertise and knowledge with each other
    Supporting and assisting each other to raise the status of the teaching
      profession
    Acknowledging personal responsibility for learning
    Respecting the right to privacy and confidentiality
    Helping others learn to interact effectively and in doing so balance their own
      rights, needs and feelings with those of community members
(Adapted from Groundwater-Smith, Ewing, & Le Cornu, 2006)


       Professional Experience Complaint Handling and Resolution Policy
Pre-service Teachers should make themselves fully aware of the University’s
Complaint Handling and Resolution Policy. It can be found on the UWS website by
clicking onto http://policies.uws.edu.au/view.current.php?id=00098

                      Professional Experience Privacy Policy
The following are excerpts from the University Privacy Policy Guideline. Pre-service
Teachers should make themselves familiar with the complete document on the
UWS website - http://policies.uws.edu.au/view.current.php?id=00108

The University of Western Sydney is committed to fair personal and health
information handling practices in its educational, research, engagement, and
associated administrative procedures and activities. In protecting the privacy of
personal and health information entrusted to it, the University will meet its statutory
requirements under the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998
(PPIPA) and the Health Records and Information Privacy Act 2002 (HRIPA). In
particular the University will reference its practices and activities against the
Information Protection Principles (IPPs), and the Health Privacy Principles (HPPs)
contained in those Acts. All staff and functional units of the University have an
obligation, in their day to day practices, to adhere to and implement the privacy
principles and practices established by legislation and given detailed expression in
this and other privacy related policies and guidelines and the UWS Privacy
Management Plan .




                                                                                   41
In establishing a policy and administrative framework to protect the privacy of
personal information entrusted to the University it is important to understand what
constitutes personal information as defined in the legislation (PPIPA):

"In this Act, personal information means information or an opinion (including
information or an opinion forming part of a database and whether or not recorded in
a material form) about an individual whose identity is apparent or can reasonably be
ascertained from the information or opinion”

In the University context, personal information includes material such as:
       contact details       - addresses, telephone numbers, email addresses.
       reference numbers - tax file numbers, passport numbers, bank account
                               numbers, photographic images, next of kin etc.

Pre-service Teachers should make themselves familiar with the UWS Privacy
Management Plan at http://policies.uws.edu.au/download.php?id=100 .

Information about University Pre-service Teachers may be disclosed without the
consent of the Pre-service Teacher to university officials or committees deemed to
have a legitimate educational interest.

Information on University Pre-service Teachers (other than as specified in policy)
will be released to third parties only at the written request of the student. This
restriction applies to requests from parents, spouses, DET, credit bureaus and
police.

All staff and functional units of the University have an obligation, in their day to day
practices, to adhere to and implement the privacy principles and practices
established by legislation and given detailed expression in this and other privacy
related policies and guidelines and the UWS Privacy Management Plan.


                                  Inclusive Language
The UWS's Equal Opportunity Policy Statement provides a commitment to equal
opportunity for all staff and students regardless of sex, pregnancy, race, marital
status, homosexuality, age, family responsibilities, disability, transgender, political
conviction or religious belief. As such UWS is committed to the examination of all its
policies and practices to ensure the elimination of discrimination and harassment.

The elimination of non-inclusive and discriminatory language is necessary for
achieving equal opportunity for staff and students. Discriminatory language is both a
symptom of, and a contributor to, the unequal social status of women, people with
disabilities and people from various ethnic and racial backgrounds. Language is a
major vehicle for the expression of prejudice or discrimination. Thus language can
both reflect and shape social reality. UWS supports the use of inclusive, non-
discriminatory language in all official documents and promotes its use in
classrooms, meetings and other settings within the University.




                                                                                     42
Anti Discrimination Legislation in Australia

Australia's commitment to eliminating discrimination has been manifested in a
number of ways, including legislation at the federal level, with the Racial
Discrimination Act 1975, the Sex Discrimination Act 1984, the Human Rights and
Equal Opportunity Act 1986, the Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Act
1999 and the Disability Discrimination Act 1992, and at the state level, with the New
South Wales Anti-Discrimination Act 1977. The Anti-Discrimination Act 1977 covers
discrimination on the grounds of sex, homosexuality, marital status, race, physical
and Intellectual disability, transgender and age. Vilification amendments to the Anti-
Discrimination Act (1977) provide legal sanction on the grounds of homosexuality,
race, transgender or HIV/AIDS status by banning the expression of hatred, serious
contempt and severe ridicule in a wide range of spoken and written forms.

Different Forms of Discriminatory Language

a) Extra-Visibility or Emphasis on Difference
In many contexts it is quite unnecessary to mention a person's sex, race, ethnic
background or disability. For members of minority groups these characteristics are
often mentioned. This type of specification may result in overemphasis on a
particular characteristic, thus creating the impression that the person referred to is
somehow an oddity.

b) Stereotyping
A stereotype is a generalised and relatively fixed image of a person or persons
belonging to a particular group. This image is formed by isolating or exaggerating
certain features - physical, intellectual, cultural, occupational, personal, and so on -
which seem to characterise the group. Stereotypes are discriminatory in that they
take away a person's individuality. Although they may reflect elements of truth,
these are usually misinterpreted or inaccurate owing to oversimplification. The
status of minority groups in society is often adversely influenced by prevailing
stereotypes of them.

c) Derogatory Labelling
The discriminatory nature of derogatory labels used to describe members of minority
groups is often obvious. However, derogatory labels are still commonly used, and
must be avoided.

d) Imposed Labelling
A characteristic often shared by minority groups is their lack of power to define
themselves. Often the names and labels by which they are known, whether
derogatory or not, have been imposed on them. Imposed labelling may be
inaccurate in various ways and may also be alienating for the groups it supposedly
describes.




                                                                                    43
Language and Specific Groups

a) Language, Sex and Gender
Non-sexist language is to ensure a balanced and fair representation of men and
women in language not to 'de-sex' language. Non-sexist language increases clarity
in language use by removing ambiguities, and increases accuracy by avoiding false
assumptions about the nature and roles of women and men in society.

Sexist language is language that expresses bias in favour of one sex and thus
discriminates against the other. In general, the bias is in favour of men and against
women. Language that discriminates against women by not adequately reflecting
their roles, status and presence in society is sexist.

b) Language and Disability
The portrayal of people with disabilities has been fraught with contradictions
because of ambivalent attitudes towards disability. Because people are often
uncomfortable or embarrassed about disability, many euphemisms have been
created to describe disability and people with disabilities.

Discriminatory language in relation to the portrayal of people with disabilities is
characterised by derogatory labelling, by depersonalising, by stereotyping and by
emphasising the disability rather than the person.

c) Language, Race and Ethnicity
Australia's population is comprised of people from different ethnic and racial
backgrounds, some of whom are Indigenous to Australia. Language plays a major
role in expressing group relations and group conflicts. Ethnic and racial labels,
names and expressions are created and used to portray certain groups as inferior or
superior to others. Non-discriminatory language in relation to race and ethnicity aims
to recognise and present the diversity of Australia's population in positive ways.

d) Language and Indigenous Australians
An Indigenous Australian is an Aboriginal person or Torres Strait Islander, who
identifies as such, is of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent and is
recognised as such by the community. The separate linguistic and cultural identity of
the Indigenous people of the Torres Strait Islands must be recognised. The
preferred term is Torres Strait Islander.

The linguistic portrayal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people has been
mainly negative and stereotypical. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are
most often described in racial group terms, rarely as individuals with personal
names. 'Aboriginals' was often used as a noun to describe the Indigenous people of
Australia instead of its use as an adjective which is acceptable, eg. the Aboriginal
Education Unit, the Aboriginal people of Australia, Aboriginal employees/students.

Wherever possible an Aboriginal person or group's preference of title should be
used. If in doubt, ask the person or group. At UWS consultation with either the staff




                                                                                  44
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Professional%20 experience%20protocols2011 1

  • 1. College of Arts School of Education Bankstown & Penrith Campuses Professional Experience Protocols 2011 The Teaching Profession and the University Working in Partnership www.uws.edu.au
  • 2. University Contacts For administrative enquiries (eg pay claims, placements, insurance details) or in the case of an emergency please contact: Sonia Bodnaruk Professional Experience Administrative Officer (Secondary) Phone: 02 4736 0068 Fax: 02 4736 0407 Email: s.bodnaruk@uws.edu.au Academic enquiries regarding the professional experience in the first instance should be directed to the nominated University Advisor who will contact the school For specific information regarding the unit (subject) requirements or if you have any feedback please contact the Professional Experience Academic Co-ordinator: Professional Experience Academic Co-ordinator: Mary Mooney Office Location: Building J Room 1.13 – Penrith (Kingswood) Campus Phone: (02) 4736 0325 Fax: (02) 4736 0407 Email: m.mooney@uws.edu.au Postal Address Professional Experience Unit- Penrith Campus School of Education University of Western Sydney Locked Bag 1797 PENRITH NSW 2751 Website: www.uws.edu.au 2
  • 3. Contents University Contacts ...........................................................................................................2 Welcome and Introduction ................................................................................................5 SECTION ONE ..................................................................................................... 8 Preparing for Professional Experience .........................................................................9 Introduction ..............................................................................................................9 Professional Experience Prerequisites ....................................................................9 Support Services for UWS Students........................................................................9 SECTION TWO.....................................................................................................11 Implementing Quality Supervision ................................................................................12 Key Personnel..........................................................................................................12 Roles and Responsibilities for Key Personnel .........................................................12 SECTION THREE .................................................................................................18 Administrative Responsibilities.....................................................................................19 Enrolment.................................................................................................................19 Placement of Pre-service Teachers.........................................................................19 Attendance...............................................................................................................19 Volunteering.............................................................................................................21 Withdrawal from Professional Experience ...............................................................21 SECTION FOUR ...................................................................................................23 Pre-service Teacher Progress .......................................................................................24 Maximising Pre-service Teacher success and minimising the likelihood of failure in Professional Experience ..............................................24 Professional Experience Grades .............................................................................24 Pre-service Teacher Report.....................................................................................25 Pre-service Teacher Progress during Professional Experience ..............................26 Progression across Professional Experience Units .................................................29 SECTION FIVE ..................................................................................................... 31 Professional, Ethical and Legal Responsibilities.........................................................32 Ethics .......................................................................................................................32 Child Protection........................................................................................................33 Confidentiality ..........................................................................................................34 Informed Consent ....................................................................................................34 Conflict of Interest ....................................................................................................35 Duty of Care.............................................................................................................35 Physical Contact ......................................................................................................36 Occupational Health &Safety and Risk Management ..............................................37 Prohibited Professional Experience Placements .....................................................38 Pre-service Teacher Insurance................................................................................38 Pre-service Teacher Conduct ..................................................................................39 School of Education Code of Ethics for Staff and Students.....................................40 Professional Experience Complaint Handling and Resolution Policy ......................40 Professional Experience Privacy Policy...................................................................40 Inclusive Language ..................................................................................................41 Anti Discrimination Legislation in Australia ..............................................................42 3
  • 4. SECTION SIX .......................................................................................................45 Documentation and Appendices Sample Notification of Pre-service Teacher Requiring Additional Support Form (RAS1) And Learning Plan 1 (LP 1)..……………………………………………………..…….. 46 Sample Committee of Advice - Pre-service Teacher At Risk of Failing Professional Experience Form (AR1), Learning Plan 2 (LP 2) & Committee of Advice – Review of Pre-service Teacher At Risk of Failing Professional Experience Form (AR2) .........48 School of Education Child Protection Protocol 2011 ...............................................51 Principles of Ethical and Professional Behaviour Policy ..........................................52 4
  • 5. Welcome Dear Colleagues and Pre-service Teachers, The quality of Teacher education programs at the University of Western Sydney rests on the strength of partnerships with the profession and the communities of Greater Western Sydney. Teachers in schools and other educational settings who supervise the Pre-service Teachers from UWS are integral to our partnership with the profession. I thank Teachers for agreeing to supervise one or more of our Pre-service Teachers, and Pre-service Teachers for their commitment and professionalism. I appreciate the amount of work and effort they will dedicate to this task. In return, I hope that the relationships between our Pre-service Teachers, Supervising Teachers, and University Advisors are professionally rewarding. Warm regards Associate Professor Steve Wilson Head, School of Education Introduction In a knowledge society, effective teacher education programs aim to prepare teachers who:  are skilled practitioners  are knowledgeable about teaching and learning  are reflective about their work and act ethically and wisely, based on their reflections  undertake ongoing professional development  research and improve their work  are advocates for Teachers, students and for teaching and learning  have the capacity to interact with other professionals and with the broader community in meaningful ways (based upon Ryan, 2002) To facilitate the preparation of such teachers, at the University of Western Sydney (UWS) Pre-service Teachers:  are introduced in early childhood, family and community settings, schools and at the university to the theories and practices required of effective Teachers;  develop, implement, reflect upon and refine their own personal theories of effective practice with the support of teachers, other staff, and university lecturers;  research and reflect on their experiences, their actions, their own learning and that of the children and young people they teach; 5
  • 6. complete assignments in schools and at the university which are authentic to teaching and learning, and the roles of teachers. UWS Graduate Attributes The University of Western Sydney has developed a set of attributes that apply to all its students. The NSW Institute of Teachers’ Framework for Professional Teaching Standards can be found at http://www.nswteachers.nsw.edu.au/ A UWS graduate: communicates effectively through reading,  communication listening, speaking and writing in diverse skills contexts applies appropriate numerical skills to  numeracy understand, interpret and solve problems commands multiple skills and  social literacies to enable adaptable is a self-reliant learner who works effectively in interaction groups and teams lifelong learning skills accesses, evaluates and uses relevant  information information to solve problems and to continue literacy learning  technology applies communication and other technologies literacy effectively in personal and professional learning  has in-depth knowledge in one or more chosen fields of study  understands how this knowledge is connected with other fields demonstrates and disciplines comprehensive, coherent and connected knowledge  understands the local and international relevance of their chosen field(s) of study  understands the values and principles of scholarly inquiry  integrates theoretical and practical knowledge to analyse and solve complex and novel problems applies knowledge through intellectual inquiry in  applies critical, reflective, and creative skills to make informed professional or applied decisions in professional or applied contexts contexts  engages effectively in advancing knowledge both independently and collaboratively  understands and values ethical conduct, intellectual integrity, and professionalism in work and civic life brings knowledge to life  engages responsibly in work and civic life with respect for diversity through responsible and social justice principles engagement and appreciation of diversity in an evolving  can initiate and contribute positively to sustainable change in a world diverse and evolving world 6
  • 7. Professional experience is an enriching growth experience when university lecturers and teachers (to be referred to in this document as Supervising Teachers in recognition of their role in the professional preparation of Pre-service Teachers) in educational settings work collegially to provide the best possible professional experience for Pre-service Teachers leading to their induction as new members of the teaching profession. This partnership respects the needs and expertise of teachers and university lecturers. In this partnership “each partner has something to offer the joint enterprise (i.e. professional experience), which is different from but complements that which is offered by the other partners” (Day, 1998, p.419). During professional experience Supervising Teachers in schools and other educational settings undertake the day-to-day professional development of Pre- service Teachers. Supervising Teachers are supported in this role by University Advisors who work with them and the Pre-service Teachers. University Advisors working in professional experience settings act as mentors to Pre-service Teachers, assisting them to fulfil university and school responsibilities as well as realise their own personal goals for professional development. University Advisors help Pre-service Teachers make sense of their experiences (to link theory and evidence-based practice) and challenge them to think more deeply about broader teaching and societal issues as well as the ethical and moral issues embedded in teaching. University Advisors also act as professional colleagues to Supervising Teachers as they undertake their important roles. Welcome, as a Field or University Based Teacher Educator to the Professional Experience Program. Thank you for your support of our Pre-service Teachers in their professional development Regards, UWS Professional Experience Unit References Day, (1998). The role of higher education in fostering lifelong learning partnerships with Teachers. European Journal of Education 33 (4), 419-432. Ryan, M., (2002). Teaching and vocational learning. Unicorn. Journal of the Australian College of Educators 28 (3), 29-33. 7
  • 8. SECTION ONE Preparing for Professional Experience  Introduction  Professional Experience Prerequisites  Services for Pre-service Teachers 8
  • 9. Preparing for Professional Experience Introduction Professional experience is of paramount importance to their development as the next generation of teachers. Success for all participants (Pre-service Teachers, Supervising Teachers, University Advisors, children and young people) is facilitated if sound preparation occurs beforehand and a well-organised approach is continuously maintained. Pre-service Teachers are reminded that professional experience draws upon all reading and coursework- it is not an isolated experience. professional experience can be physically and psychologically tiring. Pre-service Teachers are reminded to make every effort to maintain their health and wellbeing during this time by eating well, maintaining exercise and minimising demanding social activities. The following section may help all participants have a rewarding and fulfilling experience. The professional experience dates are negotiated between schools for specified dates. Pre-service Teachers must ensure their availability for these set dates when enrolling. Only under exceptional circumstances and with the permission of the Secondary Professional Experience Academic Coordinator and the agreement of schools can these dates be varied. Professional Experience Prerequisites It is the Pre-service Teacher’s responsibility to ensure that they meet the prerequisites for each professional experience unit they undertake. Details can be found in the relevant Unit Handbook/Calendar of the year in which the Pre-service Teacher first enrolled but will include having completed a UWS Child Protection Workshop and submitted a Working With Children Check Declaration on enrolment. Support Services for UWS Students For further information look at the UWS website under “Information for Current Students” and click on “Getting help”. The following is a brief description of services that Pre-service Teachers might find of benefit during their studies at the University of Western Sydney. Counselling Service: Counselling is free and available on a strictly confidential basis to all members of the UWS community – students, new graduates and staff. Services include:  Private and confidential counseling sessions  Advocacy for academic, administrative, complaint and misconduct issues  Study and life skills workshops  Advice and information on mental health and illness  Advice for mature age students 9
  • 10. Disability Service: The Disability Service provides support and assistance to prospective and current students with disabilities and chronic health conditions in all types and levels of university courses. Under the Disability Amended Act 2009 students who identify to the university that they have a disability or chronic health condition must be provided with reasonable educational adjustments. To register with the Disability Service, phone 9852 5199 and make an appointment. For further information please refer to website http://www.uws.edu.au/currentstudents/current_students/getting_help/disability_service Students are encouraged to disclose the need for reasonable effort to be made to accommodate their special needs during their professional experience setting to their Professional Experience Academic Co-ordinator in the first instance. The Student Learning Unit: The Student Learning Unit (SLU) organises and runs a variety of programs and courses to develop students' academic literacy, mathematics and study skills, and participates in many collaborative projects with schools and colleges to enhance the academic achievement of UWS students All services offered by the SLU are free to UWS students and include:  SLU Workshops  Bridging Programs  PASS – peer assisted study sessions  Online Learning  Collaboration with Schools and Colleges Further information can be found at: http://www.uws.edu.au/currentstudents/current_students/getting_help/study_and_life_skills_workshops UWS Careers and Co-operative Education Unit: The UWS Careers and Co- operative Education Unit aims to enhance the employability of UWS students whilst establishing links with organisations, starting with those in Greater Western Sydney. We offer a range of programs and services to equip students and recent graduates with the skills to manage their own career development. These include careers workshops and resources on Career Planning, Résumés, Job Applications, Job Interviews and Work Experience. This unit can be contacted on (02) 4736 0371. Chaplaincy: The Chaplains are available on all campuses and provide a service for those who wish to find spiritual directions in life. Major areas include spiritual wellbeing, general support for students, regular meetings and small group work. Student Centre: KINGSWOOD Phone Building K 1300 897669 10
  • 11. SECTION TWO Implementing Quality Supervision  Key Personnel  Roles and Responsibilities for Key Personnel 11
  • 12. Implementing Quality Supervision Key Personnel The key personnel involved in the professional development of future teachers (Pre- service Teachers) are:  School Professional Experience Coordinator – Each school has a nominated staff member who undertakes the role as the Professional Experience Coordinator. This coordinator is employed by the university as a casual UWS staff member to liaise between Pre-service Teachers, school staff and the university.  Supervising Teacher - the field based teacher, employed by the university as a casual staff member to supervise the Pre-service Teacher in a school.  Pre-service Teacher – the university student.  University Advisor – a full-time, part-time or casual employee of the university, employed to provide a link between the university and the school.  Children and young people – the school child/student. Roles and Responsibilities of Key Personnel in Professional Experience SCHOOL PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE COORDINATOR Before the Professional Experience  Allocate Pre-service Teachers to accredited, competent Supervising Teachers  Distribute documentation to Supervising Teachers and assist Supervising Teachers in interpreting the materials  Notify (if applicable) Supervising Teachers of pre-professional experience briefing meeting session date/time and encourage their attendance  Attend pre-professional experience briefing meeting (if conducted)  Become familiar with and understand the philosophies, practices and expectations of the professional experience  Respond to Supervising Teachers’ enquiries  Refer concerns/enquiries to University Advisor if necessary  Notify university of changed circumstances which affect Pre-service Teachers  Confirm the names of Supervising Teachers with the Professional Experience Office in order to process pay claims and letters of appreciation 12
  • 13. During the Professional Experience  During week 1, be responsible for collecting Pre-service Teacher’s class timetables for University Advisors  Be responsible for organising meeting space with University Advisors and Pre- service Teachers  Be responsible for the implementation of the professional experiences in the school  Support Supervising Teachers and Pre-service Teachers in establishing positive working relationships  Assist Pre-service Teachers in their orientation to the school including making available documents referring to policies and procedures  Encourage Pre-service Teachers’ professional growth and contribution at a school level  Monitor Pre-service Teachers’/ Supervising Teachers day-to-day attitudes and activities  Monitor Pre-service Teacher’s attendance and progress  Document and refer concerns about Pre-service Teachers to University Advisor  Provide advice/assistance to Pre-service Teachers and Supervising Teachers  Be a member of the Committee of Advice where established After the Professional Experience  Check Pre-service Teacher’s final reports in consultation with Supervising Teachers and University Advisor  Ensure that all original final reports and attendance registers are returned to the university  Submit Teacher payment claims to the university  Submit payment claim as a coordinator when 3 or more students are placed in the school SUPERVISING TEACHERS Before the Professional Experience  Attend pre-professional experience briefing meeting if conducted  Become familiar with and understand the philosophies, practices and expectations of the professional experience in order to help the Pre-service Teacher make the connection between “theory” and “evidence-based practice”  Prepare work area for the Pre-service Teacher  Prepare the class or group for the arrival of the Pre-service Teacher  Plan for a regular time to give daily feedback to the Pre-service Teacher  Ensure that you have received and read all materials from the university by the beginning of the block professional experience 13
  • 14. During the Professional Experience  Become knowledgeable about the Pre-service Teachers, their special areas of university study, prior teaching experiences, personal interests, extracurricular strengths, areas of concerns, personal goals for professional experience, and preferred style of supervision  Clarify your own expectations and those of the school to the Pre-service Teacher  Assist Pre-service Teacher/s with planning and preparation  Assist Pre-service Teacher/s with investigations of the school and other university requirements  Monitor Pre-service Teacher/s in classroom and school in all interactions with children, young people, other staff, parents and community members. Ensure that Pre-service Teachers do not to take responsibility for children/young people alone.  Provide ongoing oral feedback on their professional performance in the school  Provide written feedback at least once per day  Discuss written feedback with Pre-service Teacher/s and return this feedback to the Pre-service Teacher/s each day  Model appropriate teaching and learning techniques and strategies  Encourage the Pre-service Teacher/s to show initiative while implementing a range of teaching and learning techniques and strategies in a variety of developmental, content and curriculum areas  Notify University Advisor of any concerns  Consult with University Advisor regularly and at meetings where appropriate  Convene Committee of Advice where established  Communicate to Pre-service Teacher/s about their progress and provide oral and written feedback drawing attention to areas of strength and weakness  Provide Pre-service Teacher/s with specific strategies (in writing and verbally) for developing areas in need of improvement  Support Pre-service Teacher/s critical reflection on their teaching practice and professional standing  In consultation with others and in accordance with procedures set out in the unit handbook, determine whether the Pre-service Teacher has made satisfactory progress  Complete final report, allocate a grade and discuss report with the Pre-service Teacher before the final day of block. After the Professional Experience  Provide original of the final report and any other relevant documentation including attendance registers to the Student Teacher who is responsible to deliver all documentation to the Professional Experience Unit. Details on how the Supervising Teachers may claim payment is advised on the pay claim which is supplied on the CD. 14
  • 15. UNIVERSITY ADVISOR Before the Professional Experience  Become familiar with and understand the philosophies, practices and expectations of the professional experience  Attend pre-professional experience briefing meeting if conducted  Make contact with the school and provide the Supervising Teacher and the school professional experience coordinator with your contact details  Ensure all documentation is received by schools  Complete all employment documentation before commencing work (eg Casual Employment Authority) During the Professional Experience  In the first week, confirm that the Pre-service Teacher has been attending  Visit school as required by the Unit Coordinator and according to the needs of the Pre-service Teachers  Provide Supervising Teachers, School Coordinators and Pre-service Teachers with a contact number or email address  Sign the Pre-service Teacher’s attendance register for each visit  Meet with Supervising Teachers and Pre-service Teachers (where possible) on each visit  Monitor Pre-service Teacher progress and attendance in consultation with Supervising Teacher and school professional experience coordinator  Review Pre-service Teacher documentation as appropriate  Give Pre-service Teachers feedback on their professional progress, in relation to the outcomes of the Unit on each visit  Assist Pre-service Teachers to fulfil university and school responsibilities as well as realise their own personal goals for professional development  Assist Pre-service Teachers in making sense of their experiences (to link theory and evidence-based practice)  Challenge Pre-service Teachers to think more deeply about broader teaching and societal issues as well as the ethical and moral dilemmas embedded in teaching  Participate, if required, in the Committee of Advice  Maintain phone contact with schools as required  Check Pre-service Teacher final report in the last week of the block After the Professional Experience  Return any necessary documentation to the Professional Experience Unit PRE-SERVICE TEACHER Before the Professional Experience  Know placement –school, class/group, Teacher etc  Confirm placement with Professional Experience Office if not advised by the university one week prior to the commencement of your first visit 15
  • 16. Become familiar with and understand the philosophies, practices and expectations of the professional experience  Attend pre-professional experience briefing meeting and/or Professional Experience unit program as applicable  Ensure that a Working With Children Check Declaration has been completed at enrolment to the university  Complete a School of Education (UWS) Child Protection training workshop  Attend all In School visits as scheduled  Be familiar with the professional and ethical codes of conduct expected of Teachers  Prepare documentation for professional experience  Develop an understanding of the school, family and community  Ensure that the Supervising Teacher has taken delivery of a school package During the Professional Experience  Be familiar with school philosophies, policies, procedures, resources and equipment  Regularly check vUWS and Student Email Account for urgent messages  Be familiar and comply with relevant UWS policies, particularly academic and non-academic conduct policies  Complete all required school-based activities and documentation  Attend all required days  Arrive each day at least 30 minutes before the commencement of the teaching day  Sign the attendance register prior to commencing work and again at the end of each day and ensure that the Supervising Teacher co-signs register  In case of illness or unavoidable absences contact the school, Professional Experience Office and University Advisor immediately to advise that you will be absent. Submit a medical certificate to the Professional Experience Office and retain a copy for yourself  Make up any absence from professional experience as per Attendance Policy in this document  Maintain and/or develop ethical and professional knowledge, skills, attitudes and conduct at school  Display a responsible, professional attitude towards teaching and being a Teacher  Develop an awareness of the major agencies and institutions that offer support to Teachers and families  Interact with members of the school community in such a way so as to maximise opportunities for personal growth as a Teacher  Negotiate, discuss and plan learning experiences with the Supervising Teacher and document independently prior to implementation.  Have documented planning approved by Supervising Teacher prior to implementation  Identify and provide for individual differences amongst children and young people  Complete and have available daily all relevant documentation (including lesson plans) 16
  • 17. Ensure Supervising Teacher has viewed all lesson plans at least 24 working hours before lesson delivery  Develop and refine a variety of teaching skills and strategies for the achievement of desired learning outcomes  Teach lessons or engage in experiences as stipulated in the relevant Unit Handbook  Evaluate all teaching sessions and complete required self-evaluations and reflections  Attend negotiated feedback sessions with Supervising Teacher before/after class time as necessary  Notify concerns to Supervising Teacher, school professional experience coordinator, University Advisor, UWS professional experience academic co- ordinator as necessary  Attend and participate in Committee of Advice if established  Sight and sign final report before it is submitted to the university After the Professional Experience  Submit all required documentation to the university if required by the unit handbook, within one week of completion of the block  Make an appointment immediately with the professional experience academic co-ordinator IF you failed the practicum, in order to develop a Progress Plan  Collect original report from University Professional Experience Unit once it has been processed which should be immediately if all documentation is correct. 17
  • 18. SECTION THREE Administrative Responsibilities  Enrolment  Placement of Pre-service Teachers  Attendance  Volunteering  Withdrawal from Professional Experience 18
  • 19. Administrative Responsibilities Enrolment All Pre-service Teachers must have confirmed enrolment in the appropriate unit before the commencement of their professional experience. Enrolment will not be confirmed until a Working with Children Check Declaration has been signed and submitted to student services. Failure to correctly enrol will result in the professional experience placement being cancelled. Pre-service Teachers need to ensure they have completed all prerequisites before enrolling in any professional experience unit. In this way they would follow the recommended patterns in the professional experience program. All Pre-service Teachers must complete mandatory Child Protection training as outlined in the School of Education Child Protection Protocol before their professional experience placement commences. Placement of Pre-service Teachers Enrolled Pre-service Teachers are usually placed by administrative and academic staff at schools that have agreed to take Pre-service Teachers when surveyed through the UWS School of Education Professional Experiences Office. Pre-service Teachers should not approach schools for placements. Although the UWS School of Education Professional Experiences Unit makes every effort to match Pre-service Teachers with schools that are in their desired location, often there are not enough schools offering to take Pre-service Teachers in a particular area. Pre-service Teachers may need to make special transport, work or child care arrangements to attend the professional experience. If a Pre-service Teacher requires special consideration concerning placement for professional experience, they are required to advise the Professional Experience Academic Coordinator at the beginning of semester and before placements have been allocated. Pre-service Teachers may be required to submit documentation to support their application for special consideration eg Doctor’s certificate. If special consideration is granted, reasonable effort to accommodate Pre-service Teacher’s requirements will be made in line with university policy and the availability of a suitable setting. Attendance Pre-service Teachers are expected to:  attend every day during the professional experience placement (including all visits)  ensure that they are punctual to schools 19
  • 20. present at school throughout the normal operating hours and both prior to and after normal hours according to the normal staff practice  remain at the school throughout the day.  obtain the permission of the principal if they need to be away from the school at any time. During the professional experience Pre-service Teachers are expected to participate in all the normal duties of a Teacher including working a full day. Pre-service Teachers should participate under the direct supervision of their Supervising Teacher in all routines including playground duty, bus duty, sport activities, staff meetings, parent meetings etc. It is desirable, where possible, that Pre-service Teachers are accommodated in normal staffrooms. Attendance Register Each Pre-service Teacher is required by the university to sign an Attendance Register each day. An Attendance Register will be provided by the University. The Supervising Teacher should co-sign this form. Pre-service Teacher’s require these attendance registers when registering with the NSW Institute of Teachers to verify number of professional experience days and to be awarded a final grade by UWS. The University Advisor should also sign the Pre-service Teacher’s attendance register when they are present in the school. Attendance during industrial disputes Pre-service Teachers are advised to investigate all perspectives related to disputes to deepen their critical understandings of the professional, industrial, ethical and legal responsibilities of Teachers. This may include attending meetings, reviewing publications and engaging in discussions. Pre-service Teachers should not attend a school on the days in which Teachers are engaged in strike action. Pre-service Teachers are generally expected to make up missed teaching time, although alternate activities related to these disputes may be considered in lieu of missed days. Pre-service Teachers should contact the Professional Experience Academic Coordinator for further details. Absences In the case of unavoidable absences the following procedure is to be carried out by the Pre-service Teacher:  Notify the Professional Experience Unit and school of the reason and probable duration of the absence. The Professional Experience Unit will notify the University Advisor if required.  Submit relevant documentation (eg medical certificate) to the Professional Experience Unit by the end of the block. 20
  • 21. Retain a copy of the documentation for your records. In courses where Pre-service Teachers are required to complete visits, the requirements for these visits must be completed prior to the commencement of the block professional experience period. Failure to comply with these requirements may result in the award of an unsatisfactory grade (U grade). In the event of absences occurring in excess of three days the Pre-service Teacher may be deemed not to have completed the professional experience and an unsatisfactory grade may be awarded. Pre-service Teachers will only be allowed to resume the block in exceptional circumstances and with the permission of the relevant Professional Experience Academic Coordinator. All absences will need to be made up within seven "teaching days" of the completion of the block professional experience period. If this is not possible, the Pre-service Teacher is to negotiate the dates with the Professional Experience Academic Coordinator. Volunteering Pre-service Teachers and schools can benefit if Pre-service Teachers volunteer to spend more than their allocated days in a school. Pre-service Teachers undertaking volunteer work that is not required by their course/unit will still be covered by UWS student insurance cover provided that the activity is approved and is related to the Pre-service Teacher’s course of study. Approval for this must be in writing from the Head of Program. Pre-service Teachers must undertake the same processes of registering as a volunteer in the setting as any other volunteer would. Pre-service Teachers are not permitted to attend overnight camps (see page 39). Withdrawal from Professional Experience Pre-service Teachers may choose to, or be advised to, withdraw from Professional Experience for medical reasons or exceptional circumstances. Applications for withdrawal without penalty must be supported by a medical certificate or letter from a UWS Counsellor. Pre-service Teachers must apply for withdrawal through Student Central, in writing. Pre-service Teachers who choose to withdraw from a school after the commencement of a placement for undocumented reasons will be awarded an unsatisfactory grade unless the relevant Professional Experience Academic Co- ordinator has approved the allocation of an alternative grade. If a Pre-service Teacher withdraws from a Professional Experience unit and/or school after placement has been made she or he MUST advise IN WRITING (via Student Email Account is preferred) immediately the:  Professional Experience Unit;  Professional Experience Academic Coordinator; 21
  • 22. School Professional Experience Coordinator; and,  Student Central Pre-service Teachers will not be permitted to undertake the professional experience again until it is next offered. 22
  • 23. SECTION FOUR Pre-service Teacher Progress  Maximising Pre-service Teacher Success and Minimising the Likelihood of Failure in Professional Experience  Professional Experience Grades  Pre-service Teacher Report  Pre-service Teacher Progress during Professional Experience  Progression across Professional Experience Units 23
  • 24. Pre-service Teacher Progress Maximising Pre-service Teacher success and minimising likelihood of failure in professional experience Learning to be a Teacher is a complex, personal and, at times, difficult matter that involves transformation from “student of teaching” to “Teacher of students” (Ganser, 2002). During this time Pre-service Teachers are expected to try out (with relatively unfamiliar children, classes and environment) their own beliefs about learning and teaching, and the knowledge and pedagogy (practices) they have learnt at university. As they try out their beliefs and developing knowledge and pedagogies, they may make some mistakes. This situation is to be expected. It is through the observation of teachers and classes; trialling their ideas and pedagogies; reflecting on the success or otherwise of these ‘trials’; and, re-trialling on the basis of their reflections and feedback from Supervising Teachers that Pre-service Teachers develop their own professional pedagogical knowledge and practice, and become Beginning Teachers. However, if Pre-service Teachers experience serious or ongoing difficulties then the processes outlined in this section need to be applied. Initially, Supervising Teachers can take the following steps to maximise Pre-service Teacher success and minimise the possibility of failure:  prepare the class, positively, for the arrival of the Pre-service Teacher;  get to know the Pre-service Teacher as well as possible – how they approach a challenge, how they react to constructive criticism, how they react to change;  take into account the Pre-service Teacher’s background and previous experiences;  have regular meetings with the Pre-service Teacher and encourage them to share any difficulties they may be experiencing;  encourage the Pre-service Teacher to have informal contact with other members of staff;  use active listening skills;  try to deal with any difficulties early and at a low level before they become serious, do not presume that the problem will be resolved without direction;  follow university guidelines carefully with a Pre-service Teacher whose progress is “causing concern”. (based upon Brookes & Sikes, 1997, p.114). Professional Experience Grades A Satisfactory grade will result in the Pre-service Teacher passing the professional experience and an Unsatisfactory grade in professional experience will result in the Pre-service Teacher failing the professional experience unit. 24
  • 25. When Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grades are used, the following criteria apply: S – Satisfactory This grade is awarded to any Pre-service Teacher who is considered by the Supervising Teacher to have demonstrated a satisfactory level of competence according to the criteria of the particular Professional Experience unit. Where a Pre-service Teacher’s work is considered outstanding or well above average, this judgement should be reflected in the written comments in the final report. U – Unsatisfactory No Pre-service Teacher should receive an Unsatisfactory grade without being placed At Risk and the Committee of Advice being convened. This grade may be recommended on the final report on ONE or more of the following grounds:  Performance Deficiencies – i.e. failure to exhibit criteria indicated for the particular Professional Experience unit  Withdrawing from Professional Experience – unless a Withdrawal Without Penalty is awarded.  Non-Academic Misconduct Pre-service Teacher Report Each unit has a specific Pre-service Teacher report. Reference should be made to the individual program’s specific handbook. In general, the report should be written towards the end of the final week of the block professional experience. The final report is based on a summation of the daily written feedback that has been previously discussed and given to the Pre-service Teacher. The final report is the responsibility of the Supervising Teacher. The Pre-service Teacher must be given the opportunity to read and discuss the final report with the Supervising Teacher. There should be no surprises for the Pre-service Teacher in what is written. The original report and attendance register should be mailed by the School Professional Experience Coordinator to the Professional Experience Office no later than the week following the conclusion of the professional experience. PRE-SERVICE TEACHER’S FINAL GRADES FOR PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE UNITS ARE NOT RECOMMENDED UNTIL ORIGINAL REPORTS AND ATTENDANCE REGISTERS ARE SUBMITTED TO THE PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE OFFICE. LATE RECEIPT OF ORIGINAL REPORTS AND ATTENDANCE REGISTERS MAY LEAD TO PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS NOT RECEIVING A GRADE FOR THEIR PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE UNIT AND COULD RESULT IN THE PRE- SERVICE TEACHER NOT GRADUATING. Pre-service Teachers must collect the original report from the Professional Experience Office two weeks after completing their professional experience. 25
  • 26. Pre-service Teacher Progress During Professional Experience In most cases Pre-service Teachers will make satisfactory progress towards meeting the professional experience outcomes. In cases where Pre-service Teachers are not making satisfactory progress the procedures for Pre-service Teachers whose progress is “causing concern” should be followed. Pre-service Teachers Achieving Satisfactory Progress When Pre-service Teachers are making satisfactory progress the Supervising Teacher should:  follow the roles and responsibilities of key personnel in Section 2 of this book and the relevant Professional Experience Handbook  provide daily written and verbal feedback as detailed in the Unit Handbook  identify progress towards meeting the professional experience outcomes Pre-service Teachers Whose Progress is Causing Concern Pre-service Teachers may experience difficulties in meeting the requirements of the professional experience for a variety of reasons. These reasons include:  Professionalism – attendance, punctuality, preparation of plans and resources; teaching including poor communication processes; behaviour management; ability to accept and/or act upon advice and instruction; appropriate verbal or physical interactions with children or young people, families and staff; teamwork and all other aspects of professional standards and professional ethics.  Personal attributes – initiative, reflective practice, empathy, warmth, enthusiasm, commitment.  Unit (subject) and teaching requirements and standards as documented in unit requirements and assessments for the relevant program and level of course. The Supervising Teacher, University Advisor, School Professional Experience Coordinator, or the Pre-service Teacher can identify a Pre-service Teacher as ‘causing concern’. This identification may be made during visits or during the block professional experience (generally in the first week). Early identification of any concerns ensures that the Pre-service Teacher receives appropriate support. It is essential that Supervising Teachers identify concerns on the written feedback they provide. Should a number of concerns be identified and/or the Pre-service Teacher does not respond to feedback the Pre-service Teacher must be identified as “Requiring Additional Support (RAS)” and the procedures outlined below must be followed. Pre-service Teachers Requiring Additional Support (RAS) Pre-service Teachers who are not making satisfactory progress must be identified as Requiring Additional Support. This identification should be made by the end of the first week of the block practicum to allow time for Pre-service Teachers to act on advice. The following procedures should be followed: 26
  • 27. The Supervising Teacher *  Documents concerns on the form RAS1 (Meeting 1)  Outlines goals and strategies and a date for achievement (generally 2-3 days later)  Discusses the strategies needed to rectify the situation with the Pre-service Teacher (Learning Plan 1)  Provides a copy for the Pre-service Teacher and fax a copy to the Professional Experience Office immediately, so that the University Advisor can be informed  Monitors the Pre-service Teacher’s progress providing daily written feedback (the University Advisor should stay in telephone contact during this time)  Reassesses the Pre-service Teacher’s progress on the agreed upon date (Meeting 2)  Uses the form RAS1 to document the outcome of this meeting. The form must clearly state whether the Pre-service Teacher has met the set goals and whether the Pre-service Teacher is now making satisfactory progress. Where the goals have not been met, or where new concerns have been identified the Pre-service Teacher must be notified that they are “At Risk of Failing the Professional Experience” and the procedures set out below must be followed,  A copy is given to the Pre-service Teacher and a copy faxed to the Professional Experience Office. * The University Advisor can also initiate the RAS processed in consultation with the Supervising Teacher. Pre-service Teachers At Risk of Failing in the Professional Experience Pre-service Teachers must be notified that they are “At Risk of Failing the Professional Experience” when they:  have been placed at RAS and have not made satisfactory progress  have met the set goals during RAS but new concerns have arisen  have reached the halfway point of the professional experience and are at risk of not meeting one or more of the professional experience outcomes In most cases Pre-service Teachers will be identified as RAS before being notified that they are “At Risk of Failing Professional Experience”, however, if concerns arise at the half way point or later Pre-service Teachers may be placed “At Risk of Failing Professional Experience” without first going through RAS. Procedures for Pre-service Teachers At Risk of Failing Professional Experience  Identify the Pre-service Teacher At Risk  Arrange for a meeting between the Pre-service Teacher, the Supervising Teacher and the University Advisor (Meeting 3) 27
  • 28. Document the reasons for the Pre-service Teacher being At Risk, goals, strategies and timelines on the At Risk Form (AR1)  Discuss specific strategies needed to remediate the situation with the Pre- service Teacher (Learning Plan 2)  Give a copy to the Pre-service Teacher and fax to the Professional Experience Office (fax number provided on form)  Monitor progress  Provide daily written feedback  Assess progress at a meeting (Meeting 4) involving the University Advisor, Pre-service Teacher, Supervising Teacher and if possible the school professional experience coordinator.  Ensure all participants have the opportunity to state their views on the Pre- service Teacher’s progress  Document the outcome of this meeting using the form At Risk 2 (AR2) The Pre-service Teacher may not ‘defer’ or ‘withdraw without penalty’ once they have been notified At Risk. The expectation is that the Pre-service Teacher will continue at the placement until the period of the professional experience is complete or terminated by the professional experience academic coordinator. Pre-service Teachers who do not participate in the process will be deemed to have failed to meet requirements by the end of the period of professional experience (other than in cases of documented serious illness or misadventure). Pre-service Teachers are expected to attend EVERY DAY following identification of “At Risk of Failing the Professional Experience”. Additional placements will not be provided during the period of enrolment in the Professional Experience unless the initial placement is deemed “professionally unsuitable” for reasons not related to Pre-service Teacher poor performance. Outcome of the At Risk Process Allocation of a Grade At the completion of the full period of the professional experience a final result must be recommended for the professional experience. Pre-service Teachers who have made satisfactory progress and exhibit a satisfactory standard of performance at this point may be so designated on the relevant final report form. Pre-service Teachers who have failed to meet requirements at this point must be designated on the relevant final report form as UNSATISFACTORY. This result must be supported by the At Risk documentation. The University Advisor and Supervising Teacher will consult with regard to the final grade. In the event of agreement not being reached, the final decision is the responsibility of the university. Only in documented exceptional circumstances and at the discretion of the Head, School of Education, a Pre-service Teacher may be permitted to undertake up to 5 extra professional experience block days if it is considered by the University Advisor and the professional experience academic coordinator that the Pre-service Teacher is expected to achieve a satisfactory professional experience result in this time. 28
  • 29. Pre-service Teachers who receive an UNSATISFACTORY grade may re-enrol in the professional experience unit only when the unit is next on offer. Their academic transcript will record an “UNSATISFACTORY” grade, which is a fail grade. Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Satisfactory (No) Progress Requiring At Risk Committee of Advice Additional Meeting 3- AR1 (Yes) Support RAS1 Attended by Supervising Meeting 1. Teacher, Pre-service Regular Advisory Attended by Supervising Teacher, the additional Sessions Teacher, Pre-service Teacher, member (if possible) and an additional member (if University Advisor. AR1 possible school PE co- and LP2 completed ordinator) RAS1 and LP1 forms completed Meeting 4 – AR2 Attended by Supervising Satisfactory Progress Meeting 2 Teacher, Pre-service Outcome ticked on RAS1 Teacher, the additional Meeting attended by member (if possible) and Supervising Teacher, Pre- University Advisor. service Teacher and the additional member if possible If satisfactory, S Grade S Grade awarded awarded. If If satisfactory after meeting 2, unsatisfactory, U Grade return to Level 1 awarded If unsatisfactory, Pre-service Teacher notified “At Risk”, go to Level 3 Progression Across Professional Experience Units The procedures under this section apply to situations where a Pre-service Teacher’s professional experience placement has been terminated before completion, where the Pre-service Teacher has recorded a serious fail in a professional experience placement that has resulted in the good name of the university being prejudiced or where a Pre-service Teacher has failed consecutive placements. Where Pre-service Teachers are experiencing difficulties with their professional experience, the College of Arts level policies that have At Risk processes exist to intervene and to provide support and direction with a view to enhancing the prospects of a successful placement. When a Pre-service Teacher fails a professional experience placement the normal UWS progression and graduation rules generally apply. In a very small number of cases there may be:  A serious fail that has resulted in the good name of the university being prejudiced; or 29
  • 30.  A recommendation from the At Risk Committee of Advice or directly from the hosting school that the Pre-service Teacher be withdrawn prior to the completion of the placement. In such cases the professional experience academic coordinator may terminate the placement at this stage;  A Pre-service Teacher who fails two consecutive professional experience placements. In any of these circumstances, a process of review and remediation is activated and must be completed before the Pre-service Teacher is able to undertake a further professional experience unit. The Head, School of Education will review the reports from the school concerned and/or the Committee of Advice 1 and the final assessments in the case of consecutive failures and will request the Pre-service Teacher to attend an interview. Also attending the interview will be the relevant professional experience academic coordinator and another designated staff member of the university if considered desirable by the Head of School. The advice to the Pre-service Teacher will include a summary statement of the reasons for the review and remediation, including any relevant documentation and information about the UWS staff who will be attending. The advice will also indicate that the purpose of the meeting is fundamentally to examine what remedial action might be appropriate to enable the student to undertake another successful placement in the future. The Pre-service Teacher will be invited to bring with them a support person, being a fellow student, a student association welfare officer, or a UWS counsellor from the Student Support Services or other member of staff of the university. At the meeting the Head of School will outline to the Pre-service Teacher the extent and nature of the concerns associated with the professional experience and invite the student to respond to and comment on the issues raised. The Head of School will discuss with the student a range of personal and/or professional development activities and options that might be desirable. As far as possible the meeting shall be conducted in a manner that tries to achieve consensus on a program of development that will give the Pre-service Teacher the best possible opportunity to complete successfully a Professional Experience unit in the future. Following the meeting the Head of School will write to the Pre-service Teacher formally advising of any requirements that the Pre-service Teacher must undertake prior to being allowed to enrol in any further professional experience unit. That letter will stipulate the nature of any remedial action required, advise on the arrangements to be made, the time frame involved for the remediation program (up to a maximum limit of one year) and the nature of any reporting requirements. References Brookes, V., & Sikes, P. (1997). The Good Mentor Guide. Buckingham: Open University Press. 1 In circumstances where the placement is terminated before completion, the Committee of Advice will proceed with the submission of a grade for the final assessment which, in these cases would be U - Unsatisfactory 30
  • 31. Ganser, T. (2002). How Teachers compare the roles for cooperating Teacher and mentor [Electronic Version]. The Educational Forum 66 (4), 380-386. 31
  • 32. SECTION FIVE Professional, Ethical and Legal Responsibilities  Ethics  Child Protection  Confidentiality  Informed Consent  Conflict of Interest  Duty of Care  Physical Contact  Occupational Health & Safety and Risk Management  Prohibited Professional Experience Placements  Pre-service Teacher Insurance  Pre-service Teacher Conduct  School of Education Code of Ethics  Professional Experience Complaint Handling and Resolution Policy  Professional Experience Privacy Policy  Inclusive Language  Anti Discrimination Legislation in Australia 32
  • 33. Professional, Ethical and Legal Responsibilities In many cases the protocols in this section are based on UWS policies which can be found on the UWS website at www.uws.edu.au. The information is current at the time of writing, but policies are regularly updated by the University and it is the Pre- service Teacher’s responsibility to ensure that they are acting in accordance with the most up to date policy. Ethics Professional ethics is concerned with knowing, and doing, what is good, right and creates benefit according to what well-respected members of a particular profession would think. Guidelines for ethical action are available to Teachers in the form of value statements for the profession, or an employing body, and relevant codes of ethics and conduct as outlined to Pre-service Teachers at UWS specifically for each program. UWS Pre-service Teachers are expected to behave professionally and ethically at all times in accordance with all rules, policies and guidelines of UWS, School of Education and the values and philosophies of their specific programs. The UWS Code of Conduct should be used as a guide. Ethical communication and behaviour is expected in relation to university staff, all early childhood setting/school staff, and the families, children and young people with whom they come into contact throughout their professional experience associations. Conversations with parents should be polite and friendly, but the Pre-service Teacher must not assume the role of the Teacher, in the giving of advice, or entering into dialogue about confidential matters. Discretion and confidentiality must always be maintained. Supervising Teachers have a professional and ethical responsibility to the teaching profession to nurture the next generation of Teachers. Whilst Pre-service Teachers can benefit from many learning experiences and reflection about them, Supervising Teachers must not leave Pre-service Teachers alone with children or young people or expect them to assume the role of the Teacher, unsupervised, at any time. In the event that a Supervising Teacher (or School Professional Experience Coordinator) has significant concerns that a Pre-service Teacher’s actions are in breach of professional or ethical standards he or she should contact the school’s principal, the University Advisor or the professional experience academic coordinator (see front page of this handbook for contact details), follow mandatory reporting procedures and notify the relevant authorities as per mandatory reporting requirements if required. 33
  • 34. In the event that a Pre-service Teacher has significant concerns that he/she has been required to work in an illegal or unethical manner, or has witnessed illegal or unethical practice, he/she should follow mandatory reporting procedures and/or contact the school principal, his/her University Advisor, or the Professional Experience Academic Coordinator who will advise as to appropriate actions. Child Protection The School of Education has developed a Child Protection Protocol for all Pre- service Teachers, as well as casual and permanent staff. This protocol includes the signing of a Working With Children Check Declaration and includes a child protection training session. All participants in professional experience must act in accordance with the protocol (see Appendices), and follow mandatory reporting procedures as detailed below. Pre-service Teachers who do not complete UWS Child Protection training will not be permitted to undertake professional experience. Mandatory Reporting Pre-service Teachers are deemed to be employed while on professional placement and as such are deemed mandatory reporters in matters of child protection under the Children and Young Persons (Care and Protection) Act 1998. Under this legislation, Pre-service Teachers should follow the reporting procedures as outlined in their child protection training. These will differ according to the placement context. In NSW Department of Education and Training (DET) schools DET procedures should be followed. In other settings, Pre-service Teachers should familiarise themselves with the agency’s child protection procedures and follow these or notify the DOCS Helpline (13 2111). Support During a Reporting Process Reporting can be a stressful experience for Pre-service Teachers. They are reminded to refer back to their Child Protection Workshop materials for guidance. While Pre-service Teachers are not obliged to advise UWS of a report, if there are reasonable grounds for suspecting risk of harm to children including physical or sexual abuse or neglect, or psychological harm or domestic violence, and Pre- service Teachers are worried about the implications of making the report, or are pressured not to report, they are encouraged to seek the support of their professional experience academic co-ordinator or a respected professional mentor. Allegations Against a Pre-service Teacher Where a Pre-service Teacher is considered to pose a risk of harm to, or is alleged to have harmed a child or children while on professional experience placement, Supervising Teachers have an obligation to report their concerns. Reporting can be directly to the DOCS Helpline (13 2111) or according to school/centre policies, through a process of the report firstly going to the supervisor or principal. 34
  • 35. Process:  Report the concern to the appropriate person/agency  Arrange for the Pre-service Teacher to be removed from contact with children while the investigation takes place  Notify the UWS Professional Experience Office. Staff will notify the relevant professional experience academic coordinator  The Professional Experience Academic Coordinator will contact the Pre- service Teacher The NSW Ombudsman has the responsibility to ensure that effective systems are in place and to monitor local investigations within all government, and certain non- government agencies in NSW for preventing and responding to reportable allegations. This responsibility is outlined in Ombudsman Act 1974 and Child Protection Legislation Amendment Act 2003 and explained further in Child Protection in the Workplace. Responding to allegations against employees (June 2004). Under this legislation, schools are referred to as “agencies” and Pre-service Teachers are deemed to be “employees” as they are engaged to provide services to children and young people. Heads of agencies must notify the Ombudsman of reportable allegations. A local investigation may be required. Joint agency/UWS involvement in a local investigation is encouraged in cases where allegations are raised against UWS Pre-service Teachers. UWS will provide support for the Pre- service Teacher throughout and following the process. This does not in any way presuppose or prejudice the investigation or findings but considers the occupational health and safety of the Pre-service Teacher. Confidentiality It is essential that all Pre-service Teachers maintain confidentiality in respect to information acquired during the professional experience. Information regarding children, young people and their families should be regarded with the strictest confidence and should not be disclosed to any person other than those responsible for the supervision and direction of the Pre-service Teacher. Children’s surnames, addresses or other identifiers should not be used in any written documentation. Any identifying details such as name of the school, address, phone numbers, staff etc must be kept separate from professional experience documentation. In tutorial discussions, and conversations with friends and family, Pre-service Teachers should refrain from mentioning children, schools, and staff by name. Previous professional experience placements should not be discussed at other schools. 35
  • 36. Informed consent Post Graduate Pre-service Teachers are learning to work as Teachers and as such, are not normally conducting research when they gather information on children, young people and families for planning purposes. As such, their work is not subject to UWS Ethics Committee approval. However, Pre-service Teachers have an ethical obligation to seek the informed consent of children or young people (where appropriate) or their parents or guardians where they are seeking to gather personal or private information, or develop in-depth documentation for university assignments. Letters of informed consent must be distributed and stored confidentially. A sample letter is included in the Appendices. Conflict of Interest Conflict of interest may occur when a situation directly or indirectly compromises the performance of duties. Pre-service Teachers should not be advantaged or disadvantaged by close personal relationships with school staff or children/young people in professional experience settings. Pre-service Teachers should avoid conflict of interest during professional experience by disclosing information about any personal relationships in schools where they may undertake professional experience, when they are nominating a choice of schools on Pre-service Teacher survey forms. They should assess potential conflicts of interest in terms of the likelihood of being influenced in the performance of duties in a particular manner. If Pre-service Teachers become aware of such a situation, they should take appropriate steps to disclose the conflict to the relevant professional experience academic coordinator. A sexual or other close personal relationship between a Pre- service Teacher and a Supervising Teacher is likely to involve serious difficulties arising from the power disparity inherent in the staff/student relationship. In general, these relationships should be avoided. Pre-service Teachers in initial Teacher education courses must not undertake professional experience where they are employed as a casual Teacher or a staff member. A conflict of interest arises where payment is being made and a Pre- service Teacher is fulfilling the role of both a Pre-service Teacher and a paid employee. Pre-service Teachers should bring to the attention of the professional experience academic coordinator any conflict of interest that arises in this area. These guidelines are supported by the Independent Commission Against Corruption Act 1988 where the definition of corrupt conduct includes ‘any conduct of persons that adversely affect, or that could adversely affect, either directly or indirectly, the honest or impartial exercise of official functions by any public official [s.8(1)(a)]. Further information about conflict of interest may be found on the UWS Website under Policies and Procedures. 36
  • 37. Duty of Care The NSW Teacher’s Federation defines Duty of Care. The following adaptation of the definition can be used as a guide in all settings (http://www.nswtf.org.au/future_Teachers/legal_stuff.html ) In addition to providing appropriate teaching to meet the varying needs of children and young people, Pre-service Teachers, like all teachers, have "a duty of care". This situation means that as a responsible adult they have a legal responsibility for the safety and wellbeing of those children and young people. To fulfil this legal responsibility, Pre-service Teachers must always act in a manner that a court of law would consider "reasonable" in the circumstances. What is considered "reasonable" would be influenced by the:  number of the children or young people in their care;  age and ability of the children or young people;  activity taking place;  environment in which the activity takes place. Pre-service Teachers must ensure that they are familiar with the school's and the Department of Education and Training's (DET) and Department of Community Services’ (DOCs) procedures and always work within them. Accidents can still happen, even to the most experienced of teachers and in the best regulated classrooms. However, Pre-service Teachers will not have breached their duty of care unless they can be proved to have been negligent. Negligence is:  an action which could reasonably have been expected to contribute, directly or indirectly, to causing harm to a child or young person;  a failure to take action to prevent reasonably foreseeable harm to a child or young person. Physical Contact All physical interactions with children/young people should be appropriate, and conducted under the direct supervision of an employee of the school (e.g. Supervising Teacher). The Pre-service Teacher must familiarise him/herself with the child protection and behaviour policies of the school and under no circumstances will a Pre-service Teacher ever engage in physical punishment or inappropriate behaviour management (physical or emotional) of a child. UWS Pre- service Teachers must always act in accordance with relevant state and employer regulations that govern professional experience schools. Unnecessary physical contact with children and young people should be avoided as even the most innocent of actions can be misconstrued. This does not mean that there should be no touching. In the early childhood years, in particular, warm and appropriate interactions, physical and verbal and non-verbal, are crucial to healthy 37
  • 38. development and wellbeing. Also, reasonable physical restraint may be used if the actions of children/young people are likely to be harmful to themselves or to others, or result in damage to property, including their own. Following any accident or incident, no matter how trivial it may seem at the time, a report should be made to your Supervising Teacher and University Advisor without delay. In some circumstances a report form will need to be completed. See the NSW Teachers Federation's Welfare Leaflet. Occupational Health and Safety and Risk Management Professional Experience involves working in schools in the role of the Teacher. Schools are expected to observe appropriate Occupational Health and Safety considerations and Pre-service Teachers have a responsibility to ensure they can undertake the physical and mental expectations of the job. Expectations vary among programs and settings and Pre-service Teachers must familiarise themselves with what they will be expected to do, which may involve such risks as lifting, being exposed to infection, considerable writing or typing and travel to appropriate settings. Pre-service Teachers are also advised to observe appropriate hygiene and safety practices to protect themselves and the children and young people with whom they work. Pre-service Teachers who are, or may become, pregnant before or during their placement are strongly advised to consult their doctor before undertaking professional experience. Most types of schools have their own employment policy regarding staff who are pregnant. In DET schools, a risk assessment will be undertaken to ensure the safety of the Pre-service Teacher and their unborn baby. Pre-service Teachers who wish to continue with their professional experience during the latter stages of pregnancy need to discuss the matter with the Professional Experience Academic Co-ordinator. If Pre-service Teachers have concerns as to their physical or mental capacity to undertake the work of a teacher, advice and support may be sought from the UWS Disability Service or the UWS Equity and Diversity Unit. Information will be treated with utmost confidentiality (see UWS website). Pre-service Teachers who apply to undertake a professional experience unit in the School of Education must take the responsibility for seeking out any support they may need, and an application for professional experience will be regarded as the Pre-service Teacher’s verification that they are physically and mentally prepared for the job. For further information on UWS Occupational Health & Safety policy, please refer to the UWS website. Pre-service Teachers who require reasonable effort for accommodation for a disability must register with the UWS Disability Service before special consideration is reviewed. Prohibited Professional Experience Placements Pre-service Teachers will not be placed for professional experience in settings such as Juvenile Justice and Correctional Centres. Pre-service Teachers wishing to 38
  • 39. attend government health facilities need to comply with NSW Health policy on immunisation. As Pre-service Teachers do not comply with existing legislation, they are not permitted to attend overnight camps. Pre-service Teacher Insurance All UWS Pre-service Teachers are covered for personal accident/injury and public liability while engaged in course related activities (refer to the UWS website). This arrangement includes professional experience field/observation visits and blocks. Pre-service Teachers requiring confirmation of insurance cover Letters of indemnity required by Pre-service Teachers (confirming that they have appropriate insurance cover) can be requested by contacting the Professional Experience Office on (02) 47360262. Pre-service Teachers undertaking an activity (e.g. work experience) not required by their course/unit will still be covered, provided that the activity is approved in writing from the Head of Program and is related to the Pre-service Teacher’s course of study. More details about the nature and extent of cover for Pre-service Teachers can be obtained from the UWS website http://www.uws.edu.au/finance_office/finance/student_insurances or by contacting the UWS Accountant, Tax and Insurance on (02) 4570 1217. In the event of an accident Pre-service Teachers who are involved in an accident travelling to or from their professional experience or are injured during professional experience should initially seek appropriate medical care and follow the reporting procedures in their school. The UWS Finance’s Office manages claims against the Student Personal Accident and Injury policy. Pre-service Teachers with claims should, in the first instance, contact the UWS Accountant, Tax and Insurance on (02) 4570 1217. Pre-service Teachers should not delay lodging claims as this might jeopardise any settlement to which they may be entitled. Benefits provided by the policy will have an excess deducted from any settlements to which the Pre-service Teacher may receive. As Pre-service Teachers are the insured persons of this policy, it is the Pre-service Teacher who bears the excess. Potential liability claims against the university or Pre-service Teacher must be reported to the Professional Experience Office. Potential claims will arise where a Pre-service Teacher has been negligent resulting in injury, loss or damage. The School of Education must then provide full details to the Director of Finance. Failure to report potential claims may result in the actual claim being rejected by the university's insurer. 39
  • 40. Pre-service Teacher Conduct The highest standard of conduct is expected of Pre-service Teachers at all times. Pre-service Teachers’ conduct during professional experience is guided by three policies: 1. College of Arts Professional Experience Reference Group’s Principles of Ethical and Professional Behaviour Policy All UWS Teacher Education Programs have adopted, through the Professional Experience Reference Group of the university and field representatives, the Principles of Ethical and Professional Behaviour Policy. See appendices. 2. Academic Misconduct The UWS Academic Misconduct policy covers cheating, plagiarism and collusion. It can be found on the UWS website http://policies.uws.edu.au/view.current.php?id=00051 3. Non-Academic Misconduct The following points have been drawn from the policy as being the most applicable during professional experience. Pre-service Teachers should refer to the UWS website http://policies.uws.edu.au/view.current.php?id=00104 Non-Academic Misconduct includes, but is not limited to:  contravention of UWS Act, By-Laws, Rules or Policies;  behaves in a manner that prejudices the good name or academic standing of the University;  harasses, vilifies, abuses, threatens, assaults or endangers staff, students or other members of the University’s community directly or by other means of communication;  fails to follow reasonable directions of an employee of the University;  alters or falsifies or fabricates any document or record that the University requires of the student (e.g. medical certificate or other supporting documentation);  divulges confidential or personal information relating to any University matter, staff member or student in circumstances where there is no reasonable or lawful excuse for doing so;  behaves inappropriately in an activity (eg In the virtual and physical environments such as e-learning sites, face to face classes, meetings), facility in or under the control or supervision of the University or a recognised University student association;  knowingly provides false or misleading information to staff of the University; or  fails to comply with a penalty imposed or outcome agreed to under this or other policies of the University. 40
  • 41. Code of Ethics for Staff and Students of the School of Education Our interaction with others will always be conducted with: Respect Care Integrity Diligence Openness These are demonstrated by:  Treating each other with respect  Being loyal to and supportive of each other  Working cooperatively and sustainably within our learning communities  Sharing expertise and knowledge with each other  Supporting and assisting each other to raise the status of the teaching profession  Acknowledging personal responsibility for learning  Respecting the right to privacy and confidentiality  Helping others learn to interact effectively and in doing so balance their own rights, needs and feelings with those of community members (Adapted from Groundwater-Smith, Ewing, & Le Cornu, 2006) Professional Experience Complaint Handling and Resolution Policy Pre-service Teachers should make themselves fully aware of the University’s Complaint Handling and Resolution Policy. It can be found on the UWS website by clicking onto http://policies.uws.edu.au/view.current.php?id=00098 Professional Experience Privacy Policy The following are excerpts from the University Privacy Policy Guideline. Pre-service Teachers should make themselves familiar with the complete document on the UWS website - http://policies.uws.edu.au/view.current.php?id=00108 The University of Western Sydney is committed to fair personal and health information handling practices in its educational, research, engagement, and associated administrative procedures and activities. In protecting the privacy of personal and health information entrusted to it, the University will meet its statutory requirements under the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998 (PPIPA) and the Health Records and Information Privacy Act 2002 (HRIPA). In particular the University will reference its practices and activities against the Information Protection Principles (IPPs), and the Health Privacy Principles (HPPs) contained in those Acts. All staff and functional units of the University have an obligation, in their day to day practices, to adhere to and implement the privacy principles and practices established by legislation and given detailed expression in this and other privacy related policies and guidelines and the UWS Privacy Management Plan . 41
  • 42. In establishing a policy and administrative framework to protect the privacy of personal information entrusted to the University it is important to understand what constitutes personal information as defined in the legislation (PPIPA): "In this Act, personal information means information or an opinion (including information or an opinion forming part of a database and whether or not recorded in a material form) about an individual whose identity is apparent or can reasonably be ascertained from the information or opinion” In the University context, personal information includes material such as: contact details - addresses, telephone numbers, email addresses. reference numbers - tax file numbers, passport numbers, bank account numbers, photographic images, next of kin etc. Pre-service Teachers should make themselves familiar with the UWS Privacy Management Plan at http://policies.uws.edu.au/download.php?id=100 . Information about University Pre-service Teachers may be disclosed without the consent of the Pre-service Teacher to university officials or committees deemed to have a legitimate educational interest. Information on University Pre-service Teachers (other than as specified in policy) will be released to third parties only at the written request of the student. This restriction applies to requests from parents, spouses, DET, credit bureaus and police. All staff and functional units of the University have an obligation, in their day to day practices, to adhere to and implement the privacy principles and practices established by legislation and given detailed expression in this and other privacy related policies and guidelines and the UWS Privacy Management Plan. Inclusive Language The UWS's Equal Opportunity Policy Statement provides a commitment to equal opportunity for all staff and students regardless of sex, pregnancy, race, marital status, homosexuality, age, family responsibilities, disability, transgender, political conviction or religious belief. As such UWS is committed to the examination of all its policies and practices to ensure the elimination of discrimination and harassment. The elimination of non-inclusive and discriminatory language is necessary for achieving equal opportunity for staff and students. Discriminatory language is both a symptom of, and a contributor to, the unequal social status of women, people with disabilities and people from various ethnic and racial backgrounds. Language is a major vehicle for the expression of prejudice or discrimination. Thus language can both reflect and shape social reality. UWS supports the use of inclusive, non- discriminatory language in all official documents and promotes its use in classrooms, meetings and other settings within the University. 42
  • 43. Anti Discrimination Legislation in Australia Australia's commitment to eliminating discrimination has been manifested in a number of ways, including legislation at the federal level, with the Racial Discrimination Act 1975, the Sex Discrimination Act 1984, the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Act 1986, the Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Act 1999 and the Disability Discrimination Act 1992, and at the state level, with the New South Wales Anti-Discrimination Act 1977. The Anti-Discrimination Act 1977 covers discrimination on the grounds of sex, homosexuality, marital status, race, physical and Intellectual disability, transgender and age. Vilification amendments to the Anti- Discrimination Act (1977) provide legal sanction on the grounds of homosexuality, race, transgender or HIV/AIDS status by banning the expression of hatred, serious contempt and severe ridicule in a wide range of spoken and written forms. Different Forms of Discriminatory Language a) Extra-Visibility or Emphasis on Difference In many contexts it is quite unnecessary to mention a person's sex, race, ethnic background or disability. For members of minority groups these characteristics are often mentioned. This type of specification may result in overemphasis on a particular characteristic, thus creating the impression that the person referred to is somehow an oddity. b) Stereotyping A stereotype is a generalised and relatively fixed image of a person or persons belonging to a particular group. This image is formed by isolating or exaggerating certain features - physical, intellectual, cultural, occupational, personal, and so on - which seem to characterise the group. Stereotypes are discriminatory in that they take away a person's individuality. Although they may reflect elements of truth, these are usually misinterpreted or inaccurate owing to oversimplification. The status of minority groups in society is often adversely influenced by prevailing stereotypes of them. c) Derogatory Labelling The discriminatory nature of derogatory labels used to describe members of minority groups is often obvious. However, derogatory labels are still commonly used, and must be avoided. d) Imposed Labelling A characteristic often shared by minority groups is their lack of power to define themselves. Often the names and labels by which they are known, whether derogatory or not, have been imposed on them. Imposed labelling may be inaccurate in various ways and may also be alienating for the groups it supposedly describes. 43
  • 44. Language and Specific Groups a) Language, Sex and Gender Non-sexist language is to ensure a balanced and fair representation of men and women in language not to 'de-sex' language. Non-sexist language increases clarity in language use by removing ambiguities, and increases accuracy by avoiding false assumptions about the nature and roles of women and men in society. Sexist language is language that expresses bias in favour of one sex and thus discriminates against the other. In general, the bias is in favour of men and against women. Language that discriminates against women by not adequately reflecting their roles, status and presence in society is sexist. b) Language and Disability The portrayal of people with disabilities has been fraught with contradictions because of ambivalent attitudes towards disability. Because people are often uncomfortable or embarrassed about disability, many euphemisms have been created to describe disability and people with disabilities. Discriminatory language in relation to the portrayal of people with disabilities is characterised by derogatory labelling, by depersonalising, by stereotyping and by emphasising the disability rather than the person. c) Language, Race and Ethnicity Australia's population is comprised of people from different ethnic and racial backgrounds, some of whom are Indigenous to Australia. Language plays a major role in expressing group relations and group conflicts. Ethnic and racial labels, names and expressions are created and used to portray certain groups as inferior or superior to others. Non-discriminatory language in relation to race and ethnicity aims to recognise and present the diversity of Australia's population in positive ways. d) Language and Indigenous Australians An Indigenous Australian is an Aboriginal person or Torres Strait Islander, who identifies as such, is of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent and is recognised as such by the community. The separate linguistic and cultural identity of the Indigenous people of the Torres Strait Islands must be recognised. The preferred term is Torres Strait Islander. The linguistic portrayal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people has been mainly negative and stereotypical. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are most often described in racial group terms, rarely as individuals with personal names. 'Aboriginals' was often used as a noun to describe the Indigenous people of Australia instead of its use as an adjective which is acceptable, eg. the Aboriginal Education Unit, the Aboriginal people of Australia, Aboriginal employees/students. Wherever possible an Aboriginal person or group's preference of title should be used. If in doubt, ask the person or group. At UWS consultation with either the staff 44