Harv Gr Eng Bioenergy Sustain Forest Jan 2008 Mpm

826 views

Published on

Bioenergy can be compatible with sustainable forestry when developed with mutual benefits

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
826
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
15
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
19
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Harv Gr Eng Bioenergy Sustain Forest Jan 2008 Mpm

  1. 1. Sustainability and Bioenergy from Forests Marcia Patton-Mallory, PhD Biomass and Bioenergy Coordinator, US Forest Service Harvesting Green Energy Conference Portland, OR – January 29, 2008
  2. 2. Overview • Sustainability: Forests, Climate Change and Biomass • Opportunities • Challenges
  3. 3. Sustainability “…the capacity to meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs” (Brundtland Commission, 1987)
  4. 4. Sustainability’s Triple Bottom-Line Interconnected and integrated Economy Environment Economy Society Environment Society (Maureen Hart, Sustainable Measures)
  5. 5. Forest Service Mission The mission of the Forest Service is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the Nation’s forests and grasslands to meet the needs of present and future generations.
  6. 6. Renewable Energy • Solar and Wind Resources on Forests and Grasslands • Hydroelectric and Geothermal Energy • Bioenergy- heat, power, and biofuels with associated biobased products
  7. 7. Source: American Solar Energy Society. 2007. http://www.ases.org/climatechange/climate_change.pdf
  8. 8. Opportunities
  9. 9. U.S. Energy Consumption Total = 6.2 Quadrillion Btu − 2% Wind Domestic Natural Gas 21% Domestic Petroleum − 45% Hydroelectric 9% Domestic Coal 22% − 5% Geothermal Domestic Renewable Energy 6% Domestic Nuclear − 47% Biomass Electric 8% − 1% Solar All Imports 34% 72% of biomass is wood based
  10. 10. Managing our lands for energy, food and fiber
  11. 11. U.S. Carbon Emissions Displacement Potential from Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by 2030 Source: American Solar Energy Society. 2007. http://www.ases.org/climatechange/climate_change.pdf
  12. 12. Total US Green House Gas Annual Emissions by Sector (EPA, 2003) 40 35 30 25 forests and wood products Percent CO2 Eq. 20 sequester 11% US GHG emissions annually 15 10 5 0 try ts n s s re al r al te we oil tio ree uc nti ltu rci us as -5 S rt a Po od nT e cu me I nd W sid Ag po Pr ri ic an ba m Ag Re ctr ns od Co rb Ur -10 Tra Ele Wo dUe d fill an nd -15 ts La res Fo Sectors
  13. 13. Renewable Portfolio Standards MN: 25% by 2025 ME: 30% by 2000 VT: RE meets load 10% by 2017 - new RE (Xcel: 30% by 2020) growth by 2012 *WA: 15% by 2020 ☼ NH: 23.8% in 2025 ND: 10% by 2015 WI: requirement varies by MA: 4% by 2009 + utility; 10% by 2015 goal MT: 15% by 2015 1% annual increase OR: 25% by 2025 (large utilities) RI: 16% by 2020 5% - 10% by 2025 (smaller utilities) CT: 23% by 2020 IA: 105 MW ☼ NY: 24% by 2013 ☼ *NV: 20% by 2015 ☼ CO: 20% by 2020 (IOUs) IL: 25% by 2025 ☼ NJ: 22.5% by 2021 *10% by 2020 (co-ops & large munis) CA: 20% by 2010 ☼ PA: 18%¹ by 2020 MO: 11% by 2020 ☼ MD: 9.5% in 2022 ☼ NC: 12.5% by 2021 (IOUs) ☼ *DE: 20% by 2019 ☼ AZ: 15% by 2025 10% by 2018 (co-ops & munis) ☼ DC: 11% by 2022 ☼ NM: 20% by 2020 (IOUs) *VA: 12% by 2022 10% by 2020 (co-ops) TX: 5,880 MW by 2015 State RPS HI: 20% by 2020 State Goal ☼ Minimum solar or customer-sited RE requirement * Increased credit for solar or customer-sited RE ¹PA: 8% Tier I / 10% Tier II (includes non-renewables) (Source: Database of State Incentives for Renewable Energy. 2007. “Renewables Portfolio Standards.” NC State University. NC Solar Center. Available online at: http://www.dsireusa.org/documents/summarymaps/RPS_Map.ppt)
  14. 14. Biomass Power Plants
  15. 15. WGA Biopower Assessment WGA Biomass Task Force- 2006
  16. 16. WGA Strategic Development of Bioenergy in the Western US Draft Preliminary Results 1/08
  17. 17. Climate Change Mitigation Pew Center on Global Climate Change 2007
  18. 18. Forest Service and Climate Change Climate Change Framework Adaptation Mitigation (includes reducing our carbon footprint) Bioproducts Policy Tools “I propose two forest related goals: The first goal would be to sustain and strengthen the role of America’s forests as a net carbon sink. The second goal would be to increase the amount of America’s energy that comes from forests. ” Chief Gail Kimball- Climate Change, Kids and Forests, Sept 7, 2007
  19. 19. Net Energy and Net GHG Emissions Units of biofuel Reduction in GHG emissions to produced from 1 unit of make ethanol compared to fossil fuel gasoline made from fossil fuel 1.3 22% Corn to ethanol 8 56% Sugar Cane to ethanol 2.5 69% Soybean to biodiesel Up to 36 91% Wood/Grass to ethanol Data Sources (adapted from C.Mater, Mater Engineering) •Corn to ethanol data: US DOE; EPS; Renewable Fuel's Association; Energy Future Coalition; Worldwatch Institute •Cane to ethanol data: USDOE; Worldwatch Institute; Iowa State University •Soy to biodiesel data: USDOE; EPA; Worldwatch Institute; •Woody/grass biomass to ethanol: USDOE; EPA; WorldWatch Institute
  20. 20. Challenges
  21. 21. Woody Biomass Potential 368 million tons annually Billion Ton Report
  22. 22. Public vs Private Forests Land Ownership Matters… 9% federal 58% federal
  23. 23. Biomass Utilization Pathways USES Conversion Forest Fuels: Processes Biomass − Renewable Diesel − Ethanol Feedstock Electricity and Heat – Manufacturing - Forest Residues – Co-firing Biobased Products - Hazardous Fuel – Combustion – Composites Treatments – Gasification – Specialty Products - Short Rotation – Enzymatic Fermentation – New Products Woody Crops – Chemicals – Gas/liquid Fermentation - Wood Waste – Traditional Products – Acid Hydrolysis/Fermentation
  24. 24. Potentially Available Forest Resource 70 60 20 15 50 7 Millon dry tonnes per year 15 40 10 14 30 47 44 42 25 20 32 29 7 10 10 8 7 0 Fuelwood Logging Residue Other Removal Residue (Other Forestland) (Forest Products) (Forest Products) Fuel Treatments Urban Wood Residue Wood Residues Pulping Liquors Fuel Treatments (Timberland) Growth Unexploited Existing Use Source: DOE and USDA “Billion Ton Report” May 2005 http://www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/publications.html
  25. 25. Sustainability and Communities Biobased Products and Bioenergy air culture and quality tradition watershed protection purchasing power tree agricultural generation protection zoning recycling pest programs management ecoindustrial fuel parks choice incentive programs materials heat power Source: James and Lahti, 2004, The Natural Step for Communities
  26. 26. Restoring Fire Adapted Forest Ecosystems RA FRCC http://www.landfire.gov/rapid_assessment.php
  27. 27. Forest Insect and Disease Risk
  28. 28. Agricultural and Wood Residues
  29. 29. Sustainability and Bioenergy • Forest Resource Issues • National Policy • State Policy • Public Interest • Sustainability- Energy, Environment, Economy Effective biomass policy is essential to achieving sustainable forests in the United States
  30. 30. Thank you! Contact Information: (970) 295-5947 mpattonmallory@fs.fed.us For more information, please visit: http://www.fs.fed.us/woodybiomass

×