Effects Of Massage On General Health And Injuries

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Effects of Massage Therapy on General Health and Wellness

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Effects Of Massage On General Health And Injuries

  1. 1. Effects of Massage on General Health and Injuries<br />Matthew Patjawee<br />KIN 100W<br />May 6, 2009<br />
  2. 2. <ul><li>According to Merriam Webster’s Dictionary: </li></ul>Massage is “ The manipulation of tissues (as by rubbing, kneading, or tapping) with the hand or an instrument for therapeutic purposes.” <br />What is Massage?<br />
  3. 3. <ul><li>Started as early as 3000 BC.
  4. 4. Early written evidence of massage found in:
  5. 5. China: Chinese books -“ The Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine”, and “ Cong-Fu of the Tao-Tse”.
  6. 6. Egypt: Paintings on the walls of the tombs.
  7. 7. United States started in mid 1800’s
  8. 8. Slowed in 1930’s and 1940’s
  9. 9. Picked up again in 1970’s</li></ul>History of Massage<br />
  10. 10. <ul><li>Relieve stress
  11. 11. Encourage Relaxation
  12. 12. Promote Better Sleep
  13. 13. Improve Circulation
  14. 14. Improves Posture
  15. 15. Helps with Pain
  16. 16. Improves Range of Motion and Flexibility
  17. 17. Relieves Tension Headaches
  18. 18. Enhances Post Operative Rehabilitation
  19. 19. Psychological </li></ul>Benefits of Massage<br />
  20. 20. <ul><li>Body temperature over 100 degrees or feeling unwell.
  21. 21. Acute traumas including: Open wounds, recent bruising, muscle tears, contusions and burns.
  22. 22. Acute sprains or strains.
  23. 23. Areas of active inflammation.
  24. 24. Sites where fractures have failed to heal.
  25. 25. Areas with skin conditions.
  26. 26. Thrombophlebitis</li></ul>Contraindications for Massage<br />
  27. 27. <ul><li>Effleurage
  28. 28. Petrissage
  29. 29. Friction
  30. 30. Tapotement</li></ul>Types of Massages<br />
  31. 31. <ul><li>Categorized as both superficial and deep.
  32. 32. Effleurage is the stroking of the skin:
  33. 33. Use the palm of the hand or knuckles to stimulate deep tissues.
  34. 34. Use the finger pads to stimulate sensory nerves.
  35. 35. Superficial stroking – may follow the direction of the underlying muscles but does not move it.
  36. 36. Deep stroking – requires more pressure to elongate muscle fiber and stretch fascia. </li></ul>Effleurage<br />
  37. 37. <ul><li>Lifting, kneading, and rolling of the skin, tissue, and muscle with the fingers or hand.
  38. 38. Frees adhesions by stretching and separating muscle fiber, fascia, and scar tissue.
  39. 39. Milks the muscle of wastes.
  40. 40. Assists is venous return.</li></ul>Petrissage<br />
  41. 41. <ul><li>Application of pressure in a circular motion.
  42. 42. Purpose is to increase inflammatory response to progress the healing process.
  43. 43. Mobilizes muscle fibers and separates adhesions in muscles, tendon fibers, or scar tissue.
  44. 44. 2 types:
  45. 45. Circular – applied with thumbs, effective in treatment of muscle spasm and trigger points.
  46. 46. Transverse – trigger points and tendonitis. </li></ul>Friction<br />
  47. 47. <ul><li>Gentle tapping or pounding of the skin.
  48. 48. Used to increase circulation, blood flow and stimulate peripheral nerve endings.
  49. 49. Most common form is “hacking” – Uses ulnar side of the wrist.
  50. 50. Other forms are cupping and pincement. </li></ul>Tapotement<br />
  51. 51. <ul><li>Effects of massage on Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS)
  52. 52. Zainuddin, Newton, and Sacco
  53. 53. Purpose: Examine the effects of massage on DOMS, muscle strength, Range of motion (ROM) using arm to arm comparison model.
  54. 54. Goal: To see whether massage is effective in alleviating DOMS and enhancing recovery of muscle function after eccentric exercise.</li></ul>Study<br />
  55. 55. <ul><li>Subjects: 10 healthy subjects (5 men and 5 women) with no history of upper arm injury and no experience in resistance training.
  56. 56. Experiment used: Arm to arm comparison- one arm control and one arm assigned a treatment.
  57. 57. Exercises: 10 sets of 6 maximal eccentric contractions with 3 minutes rest in between sets.
  58. 58. Massage: 10 minute sports massage by a qualified massage therapist 3 hours post exercise.
  59. 59. Consisted of effleurage, petrissage, and friction.</li></ul>Methods<br />
  60. 60. <ul><li>Muscle Soreness developed with peak soreness reported 1 to 3 days post exercise.
  61. 61. Massage resulted in 20 -40% decrease in severity of soreness and decrease in swelling.
  62. 62. Demonstration of Massage Techniques</li></ul>Results and Conclusion<br />
  63. 63. <ul><li>Trigger Point
  64. 64. Sweedish
  65. 65. Deep Tissue
  66. 66. Sports
  67. 67. Reflexology
  68. 68. Cranial Sacral </li></ul>810 Clinics Nationwide<br />Ask for Joe Phan (Manager), he’ll hook you up!<br />Massage Envy<br />
  69. 69. <ul><li>Best, T., Hunter, R., Wilcox, A., & Haq, F. (2008). Effectiveness of sports massage for recovery
  70. 70. of skeletal muscle from strenuous exercise. Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine, 18(5),
  71. 71. 446-460. Retrieved April 18, 2009, from Academic Search Premier database.
  72. 72. DeLeo, J.A. (2006). Basic science of pain. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated,
  73. 73. 88(2), 58-62. Retrieved April 20, 2009, from Academic Search Premier database.
  74. 74. Diego, M.A., Field, T., Hernandez-Reif, M., Hart, S., Brucker, B., Field, T., & Burman, I.
  75. 75. (2002). Spinal cord patients benefit from massage therapy. Intern J. Neuroscience, 112,
  76. 76. 133-142. Retrieved April 19, 2009, from Academic Search Premier database.
  77. 77. Gazzillo, L.M., & Middlemas, D.A. (2001). Therapeutic massage techniques for three common
  78. 78. injuries. Human Kinetics, 6(3), 5-9. Retrieved April 19, 2009, from Academic Search
  79. 79. Premier database.
  80. 80. Goodwin, J.E., Glaister, M., Howatson, G., Locket, R.A. & McInnes, G. (2007). Effect of
  81. 81. preperformance lower-limb massage on thirty-meter sprint running. Journal of Strength
  82. 82. and Conditioning Research, 21(4), 1028-1031. Retrieved April 19, 2009, from Academic
  83. 83. Search Premier database. </li></ul>References<br />
  84. 84. <ul><li>Horowitz, S. (2007). Evidence-based indications for therapeutic massage. Alternative &
  85. 85. Complementary Therapies.
  86. 86. Howatson, G., & Someren, K.A. (2008). The prevention and treatment of exercise-induced
  87. 87. muscle damage. Sports Med, 38(6), 483-503. Retrieved April 19, 2009, from Academic
  88. 88. Search Premier database.
  89. 89. Lally, S., & Meyers, M.S. (1990). Massage: What it can do for you. Prevention, 40(12), 56-122.
  90. 90. Retrieved April 19, 2009, from Academic Search Premier database.
  91. 91. MedicineNet.(2009). Massage Therapy. Web site: http://www.medicinenet.com/massage_therapy/page3.htm#who
  92. 92. Tessier, D.G. (2005). Sports massage: An overview. Therapeutic Modalities, 10(5) 67-69.
  93. 93. Retrieved April 19, 2009, from Academic Search Premier database.
  94. 94. Weerapong, P., Hume, P., & Kolt, G.S. (2005). The mechanisms of massage and effects on
  95. 95. performance, muscle recovery and injury prevention. Sports Med, 35(3), 235-256.
  96. 96. Retrieved April 19, 2009, from Academic Search Premier database.
  97. 97. Starkey, C. (2004). Therapeutic modalities. Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Company.
  98. 98. Zainuddin, Z., Newton, M., Sacco, P., & Nosaka, K. (2005). Effects of massage on delayed-onset
  99. 99. muscle soreness, swelling, and recovery of muscle function. Journal of Athletic Training,
  100. 100. 40(3), 174-180. Retrieved April 19, 2009, from Academic Search Premier.</li></ul>References<br />
  101. 101. Questions?<br />

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