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Open educational practices and learning design: The role of educational developers in supporting open education

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While an official definition for open educational practices is still emerging, from a learning design perspective these may be considered teaching and learning practices where openness is enacted within all aspects of instructional practice; including the design of learning outcomes, the selection of teaching resources, and the planning of activities and assessment. (Paskevicius, 2017). Open educational practices are teaching and learning designs that take advantages of the affordances of open educational resources, challenge students to learn more openly, engage our communities, and make our professional practice more accessible. A number of scholars have advocated for open practices: in supporting student success through increased access to educational resources (Mulder, 2011; Carey, Davis, Ferreras, & Porter, 2015); to support faculty engagement with educational developers in the co-creation of reusable and adaptable courseware (Conole & Weller, 2008; DeVries &Harrison, 2016); through the experimentation and reflection of the practice of teaching in the open (Veletsianos, 2013; Cronin, 2017); and in fostering learning communities across institutions (Petrides, Jimes, Middleton-Detzner, Walling, & Weiss, 2011). This session will focus on the stakeholder role of the educational developer, whose consultative work may support more open practices to address institutional goals, missions, and objectives.

Educational developers are well positioned to support change by infusing professional development with open practices at the departmental, program, and course level. Open educational practices may be situated as a lens to support these change initiatives and provide new conceptualisations of teaching and learning (Bossu, & Fountain, 2015). In this research presentation I'll present the findings from a literature review of open educational practices in the context of learning design and engage participants in thinking about how to integrate “open" into learning outcomes, teaching resources, pedagogy, and assessment.

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Open educational practices and learning design: The role of educational developers in supporting open education

  1. 1. Open educational practices and learning design: The role of educational developers in supporting open education Michael Paskevicius Ph.D. Candidate
  2. 2. Goals for the session • Consider the educational developers role of change agent in advancing openness in education • Collect a set of strategies for supporting open educational practices in the development of learning outcomes, teaching strategies, educational materials, and assessment
  3. 3. What comes to mind when you think of open education?
  4. 4. Retain • Make and maintain copies Reuse • Use in a wide range of ways Revise • Adapt, modify, and improve Remix • Combine with other resources and ideas Redistribute • Share with others (Wiley, 2018)
  5. 5. “open education is not limited to just open educational resources. It also draws upon open technologies that facilitate collaborative, flexible learning and the open sharing of teaching practices that empower educators to benefit from the best ideas of their colleagues. It may also grow to include new approaches to assessment, accreditation and collaborative learning” The Cape Town Open Education Declaration, 2007
  6. 6. How can educational developers support open educational practices?
  7. 7. Teaching & Learning Activities Teaching & Learning Resources Learning Outcomes Assessment & Evaluation Adapted from Biggs & Tang, 2011
  8. 8. Teaching & Learning Activities Teaching & Learning Resources Learning Outcomes Assessment & Evaluation Accessible, clear, transparent, expansive, and student-centred learning outcomes Accessible, adaptable, shared, and collaborative resources Student engaged as producer, collaborator, and digitally literate contributor to OEP Exposed, collaborative, and collectively improved teaching and learning activities Paskevicius, M. (2017). Conceptualizing Open Educational Practices through the Lens of Constructive Alignment. Open Praxis, 9(2), 125. https://doi.org/10.5944/openpraxis.9.2.519
  9. 9. • Assessment design consultations • Course/assignment redesign programs • Communities of practice • Peer observations • Teaching circles • Awareness raising for OER • Encouraging faculty contributions • Consultations • Syllabi review • Curriculum mapping
  10. 10. Could there be an emergent role of “open” educational developer?
  11. 11. https://wordpress.viu.ca/enhancingpersonalizedlearning #nondisposableviu
  12. 12. Open Case Studies http://bit.ly/OpenCaseStudies Peer review and collaborative writing “raises the bar for them. If they’re writing just for me, and I don’t take this personally, they don’t put in sometimes quite as much effort as if their peers are going to read what they wrote. So it raises for some of them their level of engagement and motivation. I created a non-disposable visual portfolio for students to document and follow their progress as well as observe and contribute feedback to their peers. The goal was also to complete the course with a set of assignments that showcases their learning and outcomes in an accessible and visually appealing manner. Surprisingly user engagement was quite active with parents, friends, and people from other countries commenting on posts and starting interesting discussions. I think the students found that really rewarding that it went beyond the needs of meeting a course requirement.
  13. 13. What strategies are you using to support open education at your institution? http://bit.ly/EdDevOpen
  14. 14. Prepared by: Michael Paskevicius Learning Technologies Application Developer Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning michael.paskevicus@viu.ca Follow me: http://twitter.com/mpaskevi Portfolio: http://michaelpaskevicius.com/ Presentations: http://www.slideshare.net/mpaskevi This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 Please feel free to provide feedback on the session at: http://bit.ly/EdDevOpen
  15. 15. References Biggs, J., & Tang, C. (2011). Teaching for Quality Learning at University (4 edition). Maidenhead: Open University Press. The Cape Town Open Education Declaration (2007). Retrieved from http://www.capetowndeclaration.org/read-the-declaration Chism, N. V. N. (1998). The Role of Educational Developers in Institutional Change: From the Basement Office to the Front Office. To Improve the Academy, 17(1), 141–153. Hood, N., & Littlejohn, A. (2017). Knowledge Typologies for Professional Learning: Educators’ (re)generation of Knowledge When Learning Open Educational Practice. Educational Technology Research and Development, 1–22. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11423-017-9536-z Iiyoshi, T., & Kumar, M. S. V. (Eds.). (2008). Opening up Education: The Collective Advancement of Education Through Open Technology, Open Content, and Open Knowledge. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press. Inamorato dos Santos, A., Punie, Y., Castaño-Muñoz, J. (2016) Opening up Education: A Support Framework for Higher Education Institutions. JRC Science for Policy Report, EUR 27938 EN; doi:10.2791/293408 Paskevicius, M. (2017). Conceptualizing Open Educational Practices through the Lens of Constructive Alignment. Open Praxis, 9(2), 125. https://doi.org/10.5944/openpraxis.9.2.519 Wiley, D. (2018). Defining the ‘Open’ in Open Content and Open Educational Resources. Retrieved 16 February 2018, from http://opencontent.org/definition/

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