Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Stronger together: how to build your cross-team content engine

506 views

Published on

Getting people to collaborate on content creation, management and governance is hard. Here are some approaches that can help.

Published in: Internet
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Stronger together: how to build your cross-team content engine

  1. 1. Stronger together: how to build your cross-team content engine Perry Hewitt
  2. 2. aligning content teams can be hard
  3. 3. “Easter Eggs” by maptagsde is licensed under CC BY 2.0 Assumptions Flawed governance Inadequate training Few cross-team connections And more...
  4. 4. another kind of “magical thinking”
  5. 5. Magical Thinking Actual Reality 1. The number of hours in a day 2. The human inclination to work in tribes / silos / trusted groups
  6. 6. IDEATION AND PLANNING DISCOVERY AND PREPARATION DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT FEEDING THE BEAST
  7. 7. IDEATION AND PLANNING Goal: ● Ensure content strategy is on executive stakeholder radar. Tactic / tool: ● Create and socialize a roles and responsibilities document. Fight for it to live beyond product launch.
  8. 8. IDEATION AND PLANNING This example from Meet Content / Rick Allen includes useful Roles and Responsibilities questions, like: ● Does every role have defined responsibilities? Does everyone understand their responsibilities? ● What are the knowledge gaps? Is there expertise that is not adequately supported by those involved in the publishing process? ● Are there adequate staff resources to support your content strategy? ● Does everyone understand how his or her work relates to and affects others?
  9. 9. IDEATION AND PLANNING I would add: ● What role will the Product Owner play, on an ongoing basis, to promote cross-team collaboration around content? ● What role will HR play? How can we loop them in for awareness of hiring criteria and training as content teams evolve? ● Once we’ve established what skills gaps are / training needed, who will advocate for gaining those skills? ● Do we have a shared bar for what “excellent” or even “good enough” looks like, and who will contribute to keeping us aligned?
  10. 10. Food for thought: Align around high standards
  11. 11. Building a culture of high standards is well worth the effort, and there are many benefits. Naturally and most obviously, you’re going to build better products and services for customers – this would be reason enough! Perhaps a little less obvious: people are drawn to high standards – they help with recruiting and retention. More subtle: a culture of high standards is protective of all the “invisible” but crucial work that goes on in every company. I’m talking about the work that no one sees. The work that gets done when no one is watching. In a high standards culture, doing that work well is its own reward – it’s part of what it means to be a professional. https://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1018724/000119312518121161/d456916dex991.htm
  12. 12. IDEATION AND PLANNING Goal: ● Engage your peers to define the tools you will use for cross-team communication. Tactic / tool: ● Survey and interview content-responsible peers: what’s best for talking and learning? Just by asking the question, you’ve built a bridge.
  13. 13. IDEATION AND PLANNING
  14. 14. IDEATION AND PLANNING DISCOVERY AND PREPARATION DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT FEEDING THE BEAST
  15. 15. Goal: ● Drive attention to administrative interface to improve all content managers’ workflow. Tactic / tool: ● Spend time observing your users’ workflow for similar products. How does a piece of content get posted? Where are the assets stored, and what is their retrieval process? How are they using rollback and version history? What’s confusing or intuitive to them? DISCOVERY AND PREPARATION
  16. 16. DISCOVERY AND PREPARATION
  17. 17. DISCOVERY AND PREPARATION Goal: ● Build a shared understanding of content and data sources and their readiness. Tactic / tool: ● Build a draft content/data source checklist, and shop it around to other departments to surface hidden assumptions.
  18. 18. DISCOVERY AND PREPARATION Sample checklist: ❏ Make sure you have the definitive list of content/data to be integrated. ❏ How often is the source content updated? ❏ Whether manual or auto, have plan for updated or removed source content ❏ What format will the content be in? ❏ Build in flexibility to handle format variations ❏ Have a fall-back plan for integration failure (network, content source down, etc.) ❏ Allow for manual override where possible ❏ Determine whether it will be manual or automated. ❏ Complexity of source content ❏ Amount of content and frequency of content updates
  19. 19. IDEATION AND PLANNING DISCOVERY AND PREPARATION DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT FEEDING THE BEAST
  20. 20. Goal: ● Build a community of practice to sustain connections and learning among content creators. Tactic / tool: ● Get started with peer-to-peer, and budget for experts. Make the case to executive stakeholders of the value of community in hiring, retention, and quality output. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT
  21. 21. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT Digital Academy: ● Different captains ● Project manager ● External and internal voices ● Different venues ● Both formal presentations and poster sessions ● Food!
  22. 22. Goal: ● Ensure content is at the table as a product stakeholder in the design phase. Tactic / tool: ● Consider using “content priority guides” rather than typical wireframes. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT
  23. 23. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT https://alistapart.com/article/priority-guides-a-content-first-alternative-to-wireframes
  24. 24. Goal: ● Get a shared, cross-team understanding of content analytics during this build phase. Tactic / tool: ● Identify what "actions" are possible -- which content can be adjusted, then ensure the analytics reports enough data to help support these "actions." ● Figure out the business insights required from analytics for all the content teams. ● Use a checklist for what makes a good analytics practice and defining goals. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT
  25. 25. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT Sample checklist: ❏ How are we integrating content performance analytics across social / mobile / web? ❏ Are there shared dashboards in Data Studio or similar? Are these regularly reviewed / publicly displayed? ❏ What does MVP reporting look like: maximum insight and minimum clutter? ❏ Are teams making the same inferences based on the data? ❏ How are insights being translated back into content team actions? Shared with executive suite? Aligned with revenue goals?
  26. 26. Goal: ● Get a shared, cross-team understanding of accessibility -- to develop empathy for users and a culture of holding content teams accountable. Tactic / tool: ● Bring in native user of assistive tech to speak to content creators across teams. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT
  27. 27. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT
  28. 28. IDEATION AND PLANNING DISCOVERY AND PREPARATION DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT FEEDING THE BEAST
  29. 29. Goal: ● Whether you chose a centralized, hybrid, or decentralized web publishing model, it’s important to see where workflow is succeeding or failing. Tactic / tool: ● Conduct a content governance health check. FEEDING THE BEAST
  30. 30. FEEDING THE BEAST Governance health check session: ● Pre-select two content workflows: one that went well, and one that encountered challenges. ● Invite 5-7 participants: creators, reviewers, stakeholders. ● Appoint a facilitator / moderator for the session -- ideally, someone not in the workflow. ● In the meeting, track the path of each piece of content. What happened and why? ● Develop a hypothesis of the impact on governance guidelines, standards, and tools, and share with broader team.
  31. 31. FEEDING THE BEAST Goal: ● Keep creativity flowing back and forth among groups. Tactic / tool: ● Create excitement and energy by holding quick design studio workshops to solve a problem.
  32. 32. FEEDING THE BEAST
  33. 33. FEEDING THE BEAST Goal: ● Build trust through an “exchange of hostages”. Tactic / tool: ● Explore a secondment model. Look at peer roles across the org and see how “trading places” might work. A day a week? A six-month stint?
  34. 34. Magical Thinking → Actual Reality
  35. 35. Perry Hewitt @perryhewitt | perryhewitt@gmail.com

×