Conversations for Action

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Conversations for Action is a key component of the training that Mowgli Foundation Mentors undertake. It enables complex communications to take place. These slides provide some examples of making clear offers, clear commitments making requests, declaring a breakdown and offering feedback and assessment.

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Conversations for Action

  1. 1. Conversations for Action<br />From our Mentors and Entrepreneurs Learning Centre<br />UK Charity Registration: 1127087<br />Website: www.mowgli.org.uk<br />
  2. 2. Conversations for Action<br />Making Clear Offers<br />Simple offer: <br /> <br />"I will initiate a Skype call to you May 12th, at 7 pm." <br /> <br />Complex offer: <br /> <br />"I will be there to support you as best I am able, outside of our agreed upon times if you let me know what you need."<br />
  3. 3. Conversations for Action<br />Making Clear Commitments<br />Simple commitment: <br /> <br />"I will increase turnover, market share and headcount by xper cent as the best company within my sector over the next three years."<br /> <br />This commitment describes what, and by when something will happen. <br /> <br />Complex commitment:<br /> <br /> “I am a commitment to learning as much about my competitors as well as the skill shortfalls in myself and my business. Once my learning is complete, I will make a decision to grow or contract my business.” <br /> <br />This commitment requires a judgement about what learning is valuable and when that learning will be complete. <br />
  4. 4. Conversations for Action<br />Making Requests<br />Both the entrepreneur and the mentor may need to make direct requests of each other. Honest and straightforward requests give each individual the opportunity to accept, negotiate or decline the request. <br /> <br />For example, the entrepreneur may say to the mentor: "I am not good with business administration. Would you manage the financial side of my business and sort things out with the accountant?"<br /> <br />The mentor can respond: "No, I cannot do what you ask. My role as a mentor is to guide you towards solutions." <br /> <br />The mentor may also say "I have a request for you. We have talked about business administration issues in most of our conversations. I recommend that you take a course on financial management. Perhaps your accountant can also help you learn what you need." <br />
  5. 5. Conversations for Action<br />Declaring a Breakdown<br />Commitments are an understanding between two or more parties about by when, how and to what standard something will happen, be delivered or resolved. <br /> <br />When a deadline will be missed or there is confusion either the entrepreneur and the mentor can state that a breakdown has occurred. <br /> <br />Once there is a clear understanding the entrepreneur and mentor can renegotiate and recommit. <br /> <br />Either the entrepreneur or mentor can choose to walk away from the commitment instead of renegotiating. <br />
  6. 6. Conversations for Action<br />Giving Feedback and Assessments<br />Assessments and feedback are shared to share insight that may not otherwise been seen IF that insight will help the recipient. <br /> <br />Assessments and feedback are always offered in a spirit of good will and helpfulness. <br /> <br />Assessments and feedback are observations based on recent facts known to both the giver and receiver,<br /> <br />Assessments and feedback are not true or false. <br /> <br />In an equal and voluntary relationship, like that between a mentor and an entrepreneur, an assessment or feedback can be accepted or declined,<br />
  7. 7. Conversations for Action<br />Giving Feedback and Assessments (cont.)<br />When well-designed feedback is offered and received within a trusting relationship, assessments and feedback offer possibilities for learning and change. <br /> <br />This blog by HBR contributing writer Amy Gallo describes giving feedback to a boss: <br /> <br />http://blogs.hbr.org/hmu/2010/03/how-to-give-your-boss-feedback.html <br /> <br />Here is a description of the Principles of giving constructive feedback from the University of Southampton. <br /> <br />http://www.soton.ac.uk/lateu/professional_development/workshops/constructive_feedback.html<br />
  8. 8. You can find out more about the Mowgli Foundation and it’s training and development opportunities for Entrepreneurs and Mentors on our website<br />www.mowgli.org.uk<br />

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