Experimental museumprojects aam2012

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A presentation from the American Association of Museums conference about creating, supporting and producing experimental and social practice projects at museums.

Presenters: Maria Mortati, Sarah Schultz, Stephanie Parrish, and Susan Diachisn.

Note: please contact presenters for image copyright information.

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Experimental museumprojects aam2012

  1. 1. Experimental Projects:Creating a Community of Practice A panel for the American Associations of Museums conference, May 2012Maria Mortati, Introduction & ContextSarah Schultz, The Walker’s Open FieldStephanie Parrish, Shine a Light at PAMSusan Diachisin, The Center for Creative Connections at the DMA FACEBOOK/EXPERIMENTAL  MUSEUM  PROJECTS  COMMUNITY   1   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  2. 2. Experimental Projects:Creating a Community of Practice Maria  Morta<   Independent  Exhibit  Developer,   Founder,  SF  Mobile  Museum Co-Presenters: Susan Diachisin,  Stephanie   Parrish, Sarah  Schultz AAM 2012 Tuesday, May 1, 9 am 2   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  3. 3. &  how  “experimentalism”  informs  my  prac<ce  WHERE  I’M  COMING  FROM   3   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  4. 4. FORMAL  New  Interac<ve  Educa<on  Spaces,   Center  for  Crea<ve  Connec<ons,  Bal<more  Museum  of  Art   Dallas  Museum  of  Art  Children’s  Crea<vity  Museum   Fort  Collins  Museum  of  Discovery   4   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  5. 5. INFORMAL  The  San  Francisco  Mobile  Museum   The  Giant  Hand   Machine  Project  @  The  Hammer  Museum  Crier  Salon  by  Phil  Ross   Desire  Trails  Public  Program,   5   Headlands  Center  for  the  Arts   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  6. 6. Explore  and  share  how  to  support,  realize  and  engage  with  a  variety  of  experimental  projects  Explore  a  history  of  “socially  engaged  art”  or  experimental  work  Consider  needs  for  vocabulary,  offer  an  Elas<c  Manifesto,  Manual,  &  Bibliography  Discuss,  share  and  hopefully  connect   Why  We  Are  Gathered  Here  Today   6   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  7. 7. An  Overview  of  [some]  Experimental  Projects  Museum hosted artist Permanent Museumprojects: Spaces that act as platforms:Shine a Light @ PortlandMachine Project @ Hammer C3 @ DallasCritter Salon @ Hammer Open Field @ WalkerHybrid projects – neither art Art entities doingnor non-art: their own thing:San Francisco Mobile Museum Machine ProjectMobile Art Project Southern ExposureDenver Community Museum 7   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  8. 8. New  endeavors  have  a  need  for  a   shared  language  •  For  now,  we’re  just  going  to  talk  to  the   terminology  but  not  get  into  it   –  Social  art  or  socially  engaged  art   –  Par<cipatory  vs.  social  engagement   –  Art  vs.  interac<ve   –  Plaform   …so  we’ll  all  need  to  crah  it   8   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  9. 9. Except  for  this  one:  Plaforms  •  Plaforms  are  systems  that  support   mul<disciplinary  and     inter-­‐departmental  projects   9   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  10. 10. We  are  here  because  we  are  moving  from  an  old  world   order  to  a  new  world  order   Old  World:  sealed   New  World:  porous   10   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  11. 11. Old  World:  fixed   New  World:  organic   11   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  12. 12. Why  Are  Museums  Ripe?  •  “While  there  is  no  complete  agreement  as  to   what  cons<tutes  a  meaningful  interac<on  or   social  engagement,  what  characterizes  socially   engaged  art  is  its  dependence  on  social   intercourse  as  a  factor  of  its  existence.”   –  Pablo  Helgura   …because  we  are  fundamentally  social  en<<es   12   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  13. 13. Museum  experience   Museum  experience   13   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  14. 14.  “One  of  the  things  that  is  great  about  working  at   Machine  is  we  prototype  all  these  ideas…  it’s  a  challenge   for  museums  because  their  very  core  purpose  is  to   collect,  preserve,  and  educate  visitors  about  things  that   are  precious  and  live  forever.      Something  that  was  interes<ng  about  being  at  the   Hammer  for  a  year  was  it  allowed  things  to  cycle  in  and   out.  And  it  took  some  of  the  pressure  off  each  individual   thing.  If  you  can’t  acknowledge  that  what  you’re  trying   to  do  might  fail  and  sGll  value  what  you  learn  from  the   aHempt,  then  you  have  to  succeed.  “                  -­‐  Mark  Allen,  Machine  Project,  Hammer  Report   14   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  15. 15. We  Made  The  Most  Confusing     Way-­‐Finding  Device…  Ever?   -­‐  Or  -­‐     Talking  to  the  Hand   15   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  16. 16. hp://vimeo.com/15612336   16   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  17. 17. The  hand  is  both  art  and  way-­‐finding  •  It  was  fun,  it  got  people  where  they   needed  to  go  •  Mul<ple  purposes  and  contexts  in  a   museum  is  very  confusing….  TO  STAFF  &   SYSTEMS  •  It  was  not  a  design  solu<on   17   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  18. 18. Crier  Salon  at  the  Hammer     (and  other  sites)   by  Phil  Ross,  Arist   http://vimeo.com/22781774 18   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  19. 19. Who  Curates  the  Experience?  •  They  build  different  types  of   discussions,  capabili<es,   push  on  a  variety  of   departments  •  It  built  rela<onships  with   different  Affinity  Groups  in   the  region.  It  brought   different  audiences  to  the   Museum.   19   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  20. 20. Why  Do  We  Need  A  Community?  •  This  is  new  work  which  means  that:   –  It’s  not  tried  and  true  =  inven<ng   –  You’ll  need  to  create  that  shared  language  for   developing  the  work  •  We’re  building  a  prac<ce  which  is  different  from   presen<ng  people/artwork   –  It  needs  a  web  of  rela<onships  to  succeed  •  It’s  different  work  when  it’s  at  a  different   museum   20   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  21. 21. Ar<sts  may  or  may  not  read  it  A  FLEXIBLE  MANIFESTO  http://mortati.com/blog/?p=319 21   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  22. 22. Join  us  on  FACEBOOK  to  add  or  edit  AN  INITIAL  MANUAL  http://mortati.com/blog/?p=319 22   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  23. 23. Short,  shareable  and  ready  for  you  BIBLIOGRAPHY  http://mortati.com/blog/?p=319 23   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  24. 24. Experimental Projects:Creating a Community of Practice Sarah  Schultz   Curator  of  Public  Prac<ce  &  Director  of  Educa<on   Walker  Art  Center AAM 2012 Tuesday, May 1, 9 am 24   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  25. 25. Open FieldWalker Art CenterMinneapolis, Minnesota 25   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  26. 26. Open Field is a three-year experiment thatinvites the public andartists to create acultural commons onthe Walker’s greenspace   26   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  27. 27.  inspired by the belief that creative communities are collective endeavors that thrive in a landscape of diverse ideas and practices. 27   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  28. 28. We began with a four-acre lawn and the question:What would you do with an open field? 28   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  29. 29. This was an extension of earliersocial experiments and research. 29   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  30. 30. 30  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  31. 31. The 4C Model: A socially conscious approach to cultural programming. 31  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  32. 32. The spectrum of civic engagement activities.Commentary >> Dialogue >> Action >> Leadership 32   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  33. 33. Open Field in Theory Commons Theory Artistic Participatory Practice Culture This was part of a larger conversation about evolving institutional practice.   33   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  34. 34. Open Field in Practice Public Institution ArtistsOpen Field considers the different ways to share resources and create something together.   34   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  35. 35. Project Goals•  Resist the notion that the museum is the primary author of content and experience.•  Create a platform for many types of creative activity generated by both artists and non-artists.•  Position creativity as a collective and civic endeavor.•  Imagine a new kind of public gathering space for the city.•  Blend social, intellectual, and creative experiences and encounters. 35   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  36. 36. The Open Field Project evolved in stages, from a team of 5 to a community of 5,000.   Phase IV: Participation (5000 +)   Phase III: Implementation (150)   Phase II: Development (50)   Phase I: Ideation & Incubation (5)   36   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  37. 37. In January 2010 we convened a group of 30 architects, artists, and designers tocollaboratively propose ideas for the field. 37   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  38. 38. They identified steps to construct a social space 38   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  39. 39. and plotted potential interactions between artists and the public. 39   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  40. 40. They suggested tools and amenities to make the field more inviting. 40   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  41. 41. In spring 2010, a physical space was created adjacent to the museum 41   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  42. 42. featuring food, shade, seating, and a large open field. 42   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  43. 43. A Tool Shed and Drawing Club provide ongoing platforms for public engagement.43   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  44. 44. The public is invited to share their own creative activities with minimal mediation and 44  modest support from the Walker. Image copyright: please contact presenter
  45. 45. An online hub provides a public calendar, documentation, and guidelines for the field. 45   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  46. 46. The guidelines, or Field Etiquette, are outlined on the website. walkerart.org/openfield/ introducing-open-field/field- etiquette/ 46  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  47. 47. In hindsight, the Open Field strategiesof engagement looked like:•  Tools for empowering participation•  Rules for guiding participation•  Seeding or modeling participation•  Meeting to nurture the casual and social encounters 47   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  48. 48. Over the course of two years the public brought more than 200 activities to the field. 48   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  49. 49. Suzuki Violins Swedish Song Session in the Turrell 49  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  50. 50. The Public Intellectual 50  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  51. 51. Gorilla Yogis 51  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  52. 52. Plein Air PaintingWith a view of the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden 52   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  53. 53. In addition, the museum invited national artists to create projects with the public. 53   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  54. 54. Red76: Anywhere/Anyplace Academy 54   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  55. 55. Red76: Pop-Up Book Academy 55   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  56. 56. Futurefarmers: A People Without a Voice Cannot Be Heard 56  Commissioned by the Walker Art Center and Northern Lights.mn Image copyright: please contact presenter
  57. 57. Futurefarmers: Auctions Speak Louder Than Words 57   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  58. 58. Machine Project: Summer Jubilee / Concert for the American Lawn 58   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  59. 59. Machine Project: Summer Jubilee / Opera for Dogs 59   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  60. 60. Machine Project: Summer Jubilee / Building an outdoor oven 60   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  61. 61. Walker Kitchen Lab:A Mobile Hearth for Collectivist Action 61   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  62. 62. ROLU in ResidenceMaking as thinking. Participation as performance. 62   Photo: Zoe Prinds-Flash Image copyright: please contact presenter
  63. 63. In the voices of Open Field participants . . . 63   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  64. 64. “Open Field is a place where you can bring yourbest, creative self forward.” DiverCity and Mudboots Marching Band 64   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  65. 65. “Open Fieldreminded me ofhow removed I’vebecome from play.Humor can get usthrough theworkday, but forplay, we needother people andthe willingness tosuspend all self-consciousnesswith them.” 65   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  66. 66. “For me a small group talking about a topic unrelated to artistic practice is indeed the opening of a field. There are no bounds to the conversation and people can feel free to share and understand one another.” 66  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  67. 67. Photo: Zoe Prinds-Flash“I don’t know how to measure the success of my project. I now realize it’s not about successor failure but rather the opportunity to design new experiences. This is a shift in how I thinkabout my work and I have Open Field in part to thank for that revelation.” 67   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  68. 68. 68  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  69. 69. Have fun. 69   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  70. 70. Experimental Projects:Creating a Community of Practice Stephanie  Parrish   Associate  Director  of  Educa<on  &  Public  Programs,   Portland  Art  Museum AAM 2012 Tuesday, May 1, 9 am 70   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  71. 71. 71  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  72. 72. hp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4BfB8sNRXk   72   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  73. 73. Shine  A  Light   2009-­‐11   73  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  74. 74. 74  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  75. 75. 75  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  76. 76. Portland Art Museum: Shine A Light: Programming Goals (as written for 2010 & 2011)Programming•  Situate art (producing, interpreting, enjoying, puzzling over) as a living activity that everyone has the potential to participate in•  Encourage an atmosphere of participation between the museum, its visitors, and artists.•  Activate gallery spaces that suggest the museum is also a “site” of art production and practice.•  Situate the entire museum as place of multi-layered interpretations, conversations, and unplanned directions, multiple interpretations in the galleries•  Inspire inquiry into the connections between art and everyday life.•  Have fun!Audience•  To make the museum feel relevant to young arts-interested audiences, especially people between 18-45 years old. 76   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  77. 77. 77  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  78. 78. 78  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  79. 79. 79  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  80. 80. Hannah JicklingPortland Orienteering Museum, 2010 80   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  81. 81. 81  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  82. 82. 82  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  83. 83. Ariana  Jacob  with  Mirah  Serenedes:  Musical  Conversa@ons  Between  Humans  and  Artworks   83   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  84. 84. 84  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  85. 85. 85  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  86. 86. 86  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  87. 87. Harrell  Fletcher  Museum  Visitor  Cellphone  Photographs,  2009   87   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  88. 88. 88  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  89. 89. Ariana  Jacob   Art/Life  Partners,  2010   89  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  90. 90. 90  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  91. 91. 91  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  92. 92. 92  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  93. 93. 93  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  94. 94. Jason  Sturgill   Art  is  Forever,  2011   94  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  95. 95. Ariana  Jacob  Art  as  Experience,  Guaranteed,  2011   95   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  96. 96. 96  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  97. 97. Lexa  Walsh-­‐Ar<st-­‐in-­‐Residence   97   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  98. 98. Publishing/Sharing  the  Work   98   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  99. 99. 99  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  100. 100. Strategic PlanApproved by Board of Trustees, December 2010Strategic Directions:A. Serving as a Center for Visual Art, Film,CultureB. Innovating to Create Compelling AudienceExperiencesServe a lab for creativity by articulating andextending promising practices from recentexperiments.C. Engaging Diverse CommunitiesBuild involvement of diverse communities throughjoint education and curatorial initiatives that arerooted in outreach and listening. 100   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  101. 101. Susan  Diachisin     The  Kelli  and  Allen  Questrom  Director  of     the  Center  for  Crea<ve  Connec<ons   Dallas  Museum  of  Art   sdiachisin@dallasmuseumofart.org   214-­‐922-­‐1317   AAM 2012 Tuesday, May 1, 9 am5/1/12   Center  for  Crea<ve  Connec<ons   101   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  102. 102. C3  Mission  Statement   The  Center  for  CreaGve  ConnecGons   is  an  experimental  learning   environment  that  provides   interacGve  encounters  with   works  of  art  and  arGsts.    It  is   designed  to  s<mulate  curiosity,  inquiry,  and  reflec<on   in  visitors  of  all  ages  and  learning  styles.    The  Center   will  serve  as  a  bridge  between  our  everyday   experiences  of  looking  and  the  transforma<onal   experiences  of  seeing,  crea<ng,  and  connec<ng  deeply   with  works  of  art.   Center  for  Crea<ve  Connec<ons  5/1/12   102   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  103. 103. 11,000  visitors   12,000  sq.  feet   per  month   Gallery     Spaces   Changes   every  6  300+   months  arGsts  per  year   MulG-­‐ Community   generaGonal   Partnerships   Programs   103   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  104. 104. ExhibiGon  space  with  works  of  art  from  the  collec<on   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  105. 105. ExhibiGon  space  with  works  owart  the  wthe  cof  art   Par<cipatory  components   f  ith   from   orks  ollec<on   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  106. 106. Exhibits  designed  with  mul<-­‐genera<onal   visitors  in  mind     Image copyright: please contact presenter
  107. 107. A  Making  Bar  promotes  crea<ve  ac<vity   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  108. 108. Theater  for  film,  performance,  lecture  and   installa<on   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  109. 109. Art  Studio  for  workshops,  classes,  open   studio  Tech  Lab  where  art  and  technology  meet   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  110. 110. Arturo’s  Nest  for  children  4  and  under  Young  Learners  zone  for  children  5-­‐8  years  old   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  111. 111. See  Bibliography  for  more  details   OUR  VALUES,  AND  HOW  THEY  RELATE   TO  EXPERIMENTAL  PROJECTS  5/1/12   Center  for  Crea<ve  Connec<ons   111   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  112. 112. Our  Founding  Values    Visitor  Centric    Experimenta<on    Collabora<on    Crea<ve  Process    Community     Image copyright: please contact presenter
  113. 113. What  a  “Community  Partner  Response  Installa<on”     Can  Look  Like  5/1/12   Center  for  Crea<ve  Connec<ons   113   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  114. 114. Team  Structure  in  Rela<on     to  Community  Partners   Educa<on   Director  &   Exhibi<ons   Partnership   Director,   Exhibi<ons   Staff   Coordinator   Graphics   Designer   C3  staff   Registrar  PR   Community   Partner   Director   Preparators   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  115. 115. C3  gave   Community   Partners  a   high-­‐profile   area  and   crea<ve   freedom  Image copyright: please contact presenter
  116. 116. University  of  Texas  at  Arlington   School  of  Architecture  &  Interior  Design   TRIAL  RUN:  GROUP  AS   COMMUNITY  PARTNER  5/1/12   Center  for  Crea<ve  Connec<ons   116   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  117. 117. University  of  Texas  at  Arlington      School  of  Architecture  and  Interior  Design   117   Center  for  Crea<ve  Connec<ons   5/1/12   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  118. 118. •  Visitors  loved  it  •  Visitors  didn’t  dis<nguish  always  between  the  collec<on  art  and   student  work   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  119. 119. UTA  as  Community  Partner:  results  &  impacts   Tech Lab Grant Young Evaluation Tech Lab Install Program letter of Learners Subject Partner 2008 support Install Spring 2009 2012 Fall 2010 Fall 2011 2011 2008    2009    2010    2011      2012  Installa<on   5/1/12   Center  for  Crea<ve  Connec<ons   119   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  120. 120. With  Ar<st  Lesli  Robertson   ACHIEVING  PARTICIPATORY  DIVERSITY   THROUGH  COMMUNITY  PARTNERSHIP  5/1/12   Center  for  Crea<ve  Connec<ons   120   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  121. 121. Reaching  all  cons<tuencies  in  our  community   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  122. 122. Ar<st  Lesli  Robertson  included  the  work  of     580  par<cipants   122   Center  for  Crea<ve  Connec<ons   5/1/12   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  123. 123. The  installa<on  also  included  visitor  par<cipa<on   components  on  site   5/1/12   Center  for  Crea<ve  Connec<ons   123   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  124. 124. Ar<st  as  Community  Partner:  results  &  impacts   16 Bark cloth Workshops Bonnie’s exhibition 2009 Book 2010 advisor 2011 Letters of Evaluation Weaving Staff Gallery support Subject Demo Recomme Talk Workshop 2010, Spring ndation 2008 2009 2010 2011, 2011 2012 2012 Workshop 20112008    2009    2010    2011      2012   Installa<on  5/1/12   Center  for  Crea<ve  Connec<ons   124   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  125. 125. Southern  Methodist  University   BUILDING  RELATIONSHIPS  THROUGH   GROUP  AS  COMMUNITY  PARTNER  5/1/12   Center  for  Crea<ve  Connec<ons   125   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  126. 126. SMU  Project    Loca<on   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  127. 127. Interes<ng  Invite,  Complex  Dynamics:  •   5  Working  Ar<st  Faculty  members    •   2  Alumni  Ar<sts  •   +  Very  complex  installa<on   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  128. 128. Difficulty  balancing  the  ar<sts’  inten<ons  with   museum  aesthe<c  and  objects  (nearby)   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  129. 129. Plus  Side:  Programming  livened  the  installa<on   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  130. 130. Impact  of  SMU  as  Community  Partner   Late Night SMU Young Program Intern Advisory Learners 2011 Team Install 2012 2011 Fall 2011 7 Work- Kids Panel Gallery Teaching Improv shops Robotics Talks Kids in gallery 2011 2011,201 2012 2011 2011 2 Teen Program Rapid Tech Lab Advisory s Artists 2011, 2011,201 2011, 2012 2 20129    2010      2011        2012   Installa<on   5/1/12   Center  for  Crea<ve  Connec<ons   130   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  131. 131. These  projects  have  a  genera<ve  impact  on  the   community  and  museum    5/1/12   Center  for  Crea<ve  Connec<ons   131   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  132. 132. Experimental  Partner  Installa<ons  are  crea<ve     and  they  build  community   132   Center  for  Crea<ve  Connec<ons   5/1/12   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  133. 133. Q+A  •  Why  do  this?  How  do  you  sustain  this  work?  •  Ar<sts  are  ar<sts.  •  Where  does  the  crea<ve  spark  for  theses  projects   come  from?  •  Does  it  always  have  to  be  ar<sts  or  at  art  museums?  •  Is  this  work  messy?  How  can  it  be  good  AND  messy?    •  Why  do  we  need  allies?  •  What  didn’t  work?  Where  are  the  train  wrecks?  •  What’s  the  big  deal  about  DOCUMENTATION?  Why  is  it   so  important?   133   Image copyright: please contact presenter
  134. 134. Susan Diachisin Kelli and Allen Questrom Director of the Center for Creative Connections Dallas Museum of Art— dallasmuseumofart.org/C3 SDiachisin@dallasmuseumofart.orgMaria Mortati Independent exhibit developer & project planner Founder, San Francisco Mobile Museum maria@mortati.comSarah Schultz Director of Education and Curator of Public Practice Walker Art Center—walkerart.org sarah.schultz@walkerart.orgStephanie Parrish Associate Director of Education and Public Programs Portland Art Museum—pam.org stephanie.parrish@pam.org Manifesto,  Manual  Bibliography  can  be  found  at  http://mortati.com/blog/?p=319 134   Please  join  us  at:  FACEBOOK/EXPERIMENTAL  MUSEUM  PROJECTS  COMMUNITY   Image copyright: please contact presenter

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