FEBRUARY 2012The Optimism Tipping Point: Loyalty Diversity in BrazilThe 2011 COLLOQUY Cross-Cultural Loyalty StudyKelly Hl...
COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 1                                                             The Optimism Tipping P...
COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 2                                         Their motto might just be, “Past performan...
COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 3                                      I. The Proven Desire for Loyalty Rewards     ...
COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 4                                        II. Brazil’s Balance Between Pragmatism and...
COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 5Makes it easy to redeem for a reward when you have earned it                       ...
COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 6                      This optimism means that, despite their incredible pragmatism...
COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 7                                                                         68%       ...
COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 8                         31%                           31%             Exhibit 8   ...
COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 9                                       III. The Takeaway: Five Essentials          ...
COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 10                                     Financial services companies seem to recogniz...
COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 11Appendix:MethodologyThe 2011 COLLOQUY Cross-Cultural Loyalty Study was fielded via...
COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 12                                                                                  ...
COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 13                                                                                  ...
Asia Pacific Headquarters                                Hong Kong                                Room 2502, 25/F, Hopewell...
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Coloquy loyalty diversity in brazil white paper

  1. 1. FEBRUARY 2012The Optimism Tipping Point: Loyalty Diversity in BrazilThe 2011 COLLOQUY Cross-Cultural Loyalty StudyKelly Hlavinka Managing Partner, COLLOQUYJim Sullivan Partner, COLLOQUY sponsored by
  2. 2. COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 1 The Optimism Tipping Point: Loyalty Diversity in Brazil The 2011 COLLOQUY Cross-Cultural Loyalty StudyCOLLOQUY strives to provide valuable perspectives onhow businesses can strengthen relationships with con-sumers worldwide. In collaboration with LoyaltyOneand Epsilon, we studied consumer attitudes and percep-tions about loyalty in three developed economies:Canada, Australia and the U.S.; and three emergingeconomies: Brazil, China and India. The first of its kind,this study uncovers profound differences in these con-sumer environments, and has clear implications forpractitioners. IntroductionIn addition to the Brazil-specific insights found here, we Brazil’s economy has grown to impress the world just as its national football team has done foroffer a series of works from this study: decades. Consumers and companies in Brazil are learning to play the loyalty game as beautifully• “The Global Loyalty Compass” compares trends as team Canarinho controls the field, and both are achieving championship status. and expectations in both developed and emerging markets. While some nations have created economic successes whose benefits have mostly gone to stockholders and the wealthy elite, Brazil’s recent successes have lifted the entire country. In the• “The Rules of Engagement: Loyalty in the U.S. and process, it has created an ever-growing, more prosperous population with new needs and desires. Canada” examines challenges and opportunities in these two countries, incorporating trends from our While consumer attitudes are in some ways similar to those of the middle class in other developed previous research. nations, they are also uniquely rooted in Brazil’s culture and experience.• “Marketing Mosaic: Loyalty Diversity in India” 49% Exhibit 1 explores the future of loyalty marketing in what is Low Participation Due to Lack of predicted to be a $450-billion retail market by 2015. ProgramsAnd Epsilon International delivers additional insights Reason for not participating: No programin its reports: offered by frequented companies 2-3x• “From Love to Loyalty: Engaging India’s Consumers Source: 2011 COLLOQUY Cross-Cultural Loyalty Study for Long-Term, Profitable Relationships” offers in- • Q: What is your reason(s) for not participating in a rewards program? “The companies I like to / usually shop depth analysis of behavior and motivators of today’s at do not offer any rewards programs.” 28% • Results indicate proportion of non-members making the consumers in India, with engagement and communi- selection. Results for emerging countries are for SEC cation implications for marketers. A/B. Significant differences are highlighted in bold. • n = 865 22%• “Regaining Trust and Faith Among Australian Con- sumers” examines the austere marketing conditions 18% in Australia and sheds light on how to successfully 15% engage these savvy consumers. 13%• “China – Pledging Allegiance to Brands” identifies the drivers of brand preference, sensitivities around brand loyalty and preferred channels of communica- tion in China, and offers considerations for effective BR U.S. IN CA CH AU marketing strategies. Today’s typical Brazilian consumers are deeply pragmatic about their immediate realities while also believing that the future is more promising than ever. That pragmatism was learned by persevering and triumphing over times of unbelievable economic adversity. Brazilians are not people to be gulled by promises and shiny exteriors. They look hard at something before making a purchase. sponsored by
  3. 3. COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 2 Their motto might just be, “Past performance is not a guarantee of future returns.” Companies must earn customers’ business each and every time. Even so, earning customer loyalty is hardly impossible. As customers’ circumstances continue to improve, they increasingly want to find brands they can trust and stick with long term. The desire is already evident: A third of all upper- and middle-class Brazilians already belong to a loyalty rewards program. Nearly half of those who don’t participate said it is only because so few companies offer loyalty programs. Consumers looking to be rewarded for their loyalty are no longer relying on price as the sole measure of value. The opportunity for businesses here is clear. The potential payoff is significant because, as our research finds, loyalty-program influence on purchasers is two- to three-times greater in Brazil than in developed countries like the U.S. and Canada. The challenges to implementing a successful program in Brazil are: • Understanding the unique, Brazilian definition of customer loyalty; • Respecting citizens’ demanding concerns about privacy; and • Finding a way to connect with the next generation of consumers.The opportunity for businesses These challenges aren’t road blocks. They are more like lane guides for how to best appeal to andhere is clear. The potential payoff is connect with consumers.significant because, as our researchfinds, loyalty-program influence onpurchasers is two- to three-timesgreater in Brazil than in developedcountries like the U.S. and Canada. sponsored by
  4. 4. COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 3 I. The Proven Desire for Loyalty Rewards Let’s begin by looking at which Brazilians already belong to loyalty programs and why they do so. This examination offers key insights into how to change other consumers’ behavior. As noted before, 33% of the upper- and middle-class Brazilians – those with the greatest buying power – already belong to a loyalty program. However, 43% of upper-income households participate, as opposed to only 26% of middle-income households. The discrepancy illustrates the direct connection between buying power and the ability to earn rewards within a reasonable time frame. As spending power increases in the emerging middle class, these consumers are buying products and services in new categories. And they are more likely to be purchasing enough to earn meaningful rewards over a short period of time. 43% Exhibit 2 Class-Based Differences in Loyalty Program ParticipationRight now, Brazil is perfectly 33% Source: 2011 COLLOQUY Cross-Cultural Loyalty Study, Brazilian Results • Q: Do you currently belong to any rewards programs?positioned for a huge growth in • Results are for those who selected “Yes” to participating in a rewards program. Significant differences are highlighted in bold.loyalty programs, thanks to several 26% • n = 519factors. These include increasingeconomic stability in the country,growing consumer optimism, andplenty of room for new programs. SEC A/B/C SEC A/B SEC C Business sectors that cater to the top tier of earners – like travel and financial services – enjoy the highest penetration of loyalty programs. Overseas programs in these industries were among the easiest to copy and import, after all. And, in some cases, alliances between Brazilian companies and foreign strategic partners sped the process along. Of Brazilians surveyed, 17% said they participate in travel industry rewards programs, and 16% in financial services programs. Just 10% listed telecommunications programs, and 7% listed restaurant programs. In addition to underscoring the connection between buying power and where program memberships are taking hold, these findings reveal how big the opportunity is for businesses to take advantage of the desire for loyalty rewards programs. Consumer demand for programs is high, but the percentage of Brazilian businesses offering loyalty program options is low – so far. Right now, Brazil is perfectly positioned for a huge growth in loyalty programs, thanks to several factors. These include increasing economic stability in the country, growing consumer optimism, and plenty of room for new programs. Companies that jump in early and understand what Brazilian consumers want will have a winning competitive advantage. sponsored by
  5. 5. COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 4 II. Brazil’s Balance Between Pragmatism and Optimism Brazil’s consumers differ from other nations’ consumers as distinctly as the Canarinho differs from other nations’ teams. What sets the football team apart is its grace and success; what sets the consumers apart is a unique combination of pragmatism and optimism forged by their experience creating Brazil’s economic resurgence. In addition to its other accomplishments, the nation’s growing economy is producing consumers ready to see the value of these programs. After years of living with wild inflation, Brazilians are now enjoying the peace of mind that comes with a stable currency, and they want the rewards from their hard work and perseverance. One result is the widespread adoption of credit cards – which make accumulating rewards points or miles a seamless part of the purchase process. 32% Exhibit 3 Influence of Reward Programs 28% Loyalty programs’ influence on the purchaser 27% is greater in emerging countries than in developed countries 2x Source: 2011 COLLOQUY Cross-Cultural Loyalty Study • Q: Overall, how much do the rewards programs you belong to influence your decision about where you make a purchase? Please use the scale from 1 to 10, where 1 means “not at all influential” and 10 means “extremely 17% influential.” Please select one response only. • Results indicate Top 2 Box proportions. Results are for 15% rewards program members only and SEC A/B in emerging countries. • n = 2,636 12% U.S. CA AU IN CH BRMEAN 6.4 6.0 6.1 7.0 7.8 6.5 Consumer interest in loyalty programs is only one reason that businesses should take interest in them. For example, loyalty programs are especially influential with consumers in emerging markets. This is because the programs themselves allow people to receive the special treatment they want. The delivery of that treatment can be relatively low-key, or it can be more extravagant – like access to a VIP lounge. COLLOQUY’s research shows 43% of Brazilians expect special treatment from sales people – this is nearly 20% higher than any other country we surveyed. Pragmatic today . . . Brazilians are more pragmatic about their immediate needs. They focus on getting the most for the least – which means pursuing discounts when shopping, making careful decisions about the value propositions that loyalty programs present. To succeed, a program must be seamless to use and give people the types of rewards they want. Here are the top four reasons why Brazilians join a program. sponsored by
  6. 6. COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 5Makes it easy to redeem for a reward when you have earned it Exhibit 4 59% Influenced to Join by Coalition Program FeaturesAllows you to earn reward points or miles from a number of Top 4 factors influencing Brazilians’ decisionsdifferent retailers, partners or brands using the same card to join a program 58% Source: 2011 COLLOQUY Cross-Cultural Loyalty Study,Allows you to earn rewards within a reasonable amount of time Brazilian Results • Q: Please indicate how important each of the following 54% factors are, or would be, in your decision to join a rewards program (assuming one was available to you)? Please use the scale from 1 to 10, where 1 means “not at all important” and 10 means “very important.”Gives you lots of ways to earn rewards faster • Results are for program members and those willing to participate in a program SEC A/B. Results indicate Top 2 Box proportions “very important.” 52% • n = 193 In one respect, these factors can be boiled down to one motivation: Ease of use. But, as the chart shows, what ease of use means isn’t always self-evident. Consider: The second most important influence on Brazilians joining a program is the ability to earn points or miles from a number of different businesses. While that may sound counterproductive to creating customer loyalty to individual brands, it isn’t. A coalition program like DOTZ or MultiPlus allows businesses to leverage the knowledge and customer base of all member companies while still maintaining their own identity. Coalitions don’t partner with two of the same type of store. So your grocery chain, for example, will be uniquely positioned to get access to the customers from all the other participating businesses. The coalition will also be able to gather more data and employ more insights than a store or even chain operating independently could. Finally, the coalition creates an economy of scale, allowing businesses to provide many more reward options than they could have on their own. . . . Optimistic tomorrow . . . Because of the nation’s economic turnaround, Brazilians may be the most optimistic people on Earth right now. They are certainly the most optimistic people of any nation we surveyed. Even the Chinese, emerging as one of the most powerful economies on Earth, aren’t nearly as hopeful for the future. 71% Exhibit 5 Optimism for the Coming Decade Consumers in emerging countries express economic optimism at a level 2-4 times higher than those in developed countries 47% 2-4x Source: 2011 COLLOQUY Cross-Cultural Loyalty Study • Q: Please indicate how much you agree or disagree with the following statement. “I am confident that my/ my 34% family’s economic prospects will improve over the next ten years.” Please use the scale from 1 to 10, where 1 means “strongly disagree” and 10 means “strongly agree.” • Results indicate Top 2 Box proportions for those who “Strongly Agree,” and mean score. • n = 4,414 17% 18% 12% U.S. CA AU IN CH BRMEAN 6.2 6.4 5.9 7.5 7.9 8.8 sponsored by
  7. 7. COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 6 This optimism means that, despite their incredible pragmatism, Brazilians dream big. It’s impossible to overstate the importance of that aspirational aspect to Brazil’s consumers. The best way to understand the importance is to look at their view of what money is for. We asked people in six nations if they thought of money as: • A necessity • Security • A key to enjoying your life • Power • A way to achieve dreams and goals While “a way to achieve dreams and goals” was a popular choice everywhere, it was the choice of 86% of Brazilians – far, far more than people in any other country. 39% Exhibit 6 38% Preferences for Aspirational Benefits Consumers in emerging countries prefer aspirational rewards 28% Source: 2011 COLLOQUY Cross-Cultural Loyalty Study • Q: Please indicate how important each of the following factors are, or would be, in your decision to join a 2.5x rewards program (assuming one was available to you). “Offers rewards that allow you to dream.” Please use the scale from 1 to 10, where 1 means “not at all important” and 10 means “very important.” • Results indicate Top 2 Box proportions for members and those willing to participate in the future. Results are for SEC A/B in emerging countries. • n = 3,397 14% 14%13%U.S. CA AU IN CH BR The thing to remember is that Brazilians want rewards that give them something they dream about. While this is generally true in all emerging nations, Brazil wants it more than others and far more than the citizens of any of the other six nations we surveyed. . . . With a large measure of healthy skepticism Perhaps related to Brazilian pragmatism, our research found that Brazilians are less trusting overall than consumers in the other nations we looked at. In particular, Brazilians are far less willing to trust companies to protect their privacy and their data. sponsored by
  8. 8. COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 7 68% Exhibit 7 Privacy Concerns Are Widespread Brazilians are the most concerned; Indians and Chinese are also concerned – but to a lesser 52% degree 51% 49% Source: 2011 COLLOQUY Cross-Cultural Loyalty Study 41% • Q: Please indicate how much you agree or disagree with each of the following statement. “I am concerned about the privacy and protection of my personal information.” Please use the scale from 1 to 10, where 1 means “strongly 33% disagree” and 10 means “strongly agree.” • Results indicate Top 2 Box proportions for those who “strongly agree.” • n = 4,414 U.S. CA AU IN CH BRMEAN 7.9 7.9 7.7 7.3 7.7 8.4 Nearly 70% of Brazilians said they are strongly concerned about privacy and the protection of their personal information. This figure dwarfs the level of concern about privacy reported in every other nation we surveyed. The issue of privacy is most acute among consumers age 18-25. Only 18% of that Young Adult segment said they would be willing to provide more personal information to enable companies to provide them with more relevant product and service offerings. That’s a third less than the General Population as a whole. Brazilians are skeptical and asking questions. This conclusion is made clear by their attitudes toward the use of personal information. Brazilians are concerned about what private electronic data companies gather and how it is handled. Younger consumers in particular doubt that business will put the interests of the consumer first. Although this mistrust could be seen as a barrier between business and customers, it’s actually an opportunity to increase connections between the two. sponsored by
  9. 9. COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 8 31% 31% Exhibit 8 Youth Least Willing to Provide Information for Relevance27% 26% Willingness to provide additional information for relevance Source: 2011 COLLOQUY Cross-Cultural Loyalty Study, Brazilian Results 18% • Q: Please indicate how much you agree or disagree with each of the following statements. Please use the scale from 1 to 10, where 1 means “strongly disagree” and 10 means “strongly agree.” Please select one response for each statement. “I would be willing to provide more personal information if companies sent me relevant product and service offers based on what I have provided them.” • Results indicate Top 2 Box proportions. • n = 519SEC A/B/C 18-25 26-34 35-44 45+ The opportunity lies in demonstrating that you understand these reservations, particularly when it comes to privacy. Many companies express their policies regarding privacy and personal information documents like “end-user licensing agreements” written in language only a lawyer could interpret. Instead, make the process as transparent as possible. Consider featuring an easy-to-understand statement that also offers easy “opt-out” options and lets customers determine how much informa- tion they want to share and what will be done with it. sponsored by
  10. 10. COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 9 III. The Takeaway: Five Essentials As the findings of the 2011 COLLOQUY Cross-Cultural Loyalty Study demonstrate, Brazilians are optimistic, but pragmatic. And they have an eye on the goal. To reach them, marketers must exhibit those same characteristics. With an eye on the goal, coach your loyalty team in these strategies: 1: Get the first-mover advantage. We’re at crucial moment in the development of Brazilian consumers. They’re moving on from the tough times of the past, which means they’re just beginning to acquire a new set of habits and attitudes – especially when it comes to how they spend the new levels of income they now enjoy. They want the payoff from all the hard work they’ve done. They want to be acknowledged as special and important. As we’ve seen, few companies are currently responding to these desires. Brazilians say the primary reason they aren’t participating in a loyalty rewards program is because the opportunity isn’t offered to them – meaning that having a program in the first place is in itself an important differentiator. A good program will make your business stand out. Building a program now will give you a significant advantage over competitors, who will be forced to play catch-up. Your business will establish itself as one that proactively works to meet customers’Brazilians are optimistic, but prag- needs.matic. And they have an eye on the 2: Recognize consumers’ dreams. Brazilians’ desires reflect their optimism. They want special treatment that reflects their betteredgoal. To reach them, marketers must economic circumstances.exhibit those same characteristics. This treatment may include “everyday indulgence” rewards like a massage or dinner for two at a favorite local restaurant. Or it could encompass larger treats like time at a super-exclusive spa, premier tickets for a football match or concert, an ultra-luxurious trip or a meal at that restaurant even Ivete Sangalo has trouble getting a reservation for. More than 60% of Brazilians reported that they prefer saving for big rewards instead of cashing in as soon as they can afford something smaller. One company that understands this desire is Accorhotels, which offers its A Club members the opportunity to redeem for such experiential rewards as tickets to shows, or to Formula One auto racing. 3: Emphasize soft benefits. Rewards certainly catch consumers’ attention, but so will recognizing those consumers as special and important. Brazilians want to know that a business is as loyal to them as they are to it. Businesses must acknowledge this with soft benefits that are evident each time the customer transacts with it. This recognition can take a number of different forms: • A unique cashier or checkout process • A lounge – either in the store or access to an airline lounge when they travel. • Discounts given on a birthday, or for having been a customer for a certain amount of time • Shopping times when only they have access to the business • Events – like a celebrity appearance – that only they are invited to sponsored by
  11. 11. COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 10 Financial services companies seem to recognize the importance of these recognition benefits. Mastercard, for example, offers Black Card members access to a special “lounge” in the winter resort town of Campo de Jordao, where they can log into the internet, use meeting rooms, and take advantage of access to limousine service. 4: Reward for word-of-mouth behavior. In Brazil, more so than in other nations COLLOQUY examined, people defined a loyal customer as someone who has a long tenure with a business and who recommends it to friends. Brazilians are significantly more vocal about their positive and negative brand experiences than citizens in other countries – two-thirds tell family and friends about a positive experience with a particular company. To succeed, therefore, a Brazilian rewards program must also recognize and reward this word-of- mouth behavior, perhaps by awarding points or miles when a new customer identifies an existing customer as how he or she found out about the business. 5: Emphasize ease of use. Brazilian consumers have a high concern about privacy and the use of their personal data. Businesses must design programs with appropriately high levels of transparency and communication.Brazilians are significantly more Ensure that personal data is protected, and that policies for its use are clearly communicated notvocal about their positive and only to consumers, but also internally and with any external partners. A privacy policy must be easynegative brand experiences than for customers to access, and to understand.citizens in other countries – two- Equally important, the process of earning and redeeming rewards must be straightforward and intuitive. Employ systems and people to suggest how to get the most from those rewards. Make itthirds tell family and friends easier for customers to earn points or miles by partnering with other companies, or by joining aabout a positive experience with a coalition.particular company. Goal! Brazil’s economy is poised to mirror the success of its football team, embarking on a string of victories and World Cup finals. If offered the right value proposition, Brazilian consumers can become as loyal to their brands as they are to their world-ranked sports team. Don’t wait until 2014, when Brazil hosts the World Cup championship. The time to establish Brazilian consumer loyalty is now. sponsored by
  12. 12. COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 11Appendix:MethodologyThe 2011 COLLOQUY Cross-Cultural Loyalty Study was fielded via an online survey during July 2011.Though this paper concentrates on Brazilian results, the overall study was conducted in 6 countries.Approximately 1,000 responses were collected in both the U.S. and Canada, while a minimum of 500responses were collected in Australia, China, India and Brazil. The online survey was run in English inall countries, but also translated to French in Canada, Simplified Chinese in China, and Portuguese inBrazil.Respondents in the emerging economies of China, India and Brazil were further classified bysocioeconomic class A, B and C (D and E classes were not included). COLLOQUY collected aminimum of 300 responses for SEC A/B and 200 responses for SEC C in each of the emergingcountries studied.Specific to Brazil:• The standard SEC system was used. This system takes into account the education of the head of household, the number of consumable goods owned by family, and whether or not the household has a monthly maid to determine SEC.• SEC Classes A/B: n = 309. SEC Class C: n = 209.• Regions represented by respondents include Center-West, Northeast, North, Southeast, South. Surveyed Total Sample Demographic SegmentUnited States n = 1100 General Population + Affluent, Young Adults, SeniorsCanada n = 1151 General Population + Affluent, Young Adults, SeniorsAustralia n = 510 General Population OnlyIndia n = 508 SEC Classes A, B, and C OnlyChina n = 627 SEC Classes A, B, and C OnlyBrazil n = 518 SEC Classes A, B, and C Only sponsored by
  13. 13. COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 12 The Optimism Tipping Point: Loyalty Diversity in Brazil The 2011 COLLOQUY Cross-Cultural Loyalty Study The Authors As COLLOQUY Managing Partner, Kelly Hlavinka has helped define and carry out COLLOQUY’s mission as the voice of the loyalty industry since 1996. Drawing on her 20 years as a loyalty specialist, Kelly develops articles, white papers and educational initiatives that illuminate the many ways to unlock the asset of customer-specific data for her clients. Kelly has shared her expertise with correspondents of The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, USA Today, Brandweek, BusinessWeek, Advertising Age and SmartMoney. A sought-after presenter, she has taught loyalty-marketing workshops and webinars around the world. Kelly in 2003 launched and managed COLLOQUY’s strategic consultancy, working with clients such as Lennar Homes, MGM Mirage, Eddie Bauer, Best Buy, HP and American Express. Prior experience includes positions managing membership programs with Buyers Choice (now The Polk Co.) and the National Wildlife Federation, and she has held database-marketing positions with ACS and Equifax Consumer Direct. As COLLOQUY Partner, Jim Sullivan directs the advancement of Enterprise Loyalty at COLLOQUY, an endeavor guided by his almost 30 years of managing in marketing, strategic planning, business development, innovation, and commu- nications. Jim assists with COLLOQUY’s loyalty workshops, seminars and confer- ences, and serves as an academic liaison for colleges, universities and other institutions researching Enterprise Loyalty. Before joining COLLOQUY, Jim founded and was a principal at Built to Lead, a leadership development practice. From 1997 to 2008, he worked at Alliance Data Inc., as Chief Marketing and Planning Officer and a member of the Executive Committee for the Retail Services division, and earlier as SVP at Information Resources Inc., consulting with such clients as Procter & Gamble, Kraft USA and ConAgra Frozen Foods. Research Coordinator Wardah Malik Research Analyst Jill Hickman4445 Lake Forest Dr., Cincinnati OH 45242Telephone: +1.513.248.9184Fax: +1.513.248.9184Email: info@colloquy.com©2012 LoyaltyOne US, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint may be granted upon specific request. COLLOQUY is a trademark ofAlliance Data Systems Corporation used under license by LoyaltyOne US, Inc., an Alliance Data Systems Company. sponsored by
  14. 14. COLLOQUY.COM | COLLOQUYtalk | 02.12 | 13 The Optimism Tipping Point: Loyalty Diversity in Brazil The 2011 COLLOQUY Cross-Cultural Loyalty Study About COLLOQUY COLLOQUY comprises a collection of publishing, education and research resources devoted to the global loyalty marketing industry. COLLOQUY has served the loyalty marketing industry since 1990 with more than 45,000 global subscribers. Its research division develops consumer and B2B studies and white papers, and COLLOQUY provides educational services through workshops, webinars and speeches worldwide. www.colloquy.com About LoyaltyOne LoyaltyOne is a global provider of loyalty strategy and programs, customer analytics and relationship marketing services, working with more than 100 of the world’s leading brands in the retail, financial services, grocery, petroleum retail, travel, and hospitality industries to profitably change customer behavior. LoyaltyOne designs, delivers and manages a suite of loyalty marketing services – consumer data, customer-centric retail strategies, direct-to- consumer marketing, loyalty consulting, and more. www.loyalty.com About Epsilon International Epsilon International is the industry’s leading marketing services company, with a broad array of data-driven, multi-channel marketing solutions that leverage consumer insight to help brands deepen relationships with customers. Epsilon works with many of the most-recognized brands in the world. Services include strategic consulting, acquisition and customer database technologies, email marketing and analytic services, predictive modelling, loyalty management, and direct and digital agency services. With offices in Australia, China, Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, U.K., France and Germany, Epsilon International is an operating unit of Epsilon. Founded in 1969, Epsilon is headquartered in Dallas, U.S., and comprises three services groups: Marketing Technology, Aspen, and Epsilon Targeting data services. Epsilon is the world’s largest permission-based email marketing provider, and has been named email service provider leader in a renowned independent research report since 2002. For more about Epsilon in Asia Pacific: www.epsilon.com/apac, apac-info@epsilon.com.4445 Lake Forest Dr., Cincinnati OH 45242Telephone: +1.513.248.9184Fax: +1.513.248.9184Email: info@colloquy.com©2012 LoyaltyOne US, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint may be granted upon specific request. COLLOQUY is a trademark ofAlliance Data Systems Corporation used under license by LoyaltyOne US, Inc., an Alliance Data Systems Company. sponsored by
  15. 15. Asia Pacific Headquarters Hong Kong Room 2502, 25/F, Hopewell Center 183 Queen’s Road East Wanchai, Hong Kong Tel: +852 3589 6300 Fax: +852 3101 2892Australia - Sydney Australia - Melbourne SingaporeSuite 22, Suite 4, Level 28 #18-98 Office 1, The Central88 Cumberland Street 303 Collins Street 8 Eu Tong Sen StreetThe Rocks, Sydney Melbourne Singapore 059818NSW 2000, Australia VIC 3000, Australia Tel: +65 6603 5088Tel: +61 (2) 9271 5400 Tel: +61 (3) 9678 9031 Fax: +65 6438 1132Fax: +61 (2) 9271 5499 Fax: +61 (3) 9678 9009China - Shanghai China - Beijing TokyoSuite 103, Block D, Red Town Room 7, 15/F, Block C, Wantong Centre Ark Mori Building, 12th FloorNo. 570 Huai Hai Road West No.6A Chaoyangmen Wai Avenue 1-12-32 AkasakaShanghai 200052, China Chaoyang District Minato-kuChina Toll-free: 400-880-8736 Beijing 100020, China Tokyo 107-6012, JapanFax: +86 (21) 6281 6862 China Toll-free: 400-880-8736 Tel: +81 (0) 3 4360 9350 Fax: +86 (10) 5907 3002 Fax: +81 (0) 3 4360 8201apac-info@epsilon.comepsilon.com/apac

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