THURSDAY

2.13.2014

W W W.YOU RGL E N ROSET X .COM

Glen Rose Reporter
ELECTION GUIDE

GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C2

Republican Party chair we...
ELECTION GUIDE

GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C3

JP Webb runs unopposed

J...
ELECTION GUIDE

GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C4

One-term judge ready for ...
ELECTION GUIDE

GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C5

MEET THE CANDIDATES - Cou...
ELECTION GUIDE

GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C6

MEET THE CANDIDATES - Cou...
ELECTION GUIDE

GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C7

Member of county’s first ...
ELECTION GUIDE

GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C8

MEET THE CANDIDATES - Com...
ELECTION GUIDE

GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C9

MEET THE CANDIDATES - Com...
ELECTION GUIDE

GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C10
ELECTION GUIDE

GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C11

Treasurer to leave behin...
ELECTION GUIDE

GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C12

MEET THE CANDIDATES - Co...
ELECTION GUIDE

GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C13

Curtis unopposed in re-e...
ELECTION GUIDE

GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C14

Incumbent clerk prepares...
ELECTION GUIDE

GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C15

MEET THE CANDIDATES - Co...
ELECTION GUIDE
BEST

Continued from C5
overtime. I will recommend
a hiring freeze and only
replace employees —
with approv...
Rep election guide 2014
Rep election guide 2014
Rep election guide 2014
Rep election guide 2014
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Rep election guide 2014

  1. 1. THURSDAY 2.13.2014 W W W.YOU RGL E N ROSET X .COM Glen Rose Reporter
  2. 2. ELECTION GUIDE GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C2 Republican Party chair welcomes a crowd RepuPlican Club salutes old glory AMANDA KIMBLE/GRR Alan Sumners, Somervell County Republican Club president, leads a crowd in the Pledge of Allegiance prior to the start of a candidate forum hosted by the club Feb. 6. AMANDA KIMBLE/GRR Incumbent Deedee Jones, local Republican Party chair, addresses a standing room only crowd and long list of candidates — 21 in five contested and three uncontested races — at the Feb. 6 meeting of Somervell County Republican Club. Jones, whose name appears on the March 4 ballot, seeks another term at the helm of party. Meanwhile, Jennifer Miller is seeking the Democratic Party chair nomination. Candidates Darrell Best, Mickey Garrett, Rick Clark, Edwin Mueck and Jeff Slaton prepare for the Feb. 6 Republican Club Candidate Forum by pledging their allegiance.
  3. 3. ELECTION GUIDE GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C3 JP Webb runs unopposed JP May ready to serve AMANDA KIMBLE/GRR Justice of the Peace Ronnie Webb, Pct. 1 — running unopposed — spoke to constituents at the Thursday, Feb. 6 meeting of Somervell County Republican Club. The organization invited candidates to speak about themselves and their bids for election at an event that welcomed a standing-room-only crowd. Webb was appointed to the office in November 2009 and has held the seat since. The office is elected by voters in precincts 1 and 2. “I would appreciate your vote in March and November,” he told the Republican Club crowd. AMANDA KIMBLE/GRR Justice of the Peace Scott May, Pct. 2 — also running opposed — is in his fourth year of service. May is elected by residents in Somervell County voting precincts 3 and 4, and calls his service the “best job” he “ever had.” While he faces no opposition in March, May is still working to gain voter support, asking those within the precincts he presides over to cast ballots in his favor. Pr o p o s i t i o n s Republicans to weigh in on key issues GRR Staff Report Somervell County residents casting a Republican ballot March 4 will have the opportunity to weigh in on six propositions penned by the state’s Republican Executive Committee. Essentially, Republicans are getting a chance to voice their opinions on issues like prayer in public places, abolishment of the state franchise tax, repeal- ing Obamacare and random drug testing for welfare recipients. The resolutions include Republican priorities, selected by the executive committee. The non-binding ballot propositions are intended to send a message to state and federal legislators. The six ballot propositions on the March 4 ballot ask Republicans to vote “yes” or “no” on the following issues: Religious Freedom: Texans should be free to express their religious beliefs, including prayer, in public places. Second Amendment: Texas should support Second Amendment liberties by expanding locations where concealed handgun license-holders may legally carry. Franchise tax: Texas should abolish the state franchise tax, also known as margins tax, to encourage business growth. Welfare reform: Texas recipients of taxpayer-funded public assistance should be subject to random drug testing as a condition of receiving benefits. No lawmaker exceptions: All elected officials and their staff should be subject to the same laws, rules, regulations and ordinances as their constituents. Obamacare: The Affordable Care Act, also known as “Obamacare,” should be repealed. What’s on the Republican ballot? FEDERAL REPRESENTATION U.S. SENATOR º º º º º º º º Curt Cleaver John Cornyn, Incumbent Dwayne Stovall Ken Cope Chris Mapp Steve Stockman Reid Reasor Linda Vega º Roger Williams, Incumbent U.S. REPRESENTATIVE, DISTRICT 25 STATE RACES GOVERNOR º Miriam Martinez º Larry Secede Kilgore º Lisa Fritsch º Greg Abbott LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR º º º º Todd Staples Jerry Patterson David Dewhurst, Incumbent Dan Patrick ATTORNEY GENERAL º Dan Branch º Barry Smitherman º Ken Paxton COMPTROLLER OF PUBLIC ACCOUNTS º º º º Debra Medina Harvey Hilderbran Raul Torres Glenn Hegar º º David Watts George P. Bush º º º º º J Allen Carnes Eric Opiela Sid Miller Tommy Merritt Joe Cotten º º º º Malachi Boyuls Becky Berger Ryan Sitton Wayne Christian º º Nathan Hecht, Incumbent Robert Talton º º Jeff Brown, Incumbent Joe Pool COMMISSIONER OF THE GENERAL LAND OFFICE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE RAILROAD COMMISSIONER CHIEF JUSTICE, SUPREME COURT JUSTICE, SUPREME COURT, PLACE 6 JUSTICE, SUPREME COURT, PLACE 7 º Jeff Boyd, Incumbent JUSTICE, SUPREME COURT, PLACE 8 º Phil Johnson, Incumbent º Sharon McCally JUDGE, COURT OF CRIMINAL APPEALS PLACE 3 º Barbara Walther º Bert Richardson JUDGE, COURT OF CRIMINAL APPEALS PLACE 4 º Jani Jo Wood Yeary º Kevin Patrick Davis º Richard Dean JUDGE, COURT OF CRIMINAL APPEALS PLACE 9 Newell º David“Bud” Kirkendall W.C. º STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 59 º Howard “Eddie” Ray º J.D. Sheffield, Incumbent º Danny Pelton JUSTICE, 10TH COURT OF APPEALS DISTRICT, PLACE 2 º Rex Davis, Incumbent DISTRICT JUDGE, 249TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT º Wayne Bridewell, Incumbent SOMERVELL COUNTY RACES COUNTY JUDGE º º º º º Danny Chambers Jerry Lee G. Darrell Best Mickey Garrett Dr. Mike Jones COUNTY & DISTRICT CLERK º Michelle Reynolds º Jeff Harris º Virginia Perales SOMERVELL COUNTY TREASURER º º º º Jennifer Stroud Carrie Knight-Mapes Susanne Graves April Gore Campos COMMISSIONER, PCT. 2 º John Curtis, Incumbent COMMISSIONER, PCT. 4 Daniels º MikeClark Rick º Edwin Mueck º Don Kranz º JUSTICE OF THE PEACE, PCT. 1 º Ronald (Ronnie) Webb, Incumbent º Scott A. May, Incumbent º º Vic G. Castillo Jeff Slaton JUSTICE OF THE PEACE, PCT. 2 CONSTABLE, PCT. 2, UNEXPIRED REPUBLICAN CHAIR º Deedee Jones, Incumbent V O T E M A R C H 4 On the Democratic ballot FEDERAL REPRESENTATION U.S. SENATOR º David Alameel Marie º Maxey RogersScherr Kesha º Michael “Fjet” Fjetland º Harry Kim º U.S. REPRESENTATIVE, DISTRICT 25 Gourd º Stuart Montoya Marco º STATE RACES GOVERNOR Davis º Wendy R. “Ray” Madrigal Reynaldo º LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR º Leticia Van De Putte ATTORNEY GENERAL º Sam Houston COMPTROLLER OF PUBLIC ACCOUNTS º Mike Collier COMMISSIONER OF THE GENERAL LAND OFFICE º John Cook COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE º Richard “Kinky” Friedman º Jim HoganFitzsimons III º Hugh Asa RAILROAD COMMISSIONER º Dale Henry º Steve Brown CHIEF JUSTICE, SUPREME COURT º William Moody JUSTICE, SUPREME COURT, PLACE 6 º Lawrence Edward Meyers JUSTICE, SUPREME COURT, PLACE 7 º Gina Benavides JUDGE, COURT OF CRIMINAL APPEALS, PLACE 3 º John Granberg SOMERVELL COUNTY RACES DEMOCRATIC CHAIR º Jennifer Miller
  4. 4. ELECTION GUIDE GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C4 One-term judge ready for retirement GRR Staff Report County Judge Mike Ford surprised residents in September. Currently winding down his first term at the helm of Somervell County Commissioners Court, Ford said he would not seek a second term. Ford ran unopposed on the Republican primary ballot in 2010 and narrowly defeated a challenge from Democrat Dwayne Griffin, who had defeated the incumbent, Walter Maynard, in the Democratic primary. Prior to being elected to the judge’s seat, Ford served as a commissioner. While he was aware of the woes facing the county, they seemed to grow exponentially during his service as judge. A county that was accustomed to low taxes and high revenue suddenly found itself faced with dwindling revenue and citizens who felt they had been taxed enough already, not wanting to make current payment for past budgeting mistakes. They told Ford cutting services was not an option. But neither was raising taxes. Stepping down from the helm in December, the county’s sometimes-embattled chief budget officer citied a desire to enjoy life while there is still time to do so when he announced his plans to vacate the office. Meanwhile, five candidates are vying to take the seat, offering ideas for cutting costs and tackeling budget woes head-on. Mike Ford MEET THE CANDIDATES - County Judge • Texas State Technical Institute, Waco • Control Data Institute, Dallas • Engineer Apprentice Program, Westinghouse Corp. Danny Chambers, 54 Lifelong resident FAMILY • Wife of 24 years, Darlene Chambers • Sons, Drew Chambers and Heath Chambers and wife, Chelsea • Five grandchildren EDUCATION • Glen Rose High School, Class of 1978 ADMINISTRATIVE EXPERIENCE • Business owner, 30 years I have also worked with — and for — large corporations in administrative and supervisory positions. CURRENT CAREER • Owner Chambers RV and Woody’s Supply If elected, I will hire help if necessary, so that I can dedicate my full attention to Somervell County. • Served on numerous business committees and Chapter 41 efforts through the state CURRENT MEMBERSHIPS • None. Many in the past. Jerry Lee, 60 22-year resident FAMILY • Wife of 34 years, Susan • Two children, Ryan Lee and Katy Lee Fehler EDUCATION • BBA Finance, Sam Houston State University ADMINISTRATIVE EXPERIENCE • 30 years with Texas Utilities, last 20 as director of community relations, getting communities where TU operated everything they needed • Owned and operated several local businesses CURRENT CAREER • After retirement, I owned and operated Glen Rose Wreckers. That business is now owned by my brother. • I enjoy taking care of my daughter and sonin-law’s cattle. VOLUNTEER SERVICE • None currently. Many in the past. Lee Q&A Q: What are the duties of county judge? A: To serve as financial officer of the county; misdemeanor and felony judge in juvenile matters; misdemeanor judge for adult county court; probate matters; serves as spokesperson to the media; and insure that the emergency/safety needs of this county are staffed and funded — this is and always will be a nuclear community. Q: What are the most pressing challenges currently facing Somervell County?   A: Bankruptcy/ devaluation of Comanche Peak Nuclear Plant. Q: Explain your ideas for balancing dwindling revenue while maintaining services. PREVIOUS SERVICE • None A: For 2014, our revenues equal our expenses. So, what I would do is tighten up everything I could and put money back in savings. The future is less guaranteed. I believe the value of the power plant could drop another 20 to 25 percent in addition to the 15 percent it dropped for this year. PREVIOUS APPOINTMENTS • Texas Association of Business — specializing in worker’s comp and insurance, clean air, development of water needs for the State of Texas and the “Robin Hood” school finance laws and how those districts could survive I have a very specific strategy to deal with the current and possible new owner of the power plant. That strategy has been shared in detail with Judge Mike Ford and others. These vital negotiations are taking place now and will end when it’s once again an equal effort of partners. FUTURE PLANS • I will continue to takecare of my daughter and son-inlaw’s cattle. PREVIOUS PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE • General Dynamics CURRENT MEMBERSHIPS • Glen Rose Chamber of Commerce • DDC Service Co. VOLUNTEER SERVICE • Somervell County Cancer Support Group • Walsh Construction • Bell Helicopter • Public Transit Services • Chambers Storage SERVICE AS ELECTED OFFICIAL • Glen Rose City Council, current PREVIOUS APPOINTMENTS • City of Glen Rose 4B Tax Advisory Board, 2011-13 • Somervell County Crime Stoppers board of directors, current Q: You are faced with a need to cut expenses. What adjustments do you feel could make the greatest difference (cost savings) for the county? A: Currently, 2014, the revenues equal the expenses. But, we need to prepare for the future by minimizing expenses where we can. Q: If the only option is to cut services, which are those that should first be addressed? A: The expo center would get my attention. It currently loses $1 million a year or $20,000 a week or $3,000 every single day. The expo is a valuable asset. I think it can be managed better without the need for this enormous subsidy. Q: What is your stance on economic development? How do you feel Somervell County can best attract such growth? A: Economic development can be good and bad. For those who have been here for some time, let me just say, “Doug Hutchinson!” That experience cost us millions. The good: we, as a community, found Lt. Col. Jody Butler. He had been a city manager in three small towns like Glen Rose and had a great reputation in economic development. We put him on Texas Utilities’ payroll and gave him the resources to clean up the mess and lay the groundwork to move forward. My experience is that communities are best served to concentrate on the small businesses they already have helping them to grow and create new jobs. New business that creates good jobs always helps. Chambers Q&A Q: What are the duties of county judge? A: To serve as presiding officer of commissioner’s court, judge of county court, budgeting officer of the county, work with residents and elected officials of the community to move county forward. with our revenue. Q: If elected, you would serve as the chief financial officer for Somervell County. Explain your ideas for balancing dwindling revenue while maintaining services. A: The budget will have to be examined and reviewed from A to Z and decisions made accordingly. Q: What are the most pressing challenges currently facing Somervell County?   Q: You are faced with a need to cut expenses. Considering the list of current services provided — and facilities maintained — by the county, what adjustments do you feel could make the greatest difference (cost savings) for the county? A: To bring the expenses and the budget in line A: Many things can change over the course Q: What makes you the best candidate?  nuclear safety. I understand this county and what it needs. A: 1. I’m ready right now. I understand property taxes. I understand 2. I’ve always had a “big” picture, long-term view. of one year. I’m not going to make bold statements about items which affect so many lives without all the facts and not being able to have input on decisions for the next year. Q: What is your stance on economic development? How do you feel Somervell County can best attract such growth? A: We need to use what resources and information we have to move Somervell County forward in an affordable, wise and best manner for the taxpayers of Somervell County. Q: What makes you the best candidate?  A: Listening to and working for — and with — the residents of Somervell. What is happening today, this week, and this year is important, but longterm consistent success belongs to those that plan and prepare years ahead.
  5. 5. ELECTION GUIDE GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C5 MEET THE CANDIDATES - County Judge (cont.) business operations • Owned a software development company CURRENT CAREER • Retired, occasional business operations consultant G. Darrell Best, 61 7-year resident, residing at Chalk Mountain FAMILY • Wife of 40 years, Mary • Children, oldest daughter lives in Michigan; daughter Ann lives in Glen Rose; and son, Joe, lives in Granbury and works at Comanche Peak EDUCATION • Michigan State University College of Engineering, bachelor’s degree in engineering arts, 1980 ADMINISTRATIVE EXPERIENCE • Customer service and manufacturing management, since 1976 • Sold software platforms and solutions to global companies • Boards of directors for companies like Cross Harbor Tunnel toll fast operation in Hong Kong • Patent holder in GPS technologies for PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE • Living and working in Europe and traveling extensively in Asia and Australia, selling hightech projects PREVIOUS SERVICE • First run for public office CURRENT MEMBERSHIPS • American Legion Post 462 The county judge is the presiding officer of the commissioners court and judge of the county court. • Chalk Mountain Wildlife Management Association The judge serves as the chief executive and financial officer for the county and provides the leadership and cooperation necessary to accomplish goals set by commissioners court. • Glen Rose Neo-Relix Film Festival, director 2008-present • Friends of the Brazos River • Friends of Fossil Rim • Somervell History Foundation • Glen Rose Lions Club PREVIOUS APPOINTMENTS • Somervell County Republican Club Since arriving in Somervell County: • Attends First United Methodist Church • Council of Governments Committee on Aging, 2012-13 • Glen Rose/Somervell Co. Chamber of Commerce, board member and chairman, 2008-11 • Glen Rose 4B board member and president 2009-11 • Somervell Co. Economic Development Council, co-chair, 2013-present • Friends of LBJ National Park • Texas Fire Museum VOLUNTEER SERVICE • Friends of LBJ and Texas Fire Museum • Friends of the Brazos River cleanup day, every April • Christmas in Action, in March • Somervell History Foundation Best Q&A • Save Chalk Mountain, president, 2006-08 Q: What are the duties of county judge? • Christmas in Action, fundraising chair, 2008-present A: First is the health, safety and welfare of the citizens. The judge is the spokesman, representing the county at public gatherings, in negotiations with other business and political leaders and during times of crisis or intervention. The duties include the financial well-being and stability of the county through economic development, the implementation of new or unused resources and a commitment to maintain a balanced budget. The county judge must have a wellrounded background in budget management, consensus building, vision, experience and leadership. Q: What are the most pressing challenges currently facing Somervell County?   A: We have allowed ourselves to become dependent upon one taxpayer without preparing for our future. We find ourselves illprepared to balance current requirements with available resources. We must diversify our economy to increase revenue without increasing taxes. This can be done through a carefully planned program of economic development, but the challenge is to do it in a way that does not negatively affect the environment or our way of life. Budgetary challenges will remain due to further devaluations of the nuclear plant, creating the necessity for increased efficiencies and controls. These challenges must be met with a commitment and resolve to provide essential services, such as our sheriff, fire and EMS departments and to seek better methods of providing optional services, such as the library, expo center and golf course. Q: Explain your ideas for balancing dwindling revenue while maintaining services. A: We will not be able to save our way to prosperity. There are opportunities for savings, and I will organize the county to do so. For example, the county subsidizes the expo center at almost $1 million per year. This is equivalent to buying a new ladder truck for the fire department every year. We need to change this practice. My budget recommendation would be making expenditures with the following priorities: 1) health, safety and welfare, 2) departments mandated by the state, 3) optional services. The path forward is executing upon our economic opportunities. For nearly 20 years, prime property at the industrial park has gone undeveloped, not generating property tax revenues. I will reverse the status quo at the industrial park. My plan will increase revenue, reduce the overall tax rate and control the budget while making Somervell County an attractive place to build a business, build a home and raise a family. Q: You are faced with a need to cut expenses. What adjustments do you feel could make the greatest difference (cost savings) for the county? A: With 61 percent of the budget directly attributable to wage and benefits, they will require scrutiny. Current management practices do not make the most efficient use of employees across the roads, expo center and golf course. There are specialists in every field, but we have many generalists as well, and I will propose work rule and management changes necessary to reduce our employee cost and see BEST, C16
  6. 6. ELECTION GUIDE GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C6 MEET THE CANDIDATES - County Judge (cont.) Mickey Garrett, 65 50-year resident FAMILY • Wife of 28 years, Candace • Four children My family came to this area before Somervell County was a county, settling in the Nemo area, with property that has been in our family for over 100 years. EDUCATION • Glen Rose High School graduate, 1966 • Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officer Standards and Education (TCLEOSE) Certification • Texas Municipal Judges Conferences 2012, 2013 ADMINISTRATIVE EXPERIENCE • Three-time Glen Rose mayor — worked to reach a balanced budget, strived to ensure that those funds were distributed in a fair and equitable manner and that the budget was appropriated and utilized correctly. I worked to recruit businesses for the city to help build the tax base and create jobs. CURRENT CAREER • Municipal judge, City of Glen Rose • Personal Home Remodeling Business If elected, I will be a full-time judge with no outside job interests. PREVIOUS PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE • Municipal judge, City of Glen Rose 2012, 2013 • Retired from the Somervell County Sheriff’s Office, 16 years of service • Military officer in charge of the Gettysburg office in the Avian Influenza Outbreak • President of the Glen Rose Baseball Association, 1996-98) • Glen Rose ISD Trustee Dr. Mike Jones, 57 30-year resident FAMILY • Two sons, Philip and Matt, both graduates of Glen Rose ISD and Tarleton State University. • Chamber of Commerce Executive Committee • President of the Extension Service Executive Committee • Daughter, Hope, 11 • Currently serving on the Glen Rose City Council. EDUCATION • Ranger Junior College, Tarleton State University 1974-76 CURRENT CAREER • Veterinarian, private practice in Glen Rose since 1984 • Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine, 1976-79 ADMINISTRATIVE EXPERIENCE • U.S. Army, 19791984, officer in Charge of various military veterinary posts, Ft. Lewis, Washington, U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay If elected, I will still own my business, but this is a career pause to be county judge. I will endeavor to find a young veterinarian with a family to fall in love with Glen Rose and Somervell County as much as I have to hold my place for as long as necessary. Emergencies will be taken in the evenings or on Saturdays if available PREVIOUS SERVICE AS ELECTED OFFICIAL • Three-time Glen Rose mayor 1977, 1979-80, 1981-82 PREVIOUS APPOINTMENTS • Appointed to an unexpired mayoral term, 1977 CURRENT MEMBERSHIPS • None listed VOLUNTEER SERVICE • Somervell County Museum Garrett Q&A Q: What are the duties of county judge? A: The judge presides over a five-member commissioners’ court, which has budgetary and administrative authority over county government operations. receiving and canvassing election returns. The county judge may perform marriages. A county judge has judicial responsibility for certain criminal, civil and probate matters. The county judge is also head of civil defense and disaster relief, and in counties under 225,000 population, the judge prepares the county budget along with the county auditor. Q: What are the most pressing challenges currently facing Somervell County? A:  Yearly decreasing revenue from the plant with county budget increasing yearly. Q: Explain your ideas for balancing dwindling revenue while maintaining services. The county judge handles such widely varying matters as hearings for beer and wine license applications and hearing on admittance to state hospitals. The judge is also responsible for calling elections, posting election notices and for A: As in any budget, all areas have to be looked at. Each elected official and department head will be asked to truly look at their individual budgets and work with the court to see if there is any waste or if there can be any improvements to keep my professional skills. VOLUNTEER SERVICE • None listed PREVIOUS PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE • Texas Veterinary Medical Association Board of Ethics and Grievance member Jones Q&A PREVIOUS SERVICE AS ELECTED OFFICIAL • GRISD School Trustee, 1998-2000 • Glen Rose City Council 2013-present PREVIOUS APPOINTMENTS • Golf Course creation committee, 1987 under judges Crump and McPherson • Glen Rose Economic Development Corporation (4B) 200910 • President GRBA (Baseball) 1994-96 CURRENT MEMBERSHIPS • American Legion • Chamber of Commerce • Somervell Republican Club Q: What are the duties of county judge? A: “The Texas Constitution vests broad judicial and administrative powers in the position of county judge, who presides over a five-member commissioner’s court, which has budgetary and administrative authority over county government operations.” The judge holds public hearings for licenses, juvenile courts and appellate jurisdiction from the JP courts are included. At the least, your judge needs to have a beginning background in emergency management, able respond appropriately to emergency situations. Your judge will also be the primary person many people see when they are considering moving their business to our area. As always, the most important duty of the made. That includes job positions also. Q: You are faced with a need to cut expenses. What adjustments do you feel could make the greatest difference (cost savings) for the county? A: The present commissioners court has been hard at work to address these pressing issues, but I feel that if we have a facility that is continuing to lose money and we’ve tried every option in restructuring it to bring it into a balanced budget, then we would only have two options. One, is to sell/lease it. Two, we’d have to raise taxes to maintain it. Q: What is your stance on economic development? How do you feel Somervell County can best attract such growth? A: I believe we should explore all avenues of economic development. We should demonstrate the need for certain businesses and seek them out. Somervell County should be willing to help new prospects in county judge is diligent service to citizens. Their financial trust and the promotion of the general welfare of the community should always be the principle that guides decisions. Q: What are the most pressing challenges currently facing Somervell County?   A: We have enjoyed having a wealthy county since the nuclear plant began generating 25 years ago. The success of community has been a product of the development of schools, the hospital and county amenities subsidized by revenue from the plant. There needs to be long-term solutions for the stable collection of revenue from the largest property in the county, our nuclear facility. I would recommend a legislative fix to stabilize the taxable value of the plant in direct relation to its production of energy, not necessarily an evaluation of its appraised value. Q: If elected, you would serve as the chief financial officer every way that we can… possibly offering tax breaks for the first few years. I do feel optimistic that the power plant will continue to be utilized… whether by nuclear power or by natural gas. Texas isn’t producing enough electricity at present. I don’t feel that they’ll let the plant go to waste. However, we should NOT put our financial plans in that hope! We’ve already made that mistake once. Let’s make sure we’ve learned from it. But I do think it will pick back up and add to our economic growth in the years to come. Q: What makes you the best candidate?  Working as a sheriff’s deputy, mayor and municipal judge, I’ve gained a lot of personal experience in interfacing with others on a professional level. Problem solving — I have the ability to understand the goal and what rules should be applied to solving it. for Somervell County. Explain your ideas for balancing dwindling revenue while maintaining services. A: Just like a household budget, if there’s less money coming in, something has got to give. If it means increasing the replacement intervals for vehicles and equipment, it means we drive a few more miles. As personnel retire, attrition coupled with a hiring freeze may be required. Insurance policies that have low deductibles and low co-pays can be changed, however this costs employees money. With health care in such a mess nationally, it’s still early to predict how those changes can best be achieved. I personally have a high deductible at $5,000, and my insurance is only $265 per month. If the employee wants more of their money in their pocket, a cooperative agreement between the county and the employee may be beneficial to both. see Jones, C16
  7. 7. ELECTION GUIDE GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C7 Member of county’s first family ready to retire GRR Staff Report Somervell County roots don’t run any deeper than those of Commissioner James Barnard, Pct. 4. A descendent of the area’s first family, for Barnard, service to local residents came naturally. At the end of his current term in December, Barnard will have held the office for 12 years. When he first made the announcement of his retirement, Barnard was at least a little uncertain about his departure. He said serving citizens was all he had known for sometime, but stepping down means he will have time for two things he values greatly — his land and his family. At the same time, four men with vastly different backgrounds stepped up to campaign for the office. While each might not have the roots that run all the way to Barnard’s Mill, and their ancestors might not be honored with a bronze sculpture on the courthouse square, each candidate has something in common with the incumbent — the desire to serve the citizens of Somervell County. James Barnard MEET THE CANDIDATES - Commissioner, Pct. 4 MBA, was vice president of First Financial Bank in Glen Rose and was the chief operating officer of Hamilton County Hospital. I feel certain that the business is in capable hands and will be operated just fine in my absence. Mike Daniels, 42 27-year resident FAMILY • Wife, Kim (Brown) Daniels • Daughter, Ashley Daniels, 16 EDUCATION • Glen Rose High School graduate • Tarrant County Junior College, for a short time • Continuing Education Division, Tarleton State University Basic County Corrections, completed ADMINISTRATIVE EXPERIENCE • Owned and operated business, 15 years • Co-owner/operator of Champion Auto Sales FUTURE CAREER PLANS I will remain co-owner of Champion Auto Sales. Two years ago, I was extremely blessed with a business partner who bought 50 percent of my business. He has an Rick Clark, 63 14-year resident FAMILY • Wife, Christie • Step-daughter, Shawnea • Four grandchildren • One great-grandchild EDUCATION • Business Education Degree, Troy State University • OSHA, annual training while employed with Sysco ADMINISTRATIVE EXPERIENCE • Operational Food Service, 15 years • Food service director at Jacksonville State University Fed 1,000 individuals three times daily. I was there six years, managed 43 full-time and 33 parttime employees. I was safety director for the district, which required my travel to six other accounts to conduct safety audits. CURRENT CAREER • Co-manager, Arlington Plaza PREVIOUS WORK EXPERIENCE Being self employed has given me experience in all aspects of business. I started from scratch and have personally addressed every single issue that has come my way over the last 15 years. SERVICE AS ELECTED OFFICIAL • None, but hoping this is the first. PREVIOUS APPOINTMENTS • None CURRENT MEMBERSHIPS • None VOLUNTEER SERVICE • None Daniels Q&A Q: What are the duties of county commissioner? A: To serve alongside the county judge in making county policies and administering the business of the county; Arlington Plaza is an independent living community with 79 residents, 11 full-time and eight part-time employees. We are responsible for the care of the of the residents, as well as serving them three meals per day. We oversee maintenance of the building and day-today operation. FUTURE CAREER PLANS • If elected, I will be a full-time county commissioner. PREVIOUS WORK EXPERIENCE • Sysco Food Service, account executive, 20 years I had a district of 85 healthcare communities. I had total responsibility for $18 million in annual sales. SERVICE AS ELECTED OFFICIAL • None PREVIOUS APPOINTMENTS • Vice president, Anniston Area Chamber of Commerce, 1978-79 • Board member, Lubbock State School Volunteer Council, 1995-99 Finance chair, Glen Rose United Methodist Church, 2006-09 • Finance Chair, St. Johns United Methodist Church, 1995-99 CURRENT MEMBERSHIPS • Friends of the Brazos to help prepare and approve the county’s annual budget for every department and facility; evaluate and vote on the property tax rate to fund the budget; and approve and monitor the construction and maintenance of county roads. Commissioners also determine employee pay scales, benefits and employment policies along with calling and canvassing county elections. What adjustments do you feel could make the greatest difference (cost savings) for the county? While these duties are statutory, I personally think the most important duty is to maintain an open relationship with every citizen so they can access me as a commissioner, and so I can always be in a position to offer assistance when necessary. Another focus would be to evaluate the facilities and services that are a financial burden. The county is required to provide certain services; however, other optional services would need to be evaluated to see how we could reduce costs while avoiding as much impact on our residents as possible. Q: What are the most pressing challenges currently facing Somervell County?   A: I feel that the most challenging issue is the continuing devaluation of the power plant and how those decreases in tax revenue will affect our ability to maintain the services and facilities that Somervell County residents have come to expect and enjoy. Q: You are faced with a need to cut expenses. • Economic Development Steering Committee & Council • United Methodist Church • Christmas in Action VOLUNTEER SERVICE • Christmas in Action • Glen Rose United Methodist Church Lord’s Acre • Senior High Mission Trips • Friends of the Brazos Clark Q&A Q: What are the duties of county commissioner? A: The major duties of the commissioner’s court involve overseeing the budgetary and policy making functions of county government. In many counties, commissioners have extensive responsibilities related to the building and maintenance of county roads. A commissioner must submit a budget and act upon the approved budget in a financially efficient manner to assure the best service at the least cost to the taxpayers. Q: What are the most pressing challenges currently facing Somervell County?   A: The budget is our most pressing challenge due to devaluation of the nuclear plant. A: One of the biggest adjustments would be in the purchasing of new equipment and other big ticket items. I believe each request should be thoroughly evaluated to determine need and to ensure that all other options have been considered. Q: If the only option is to cut services, which are those that should first be addressed? A: Some of the services of our county, such as the sheriff’s office and fire department are held to a higher standard, by law, due to the power plant, but I am certain that there are areas in these departments where cuts can be made without the loss of any personnel or quality of service. The expo center is a different story. I believe the facility needs to be re-evaluated and restructured immediately to reduce the almost $1 million of taxpayer funds used to subsidize it each year. If elected, I will meet with every department head and ask each budget be prepared on a “needs only” basis so the county can replenish the general fund account over the next few years. My goal would be to build up our reserve balance so the county would be financially secure for a reasonable amount of time should we find ourselves in another situation like the one we have experienced the last few months. Q: How do you feel about the current condition of roads and bridges within your precinct? A: I feel that roads and bridges within my precinct are great, and I am not aware of any areas that need to be addressed at this time. With that being said, I currently have not traveled every road in precinct 4, but I intend to do so. If there are any issues that I come across or that are brought to my attention, I will gladly address them, if elected. Q: What makes you the best candidate?  A: Having owned and operated my own business for the last 15 years has taught me a great deal about how to budget and taught me even more about how to stand firm and stick to the budget. The ability to understand what is economically profitable and logical is definitely something that has been a huge part of my business surviving the economic downfall. My ability to communicate well is definitely a strong point. I really enjoy meeting and visiting with people, which makes me very approachable for discussions on any matter ranging from finances to roads. Whether you know me well or are just meeting me for the first time, you will always know where I stand on any situation that we are discussing. I am not afraid to ask questions, and I will always do the necessary research in order to make the best decisions for the citizens of this county. I will stand firm in my decisions and not be easily influenced or swayed. We currently have a balanced budget, but with further devaluation, this challenge will remain. This creates a challenge to confront it with a solution. A: Expenses have already been cut by this court. We have a balanced budget. To speculate on further cuts at this time could only increase concern and stress. A: This is one of those questions where the “only option” is “no” option. Cut expenses? Yes. Cut services? No! Our problem is revenue. Expenses have been cut. The solution is to create more revenue through economic development that will increase our tax base and add to our overall economy. The challenge of reducing our dependency on the nuclear plant from 80 percent of our tax revenue to a manageable figure must be a priority. Challenges exist in the maintenance and operation of all countyowned facilities. These must be met with sound business and financial decisions that include the safety and well being of citizens, county employees and the general public. Since tourism is so fundamental and many attractions are either owned by or within the county, a challenge exists in helping to make this an even greater contributor to our economy. The solution is to increase efficiency and productivity across the board. These adjustments can make a greater contribution to financial stability than predicting additional cost-cutting measures. For example, a small expenditure to substantially increase revenue at an incomeproducing facility is a better solution. We must increase revenue and maintain our high level of services. The next budget will be set by the current commissioners court. That budget will remain in effect for the greater part of 2015. Our high level of services to the citizens of Somervell County must be maintained and increased when called for. Cutting expenses can help to balance the budget, but it does not resolve the problem. Increased revenue will. Many challenges exist. None are insurmountable. They must be met with resolve, commitment, determination, as well as sound financial and compassionate decisions. Q: You are faced with a need to cut expenses. What adjustments do you feel could make the greatest difference (cost savings) for the county? As a commissioner in 2015, I will address cost savings and improving efficiency in every department and present them to the court, which will contain a majority of those who set this budget. I will not speculate nor second guess this court on the job that it has done. When called upon, I will put everything on the table, based on the conditions at that time. I will judiciously address all issues in each department. Q: If the only option is to cut services, which are those that should first be addressed? Q: How do you feel about the current condition of roads and bridges within your precinct? A: I have talked to many residents of precinct 4 and have had only one concern raised about roads and bridges — on FM 199, which is a state road and not maintained by the county. Our commissioners are doing a great job maintaining county roads and bridges. In respect to FM 199, when elected, I will contact TxDOT and our state representative to see it is corrected. Q: What makes you the best candidate?  A: People skills. Over the last 40 years, I have learned to listen to people, retain what I hear, document it, research it, respond in a timely manner and follow up to assure that a situation is resolved properly and expeditiously. This see CLARK, C9
  8. 8. ELECTION GUIDE GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C8 MEET THE CANDIDATES - Commissioner, Pct. 4 (cont.) CURRENT CAREER • Teacher, Godley ISD, 15 years FUTURE CAREER PLANS • If elected, I will be a full-time commissioner PREVIOUS WORK EXPERIENCE • Education, past 19 years Edwin Mueck, 49 25-year resident FAMILY • Wife of 26 years, Sally Woodley Mueck • Daughter, Victoria Mueck EDUCATION • Tarleton State University, Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies, Suma Cum Laude • Texas State Technical Institute, diesel and heavy truck mechanics, 3.9 GPA • Graduate of C.H. Yoe High School ADMINISTRATIVE EXPERIENCE • Parts manager, Cameron Equipment Co. • Parts manager, Johnson Equipment Co. • Lead teacher, Godley ISD • Chairman of the deacons, New Prospect Baptist Church SERVICE AS ELECTED OFFICIAL • None APPOINTMENTS • Godley ISD District Improvement Committee, 2005-06 • Godley Intermediate Teacher Interview Committee, 2004-14 • Textbook adoption committees • Pastor search committees CURRENT MEMBERSHIPS • Somervell County PRCA Rodeo, 2013 Member of the Year • Texas Federation of Teachers VOLUNTEER SERVICE • Paluxy Pedal • Toy drives • Church activities • Glen Rose High School Band • Project Graduation • Relay For Life • Fundraising for scholarships • Fundraising for needy children Mueck Q&A Q: What are the duties of county commissioner? A: A commissioner’s duty is to serve the county and its citizens. We are elected officials that have the duty to represent, to the best of our ability, the citizens of the county. In serving, a commissioner promises to oversee property and how county money is spent. Decisions should be based on fact — not influence from others — and what is best for the county as a whole. A commissioner should always strive to improve the county physically and monetarily. Our county is constantly changing. As a commissioner, you need to focus on currrent and plan for the future. Q: What are the most pressing challenges currently facing Somervell County?   A: The loss of tax dollars from Comanche Peak is our biggest challenge. We have great facilities, but we lack industry. We must search out and bring in new industries to offset the loss in tax revenue. New homes and small businesses are certainly a plus and much needed in our county. However, with the magnitude of tax dollars that we are talking about losing, we must have industry to offset it. Those who were here before the power plant know what the financial situation of the county was like. Then, the power plant arrived. Industry arrived. Our county’s entire monetary standpoint changed. Millions of dollars were being handed to us. Life was good. We enjoyed low taxes and new amenities. Now, times have changed again. The days of luxury are ending. We cannot wait for industry to search us out. We must be proactive and search for industry to the county. Q: You are faced with a need to cut expenses. What adjustments do you feel could make the greatest difference (cost savings) for the county? A: I will look at all services and facilities maintained by the county. Finger pointing and statements like, “They lose more money than they do,” is not how to approach the problem. We have several different entities, but in reality, everything makes up Somervell County. We need to look for savings in all areas and not just focus on a few. All department heads will need to tighten their belts and monitor spending. All of that said, I will not focus all my attention on the bad. A commissioner should always be looking for ways to improve the county, not just maintain it. Q: If the only option is to cut services, which are those that should first be addressed? A: As an incoming commissioner, I don’t see how I could answer this question. Personally, I do not have the information I need to make such a call. I deal with numbers and facts. I have no agenda coming into this office. I am not out to cut or get rid of anything specificlly, nor am I out to save anything. The county should be run like a business — gather data first, sit down with the board to brainstorm, and come up with options. I do not know what has been discussed or tried in the past. I do know I can bring ideas to the table. Hopefully some will be new options for the county to pursue. Q: How do you feel about the current condition of roads and bridges within your precinct? A: Nothing is, or will ever be perfect. For the most part, well-traveled roads and bridges in our precinct are in fair shape. There are some places on less traveled roads that could use some attention. While out talking to people, I have come across some concerns in several areas. The biggest concern was from several residents living on old 67 between Tres Rios and FM 200. Their concern is about the speed in which people travel — a much higher speed than the clearly posted speed limit. They are very concerned about the safety of their children and potential accidents. Several residents living in the Eagles Nest development talked to me about a drainage issue. Another gentleman talked to me about loose gravel when turning from 67 onto CR 406. I told them I was in no position to make promises, but I would look into the issues to see if anything could be done. Q: What makes you the best candidate?  A: My people skills. A commissioner represents citizens within his or her precinct, as well as the entire county. Communication with other court members and citizens is key. You must be able to listen, as well as direct. You must be able to remain levelheaded. You have to be willing to listen to the bad and the good. see MUECK, C9
  9. 9. ELECTION GUIDE GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C9 MEET THE CANDIDATES - Commissioner, Pct. 4 (cont.) full-time commissioner. precincts. PREVIOUS WORK EXPERIENCE • Bell Helicopter in Hurst, leadership capacity for several years Q: What are the most pressing challenges currently facing Somervell County?   • Owned and operated Bar 7-K Ranch, in Jefferson Don Kranz , 80 6.5-year resident FAMILY • Wife of 58 years, Norma • Five children, David, a petroleum/ chemical engineer; Vickie, an x-ray technician; Tammy, a registered nurse; Teresa, an accounting assistant; and Tony, a merchandising account manager • Eight grandchildren • Three greatgrandchildren and two on the way EDUCATION • High school graduate • Chicago Technological College, tool and die and jig and fixture design • Texas State Certification School for County Commissioners, Austin • More than 80 hours of continuing education over three years, as required by Texas Association of Counties ADMINISTRATIVE EXPERIENCE • Marion County commissioner supervised road and bridge personnel, scrutinized budgets, acquired grants for special projects and worked with other officials to relocate industry to the county and make it work. • Managed three successful ranching operations CURRENT CAREER • Retired We moved to Somervell County to have the best of both worlds – to be closer to our children in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex, while still being in the country and near a small town with friendly people having community spirit. We have not been disappointed. I will be a • Managed Blue Oak Ranch, Vanderpool in the Texas Hill Country • Owned and operated a pecan ranch in San Saba, with 635 irrigated hybrid pecan trees with water rights from Colorado River SERVICE AS ELECTED OFFICIAL • Marion County Commissioner, 1993-96 APPOINTMENTS • President, Marion County Cattleman’s Assoc., 1992-96 • President, Texas Farm Bureau, Marion County, 1993-96 CURRENT MEMBERSHIPS • Grace Baptist Church, active member VOLUNTEER SERVICE • Cub Scouts, secretary and treasurer • Volunteer fireman for Gray Fire Department, Jefferson • Tri-Cities Baseball Program, head coach for 17 years with 14 years of championship teams Kranz Q&A Q: What are the duties of county commissioner? A: Working as a team with other county commissioners and county judge and setting policy to provide the best services to county residents while staying within the budget. Commissioners’ responsibilities include adopting a budget and setting a tax rate, setting compensation for county employees and determining the number of employees needed, providing health and welfare services to county citizens, monitoring and controlling jail and law enforcement facilities, applying for grants, approving and monitoring roads, authorizing contracts and aligning voting A: Lack of revenue from the re-evaluation of Comanche Peak and the struggle to maintain necessary services to the county without raising taxes; decisions concerning getting a handle on the four white elephants sucking up the tax income from the poor decisions made in the past; and bringing industry into the county – it will be hard work, but can be done as a comprehensive team effort with all other entities in the county being involved. Q: You are faced with a need to cut expenses. What adjustments do you feel could make the greatest difference (cost savings) for the county? A: Addressing the four facilities draining the county: The Promise – the county is now committed to a 10-year lease, so unless the lease is broken, the county’s hands are tied. Golf courses – I’ve been told they will be in the black next year. Time will tell. I am not sure we need two 18-hole courses. I would possibly consider selling one course for development in order to get the property back on the tax roll. A small percentage of our county residents use the facilities, but all county residents are indirectly taxed on it. Expo Center – I would closely scrutinize this facility, whether it is lack of use or poor management, new decisions need to be made in order to keep it viable. Hospital — This is the one and only facility necessary to the health and well being of all citizens. Past management decisions and over remodeling has placed it in the mix. But to insure health services to the county, it must be worked out! Q: If the only option is to cut services, which are those that should first be addressed? A: Turning one 18-hole golf course over to development in order Don Kranz, former Marion County commissioner, discusses his bid for office. MUECK Continued from C8 I have dealt with the public for more than 30 years and issues involving quality of work, cost, supply, administration, mentoring and education. Being able to communicate effectively can defuse uncomfortable situations and allow parties to work together to solve the issue at hand. I will always have a plan on how I want to approach the job. From the smallest issue to the largest, I consider time, cost and what I want the end result to be. Another attribute of mine is my organizational and planning skills. When I set out to do something, As a commissioner, I will look at what can help us now, but also where will this get us in the future. to get it back on the tax roll, bringing in monies instead of monies going out to keep it afloat. I would closely examine other options for the operation of the expo center. I would propose putting a freeze on elected officials’ salaries. I will not vote to raise taxes. Q: How do you feel about the current condition of roads and bridges within your precinct? A: Somervell County has the best roads of any county in Texas I have been in. And, as evidenced by the way they are holding up, they were put down with a solid base. I feel I am a pretty good judge, having served as county commissioner and supervised road construction. I have driven all the roads in my precinct and do not see any specific projects needed at this time. Some of these budgeted funds could be better utilized in other areas. Q: What makes you the best candidate?  A: Through experience as a county commissioner, I feel I have viable negotiating skills having worked in a partnership with all county entities to relocate International Paper to Marion County. My management skills in the operation of three types of ranching operations are also beneficial. Rick Clark, candidate for commissioner precinct 4, introduces himself to a crowd at a recent Republican forum. CLARK Continued from C7 acquired trait has helped me to effectively serve on boards and organizations that require teamwork and cooperation. Self starter. I believe in developing an idea or concept into a plan of action that, upon execution, produces the desired results. I know how to lead and/ or follow, and I believe in taking the initiative to apply my best effort in order to accomplish the intended goal.
  10. 10. ELECTION GUIDE GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C10
  11. 11. ELECTION GUIDE GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C11 Treasurer to leave behind decades-long career GRR Staff Report Somervell County Treasurer Barbara Hudson was elected in 2003. She brought more than a decade of experience to the office, having served as deputy treasurer under her predecessor, Vicki Crisp. Hudson will retire from the post after almost 25 years of serving Somervell County employees and residents, she will serve her final days in December. While her title implies one of the office’s functions, Hudson explained her daily duties are about much more than collecting money and writing receipts. She is responsible for reconciling receipts daily, making sure every penny in the county coffers and every cent owed to the entity are accounted for. The office is responsible for making sure the county is getting the most for its buck, serving as the county’s chief investment officer. While that role is not worth as much under current interest rates, understanding the ups and downs of the market has led to greater returns during less-troubled economic times. Payroll is a big expense. And dispersing paychecks and coordinating benefits for a workforce that includes 136 full-time employees is another part of Hudson’s duties. She works diligently to see the county workers are getting the best possible coverage, while taxpayers are also getting the most out of their investment. And the expense is not small. The county’s current health insurance policy is an annual investment of almost $1.2 million. Hudson said experience is something that served her well when she took the reins from Crisp, applying the skills of a banker and accountant, while taking her seat in the commissioners courtroom, delivering reports to officials charged with being the caretakers of taxpayer funds. Barbara Hudson MEET THE CANDIDATES - County Treasurer of serving Somervell County, that includes family having served on commissioners court, as city officials, in church leadership, and three generations of active service through the Somervell County Fire Department. Jennifer Stroud, 39 18-year resident FAMILY • Husband of 19 years, Blaine Stroud • Sons, Dakota, a sophomore at Glen Rose High School, and Tanner, an 8th grader at the junior high I desire to continue a long family history EDUCATION • Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies, Tarleton State University PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE • Elementary/junior high teacher since 2000 • Partner in family owned corporation CURRENT MEMBERSHIPS • Glen Rose FFA Alumni • Masters Degree in Educational Administration, Tarleton State University. • Continued education courses in accounting, economics and computer science Carrie KnightMapes, 49 Lifelong resident FAMILY • Husband, Don Mapes, former GRISD maintenance supervisor and now employed in maintenance at Tarleton State University • Father, Sid Knight, former foreman of the State Highway Department in Glen Rose • Mother, Sallie Knight, former business manager at Glen Rose ISD My parents taught me by experience about public service. • Brother, Dan Knight, Glen Rose High School Class of 1980 EDUCATION • Glen Rose High School, Class of 1982 PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE • Former business manager, Alvarado ISD • Current accounting manager, Granbury ISD CURRENT MEMBERSHIPS • First United Methodist Church of Glen Rose • Glen Rose/Somervell County Chamber of Commerce • Texas Association of School Business Officials, 21 years, Registered Texas School Business Administrator VOLUNTEER SERVICE • Took class notes for students under the Americans with Disabilities Act at Hill College • Financial volunteer for the emergency services program through Alvarado ISD, which prepared for disasters such as pandemics • Daughter, August • Grandson, Nikoli EDUCATION • Glen Rose High School graduate • 15 hours investment training Susanne Graves, 52 Raised in Somervell County, returned in 1998 FAMILY • Son, Chase • More than 100 hours of training specific to county treasurer’s office PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE • Deputy treasurer, Somervell County • Somervell County Youth Fair Association • Stonewater Church VOLUNTEER SERVICE • Children’s church at Stonewater Church • Dinosaur Valley Youth Jackpot Show • Stonewater Serves • Somervell County Youth Fair Association • Hiring committees • Concessions at school-related events • Angel Food distribution • Children’s choir director • Supportive wife, mother and Knight-Mapes Q&A Q: What are the duties of county treasurer? A: According to the Texas Association of Counties, “the county treasurer is the chief custodian of all county funds,” meaning the county treasurer is the county’s banker. The duties include receiving money collected by all county offices, depositing those receipts and posting the receipts to the proper budget codes, as well as disbursing monies and issuing all checks to pay the obligations of the county as directed commissioners and within the law. Somervell County treasurer has other duties, such as being responsible for all payroll functions and coordinating employee benefit programs. The treasurer is responsible for remitting all funds collected and due to the state, such as court fees and fees collected by various departments. Extensive and detailed record keeping and reporting are critical to the success of the office. Q: What is the most important function of the office? CURRENT MEMEBERSHIPS • County Treasurers Association of Texas VOLUNTEER SERVICE • Girl Scouts • American Cancer Society daughter-in-law of Somervell County Fire Department members Stroud Q&A Q: What are the duties of county treasurer? A: To serve as the chief custodian of county finance, receive funds for county from whatever source, keep and account for all monies in designated depository, pay and apply or disburse all monies in such a manner as commissioners court directs, receive all receipts from county officials, serve as chief liaison between county and depository banks, maintain records of all deposits and withdrawals, reconcile all bank statements and report on county finance A: Accountability. The county treasurer is the guardian of taxpayers’ money and is responsible to every taxpayer to account for their funds. It is a position which requires the office holder to understand that every decision is made to protect those funds. The treasurer must be diligent and detailoriented, with a firm conviction that there is no amount too small to be concerned. This is the people’s money, and they are electing me to safeguard it. The position is one of accountability and public service, as well as support to county employees who are on the front lines everyday, providing services to the public. Every person who contacts the office is a customer, deserving respect and assistance. Q: Do you have experience in banking, accounting or financial planning? A: I worked in banking for five years, with three years being in the accounting department. I have worked more than 17 years in governmental business management and fund accounting, working with budgets from $35-$70 million. program for county employees. Q: What do you believe is the most important function of the office? A: Proper handling and accountability of County taxpayer money. Q: What are the duties of county treasurer? Q: Do you have experience in banking, accounting or financial planning? A: Banker for county, payroll, receive and disburse all money collected or paid on behalf of Somervell County. Budget preparation and benefit A: Five years bookkeeping of controlled documents. Three years payroll, taxes, accounts payable (A/P), accounts receivable (A/R) Graves Q&A to commissioners court. Q: What do you believe is the most important function of the office? A: To be a part of a broad team that puts this county on a path to financial stability, shoring up our short-term financial issues while responsibly protecting our long-term securities. Q: Do you have experience in banking, accounting or financial planning? A: Many years running the finances for our local family-owned business. A: Tasked with raising funds for several nonprofit organizations and with the school district that I currently work for. Q: Have you ever managed investments? A: I have managed our business’s shortterm and long-term assets portfolio with a conservative mindset that continues to prove successful. Q: What are the top two skills or personal attributes that make you the best candidate? Q: What is your experience with budgeting outside of a family/household budget? A: I have a servant’s heart that works well with others. I am a patriot who cares about our community and its future. These positions required that I monitor federally funded programs and grants, where strict adherence to federal rules and guidelines carried substantial penalties for noncompliance. I was the liaison between the bank and my employer at Alvarado ISD and the education service center. I also helped with longrange planning and grant writing at both of those locations. A: I was the investment officer at Alvarado ISD and the education service center. At Alvarado ISD, I oversaw the investment of our general fund and debt service fund balances which were at times in excess of $20 million. Q: What is your experience with budgeting outside of a family/household budget? A: I have more than 14 years of budgeting experience, including working with administration and reducing budgets during economic downturns. With my vast experience in medium to large school districts, I have worked extensively within a budget environment with hundreds of budget line items and verified that money was available to approve expenses. These budgets had multiple funds, including local, state and federal – each of which had different guidelines. Q: Have you ever managed investments? and contracts for 35 employees. Nine years A/P, A/R, billing for 15,000 accounts. Three years processing daily deposit for four vending routes. Four years of bid preparation. Eleven years assisting with daily deposit of county funds. County payroll, quarterly reports, W-2s. Process checks to pay all county bills. Bank account reconciliation. Budget preparation. Q: What is your experience with budgeting outside of a family/household budget? Under the Public Funds Investment Act, a government official in charge of investments must take 10 hours of training every two years. I completed my first five hours in Oct. 2013, and plan to complete the second five hours on April 3. Q: What makes you the best candidate? A: My extensive successful experience in governmental finance and fund accounting along with my education make me the best candidate. Personally, I have a deep level of commitment to serve the taxpayers of Somervell County with honesty, integrity and complete transparency. I provide the best service possible because throughout my years in governmental business management, I never forgot the money we used came from a taxpayer’s pocket and should be guarded closely. A: Assisting county treasurer with budget preparation for 11 years. Q: Have you ever managed investments? A: Prior experience with mutual funds for personal retirement and assisting county treasurer with investment policy review. Q: What makes you the best candidate? A: Professional and positive attitude. Strong work ethic.
  12. 12. ELECTION GUIDE GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C12 MEET THE CANDIDATES - County Treasurer (cont.) EDUCATION • Glen Rose High School • Hill College • Tarleton State University April Gore Campos, 39 Lifelong resident FAMILY • Three daughters, Madeline, Mackenzie and Mia Campos PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE • Deputy clerk, Somervell County Tax Assessor • Owner and operator, Starry Skye Dance Academy and Gymnastics, eight years CURRENT MEMBERSHIPS • Stonewater of Glen Rose • Girl Scouts of America • 2014 Glen Rose High School Parent/Student Prom Committee • Glen Rose Junior High PTA VOLUNTEER SERVICE • Somervell County Cancer Support Group Campos Q&A Q: What are the duties of county treasurer? A: The county treasurer is basically the chief financial officer for the county. The treasurer receives all money from all county offices and deposits into the proper accounts. The treasurer also maintains all deposits, withdrawals and bank statements for the county. The office of the county treasurer is also responsible for payroll, new hire paper work, retirement and health insurance plans. Q: What is the most important function of the office? A: I believe the most important function of the county treasurer is to manage all money with the upmost accuracy. Q: Do you have experience in banking, accounting or financial planning? A: Yes, my current job and being a business owner have given me experience with banking, accounting and financial planning. Working as a deputy clerk in the Somervell County Tax Assessors Office, I collect cash, checks and credit card payments with every transaction that I perform. All transactions must be accurate so that the office reports will balance daily. As the owner of Starry Skye Dance Academy and Gymnastics, I had to develop a financial plan showing anticipated income and liabilities in order to obtain a business loan. Q: What is your experience with budgeting outside of a family/household budget? A: As a business owner, one of my key responsibilities is budgeting for employee payroll and other financial liabilities. This includes balancing income with outgoing obligations. Q: Have you ever managed investments? A: I have some familiarity with stocks and certificates of deposits. For any investments, I would assemble a knowledgeable team of county employees and consult with various financial professional firms. Q: What makes you the best candidate? AMANDA KIMBLE/GRR April Gore Campos, candidate for Somervell County treasurer, says her experience in the tax assessor’s office has prepared her for service. A: I believe that my professional experience of owning my own business and its financial responsibility gives me the experience to perform the duties of county treasurer. I also believe my ability to work with people, employees, customers and county officers is an important skill for resolving their concerns and needs.
  13. 13. ELECTION GUIDE GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C13 Curtis unopposed in re-election bid When and where to cast a ballot EARLY VOTING When: Feb. 18-28 Ballots may be cast 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Polls will also be open 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 22. Where: Somervell County Annex conference room, located at 206 Elm Street Requirements: Per new state laws, photo identification is required Accommodations: Curbside voting is available by calling the elections office at (254) 897-9470 from outside the county annex. An individual representing a voter may also enter the elections office and request assistance on their behalf. ELECTION DAY AMANDA KIMBLE/GRR Incumbent Commissioner John Curtis, Pct. 2, is running unopposed on the March 4 Republican primary ballot and will also not face a challenge in November. At a Feb. 6 candidate forum, Curtis said he had been serving on Somervell County Commissioners Court for “three years, one month and six days” and remains dedicated to service, spending time and effort to educate himself on every topic and issue presented to the court. When: 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Tuesday, March 4 Where: • Precinct 1 — County Annex conference room, 206 Elm Street • Precinct 2 — Somervell County Citizens Center Paluxy Room, 209 SW Barnard Street • Precinct 3 — Somervell County Expo Center, 202 Bo Gibbs Boulevard • Precinct 4 — Oakdale Park Convention Center, 1019 NE Barnard Street Sample ballots are available online at co.somervell.tx.us. Click the “Elections” link on the homepage — or go directly to co.somervell.tx.us/elections — and select the sample ballot for your precinct and party. For more information, contact Elections Administrator Cathy Thomas at 897-9470. Voting local? Vote Republican AMANDA KIMBLE news@theglenrosereporter.com The countdown is on. With early voting in the March 4 primary beginning in just days, candidates across the county and state are working to garner voter support. While a primary race typically narrows the candidate pool to one individual per party, Elections Administrator Cathy Thomas is reminding local voters only one ballot will include the names of county candidates. “If they want to vote for local candidates, they will want to vote in the Republican primary,” Thomas said. “All of our county candidates are on the Republican ballot.” Meanwhile, the race to the governor’s mansion has many Democrats intent on having a voice in helping nail down the party’s nomination in that race. And casting a ballot in the Democratic primary will disqualify voters from participating in the Republican runoff election in May if one is needed in county races. “A runoff election is likely,” Thomas said. The March 4 Republican ballot includes four races that are thick with competition — five candidates for county judge, four for commissioner precinct 4, three for county/district clerk and four for treasurer. There are five contested races that include 18 candidates vying for the offices. A runoff election is ordered when a candidate in any given office doesn’t garner an absolute majority of the votes, or “50 plus 1 percent,” Thomas explained. If a local runoff election is not necessary, Thomas said county voters who cast ballots in the Republican primary are still not allowed to weigh in on the Democratic runoff for state offices. “They cannot vote in a party’s runoff election if they voted in another party’s primary,” she explained. While there are no Democratic candidates on the county ballot, voters who wish to have a voice in the party’s nomination of U.S. Senator, governor, agriculture commissioner or other contested races, will have to decide between voting in the Republican primary for local races or in the Democratic primary for those beyond the county line. The lack of Democratic contenders also means county offices will most likely be decided no later than May, but the frontrunners are not declared the winners until after being “officially elected in November,” Somervell County Republican Party Chair Deedee Jones said. And there is still a chance the Republican nominees could see a challenge later in the year, as individuals can become write-in candidates in the general election. Jones said write-in candidates do not participate in primary elections, cannot align themselves with the Republican and Democratic parties and will only appear on the November ballot. A Declaration of Write-In Candidacy must be filed with the county between July 19-Aug. 18, and must include a filing fee or a nomination petition with a designated number of signatures. The requirements vary by office.
  14. 14. ELECTION GUIDE GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C14 Incumbent clerk prepares for December retirement GRR Staff Report The three-way race for Somervell County/District Clerk follows the retirement of another longtime incumbent. Candy Garrett was sworn into office Jan. 2003 after serving as a deputy clerk for several years. During her tenure, Garrett has seen the office move into the 21st century through the digitization of records. The process has made records easily accessible, with indices and images accessible by computer. “We are proud of our efforts in providing the most efficient and reliable access to our records,” she said, adding the digitization process started in August. Another major change during Garrett’s tenure impacts how elections are conducted. Electronic voting equipment was purchased in 2005, and elections have been tallied by computer since. As she prepares to exit the office, Garrett remains certain about its importance, saying her successor will have to be a skilled in multitasking and time management to keep afloat in the vast sea of Somervell County records. “The volume of information for which my office is responsible is tremendous,” she said. “We are experiencing continued growth in the community and have been able to accommodate this growth primarily through automation and reorganization.” In one way or another, the clerk’s office touches almost everyone who lives in Somervell County. From marriage licenses and birth and death certificates to beer and wine license and brand records, the county clerk’s office serves as a key office in the legal aspects of personal and commercial business. But the job doesn’t stop there. The office supports county courts and district courts in civil and criminal matters while assisting the attorney general with child support issues and maintaining trusts for minors. While she is ready to move into the next phase of her life, Garrett remains grateful for the years she has served. “I am honored to have been elected county and district clerk,” Garrett said, adding the next in line will undoubtedly experience changes during their term as well. “As technology continues to evolve, so will the office to better serve the citizens of Somervell County,” she said. Candy Garrett MEET THE CANDIDATES - County/District Clerk EDUCATION • Glen Rose High School graduate, Class of 2003 • Associate Degree in Liberal Arts from Hill College, 2010 Michelle Reynolds, 29 Lifelong Somervell County resident FAMILY • Husband, Clifford E. Reynolds II • Children, Camden, 14, and Kinley, 6 • Parents, Lidia and Manuel Montellano • Siblings, Gaby, Roger and Julie Montellano PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE • Hood County District Clerk’s Office, 2005-12 CURRENT MEMBERSHIPS • Active member of Stonewater Church Glen Rose Campus, serving on the welcome teams VOLUNTEER SERVICE • Healthy Woman, Lake Granbury Medical Center Reynolds Q&A Q: What are the duties of county/district clerk? A: Somervell County/ District Clerk maintains a tremendous amount of responsibility that could be very intimidating without prior experience. The office handles civil cases such as bond forfeitures, name changes, tax cases and expunctions, domestic cases such as divorces, suits affecting the parent-child relationship, enforcements and modifications of family suits and criminal cases involving class A and B misdemeanors and felony cases. The office also offers a variety of services such as marriage licenses, birth and death certificates, probate and wills. The office also maintains property records and deeds, supports commissioners court, grand jury and petit jury. In reality, this office stands as the Follow the Reporter online for Election night coverage n yourglenrosetx.com n facebook.com/ glenrosereporter Always online and on time Pick up the Thursday, March 6 print edition for election results. backbone to our county and district courts. Q: What experience do you have that you feel is relevant to the office? A: I have about seven years experience working in the Hood County District Clerk’s office as a District Clerk Deputy II. While working in this office, I have been cross-trained on all departments within the office, including front desk receptionist and criminal, civil and domestic desk support. I have the experience needed to lead this county, using my extensive training and knowledge required to maintain this office. Q: Do you have strong computer skills and/or office administration experience? A: Strong computer skills are an absolute must in this office. The everyday requirements of the clerk’s office are about 80 percent computer related. I’m knowledgeable of the software used in this office and have proper computer training on today’s technology with the help of college courses taken at Hill College. It’s very important to have a clear understanding of the amount of responsibility this office demands and how crucial it is to have experience to uphold this office. Q: Have you worked as an administrator, manager or supervisor? A: Although do not have an actual past job title of manager, having been put in past situations where I was asked to oversee the office — while my manager was unavailable — shows that I’m trustworthy and dependable. I trained new hires and assisted in ensuring that the office ran smoothly. Q: What makes you the best candidate for the office?  A: With almost seven years of experience working in the Hood County District Clerk’s office, I gained the knowledge and experience required to run our Somervell County/District Clerk’s Office. I’m bilingual and have exceptional customer service skills. I’m committed to serving our citizens with honesty, loyalty and integrity. Please allow me the opportunity to serve the county that I have called home for the last 29 years!
  15. 15. ELECTION GUIDE GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C15 MEET THE CANDIDATES - County/District Clerk (cont.) coordinator, GRISD • Principal, Glen Rose High School CURRENT MEMBERSHIPS • Texas Association of Secondary School Principals Jeff Harris, 51, Republican 17-year resident FAMILY • Wife of 32 years, Kellie VOLUNTEER SERVICE • Somervell County Youth Fair • Somervell County CrimeStoppers • Somervell County Beef Co-op • Daughter, Krista, 28 Harris Q&A • Son, Hunter, 24 Q: What are the duties of county/district clerk? EDUCATION • Bachelor of Science, Masters of Education from Tarleton State University • Principal Certification and Superintendent Certification PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE • Associate principal, Glen Rose Junior High • Project Graduation coordinator and testing A: Accurate keeping of county and district records including court records, real estate records and marriage and death records. The duties of the county/ district clerk include accurate keeping of records pertaining to county business. These include court proceedings and judgments, accounting for fines and fees, marriage license and grandchildren, who are both students at Glen Rose Elementary. EDUCATION • GED, May 1994 • Numerous hours of training, completed over the last 10 years Virginia Perales, 45 22- year resident FAMILY • Three children, AJ, Ruth and Angie • Four grandchildren, Christopher, Johnathon, Gracie and Hayden I am currently helping raise the two oldest PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE • Deputy clerk II, Office of Somervell County/ District Clerk, current • Clerk, Somervell County/District Clerk, combined 11 years experience Since 2003, I have worked all areas of the office — from open public records and vital statistics (birth, death and marriage records) to death certificates and real estate records. The clerk serves as the clerk for county and commissioner’s court, maintaining court records. Q: What experience do you have that you feel is relevant to the office? A: I have been in public education for 30 years. I spent my first years as a history teacher and coach and the last 22 years as a campus administrator. School administration requires positive people skills, as well as organizational and communication skills. The past nine years, I have been the Glen Rose ISD testing coordinator and Project Graduation coordinator in addition to my associate principal responsibilities at Glen Rose Junior High. Performing these tasks requires time management, organization and accurate record keeping skills. Maintaining accurate records and knowledge of public records and confidentiality is critical civil and criminal cases and jury trails, as well as working alongside our judges in court and interpreting in Spanish as needed in the office or court. CURRENT MEMBERSHIPS • None VOLUNTEER SERVICE • None currently Perales Q&A Q: What are the duties of county/district clerk? A: The duties of the county/district clerk include recording of property documents, filing of new civil and criminal cases, filing and recording of vital statistics (birth, death Jeff Harris, Mike Jones and Edwin Mueck line up to address constituents. to the clerk’s office. Communication and positive public relations, as in the school district office, is vital. Q: Do you have record keeping and record management experience? A: My duties as a campus administrator in public schools have required me to keep accurate records for presentation to state agencies. My duties coordinating Project Graduation required me to maintain financial records for a nonprofit corporation and file yearly reports and tax returns. As testing coordinator, I have been responsible for maintaining test security, training staff and overseeing test administrations to ensure testing was administered according to state standards. These duties, though somewhat different from the duties of the county/district clerk, are inherently similar. Both involve accurate record keeping and understanding when and how to effectively and marriage records), as well as overseeing commissioners court minutes (document, record and distribute) and assisting both county and district judges during court hearings. Q: Do you have experience within a county & district clerk’s office? A: Yes, I have worked in the Somervell County/ District Clerk’s office for the past 11 years. I began in 2003 as a clerk and have moved up to my current position, deputy clerk II. Q: Do you have strong computer skills and/or office administration experience? communicate and work positively with state agencies to clarify and resolve issues. Q: Do you have strong computer skills and/or office administration experience? A: I am skilled in all commonly used office computer skills, including email and filing systems. I have 22 years experience as an office and campus manager. These duties have involved community and public relations, scheduling, hiring and evaluating personnel and budget preparation. These skills create a positive and productive work environment. agencies have prepared me for the duties of the office. I have managed school campuses, testing for an entire school district and organized and overseen fundraising activities and planned the annual Project Graduation celebration. Q: What makes you the best candidate?  Q: Have you worked as an administrator, manager or supervisor? A: I am organized and possess professional managerial skills. I understand how to oversee the daily operations of an office and have been accountable for keeping accurate records. I do what is necessary to complete the task at hand, always in a professional manner. A: My years and experience as a campus administrator will serve me greatly in this position. The duties I have performed are closely aligned with that of the county/district clerk. Accurate record keeping, management, organization, community and public relations and working with state I possess strong people skills. I get along well with the people I work with, as well as the general public who come into my office. I treat everyone with respect and work hard to resolve concerns or issues people may have. I have a positive personality and work well with everyone. A: Yes, I have many years of experience working with computers — for the past 11 years at the county/district clerk’s office and with previous employers as well. This experience is especially important because many offices are transitioning paperwork to electronic versions. Q: Have you worked as an administrator, manager or supervisor? A: While I have not worked as an administrator, manager or supervisor, I am becoming more and more familiar with the duties of the county/ district clerk. For the past two years, I have shadowed current County/District Clerk Candace Garrett and also attended various seminars for this position. I believe all of this has prepared me to be the county/district clerk. Q: What makes you the best candidate?  A: I believe my best attributes are experience and knowledge. As previously stated, I have worked in the Somervell County/District Clerk’s office for the past 11 years, therefore I have knowledge of all policies and procedures of the office. I feel this would make for a smooth transition into the office of Somervell County/ District Clerk.
  16. 16. ELECTION GUIDE BEST Continued from C5 overtime. I will recommend a hiring freeze and only replace employees — with approval of the commissioners — if the function cannot be performed otherwise and review our current employee benefits package to ensure we are achieving the maximum benefit at the lowest cost. We will accomplish the above while recognizing that county employees not only work here, but live here and pay taxes here. As judge, I do not foresee the need for a reduction in workforce but a more Jones Continued from C6 As the city prospers from a vibrant local retail economy, some essential services (notably fire and law enforcement) may be shifted to the city. Interlocal agreements must be established to keep combined city and county resources utilized in the most efficient manner. Q: You are faced with a need to cut expenses. Considering the list of current services provided — and facilities maintained — by the county, what adjustments do you feel could make the greatest difference (cost savings) for the county? A: The county has aggressively addressed excesses in government expense this last budget efficient utilization of employees. Q: If the only option is to cut services, which are those that should first be addressed? A: I do not foresee cutting services, I foresee cutting taxes. The current budget is in balance. My plan is to expand the economic base, grow our way out of the current constraints and make us less dependent upon a single taxpayer system of funding. One area for major scrutiny is the expo. I have been told that expo season and will continue to do so. By eliminating the amphitheatre and restructuring the golf course, great strides in the correct direction have been made. The county has provided the fuel for one of our economic engines, the expo center. It has a significant impact on local businesses and hotels. Without adequate funding, Glen Rose would suffer. There are economic impact studies by the state that imply we need to keep it going. As with any organization, personnel costs are the primary expense. To reduce personnel costs, you can freeze or reduce wages and/or reduce employees — by firing or attrition. None of these options are palatable. Q: If the only option is to cut services, which are GLEN ROSE REPORTER & YOURGLENROSETX.COM | Thursday, February 13, 2014 | PAGE C16 centers do not make money. I can accept that premise. What I will not accept is paying nearly $1 million a year to do so. My goal is to manage the expo and such services with sound business practices. terms, as in the past 20 years, or we target the businesses we want and go after them. What we have been doing hasn’t been working. It’s time for a change. Q: What is your stance on economic development? I have experience with the governor’s economic development office, have brought a new business to Somervell County and taken economic development training through Texas Economic Development Council. I have also run my own business, made payroll and created jobs. A: Economic development comes in one of two ways — either you take what comes to you on their As judge, I will continue to attract businesses in order to create jobs and expand our tax base, while I will work with department heads, commissioners and citizen advisory boards to make county government more efficient so services are available, while living within our means. those that should first be addressed? Please be specific, naming the department, facility or expense directly. A: Personnel expenses are the largest. Our major departments are fire, sheriff, expo center, golf course, county offices and county maintenance (roads, etc). Each department will need to address and evaluate its minimum personnel needs for continued success. They may have to scale back. Some personnel shortages can be offset with a volunteer program, especially in the expo center and golf course. These can be compensated through a credit on property taxes to reduce the individual’s tax obligation, and provide a labor force the economic engines running in these lean times. Q: What is your stance on economic development? How do you feel Somervell County can best attract such growth? A: The county has done an incredible job of infrastructure over the last 30 years. We have the best schools, an outstanding hospital, attractive roads, top golf courses, and almost all the amenities a small town could offer new residents. Governor Perry has worked hard at recruiting businesses to Texas. We will continue to tap into those references to find the most suitable industries for our community. Development in the industrial park has come rather slowly, but my focus will be to promote industries with lowering our tax rates. I will work to get government out of the way of private enterprise in order to get businesses and jobs into our industrial park. I will also work with fouryear technical colleges, institutes and private colleges to enhance our educational opportunities in Somervell County. I will work to improve our economic circumstances while maintaining our way of life. Q: What makes you the best candidate?  A: Leadership and vision. I have managed large operations in a large retail operation, specifically designed to generate direct sales tax revenue. As our nuclear plant values continue to devalue, we will need a financial handoff of many of services to the city. Can we grow Somervell County? Yes, but it would take 300 businesses worth $1 million each to come close to replacing this year’s loss of value at the power plant. If you bring in 20 new homes a year, at only $250,000 each, that represents five $1 million businesses. I’ll take the new residents for now, grow businesses as we can and promote Glen Rose at every opportunity. Q: What makes you the best candidate?  A: As a resident and customer service and manufacturing. I have owned my own business, made payroll and budget decisions. I understand profitability, how to manage employees, work with budgets and manage competing demands. I am a consensus builder and work well with others in achieving goals. Articulating a strategic vision is the key to a successful enterprise. I have a vision for Somervell County and will be a leader that works with county employees, commissioners and other community leaders to achieve our goals. business owner for 30 years, I’ve known the growth — and the ups and downs — of our local economy. I’ve been trusted to serve on numerous boards and committees over the years, and have been involved in interlocal agreements that have benefitted the entire county. My prior service in the military gave me extensive training in personnel, emergency management and a duty to country. Most organizations have personnel issues. As a successful business operator in Glen Rose, I’ve had the pleasure of mentoring more than 60 employees in 30 years. I will continue to represent Glen Rose and Somervell County well, regardless of the outcome of the election.

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