Welcoming All Girls
Sensitivity to Family and Personal
Identities
By Tinker Bell
Making Assumptions
 How did it make you feel for other
people to tell you which group you
belonged in?
 How did it make ...
Families Come in All Shapes and
Sizes
It is important to remember that not
all girls come from families
 That live togeth...
One of the ways we can
keep girls safe is to
provide them with safe
spaces where all their
identities can be open and
vali...
Gender Expression and
Sexual Orientation
 Gender Expression – the way in which
one feels most comfortable expressing
one’...
Non-heterosexual girls face
more risks than their peers
According to a 2004 study by Boston Children’s Hospital and Brigha...
Why are these risks so high?
 Bryn Austin, ScD of Boston Children’s Hospital suggests
that girls who are not completely h...
What can you do?
 Stop any conversation that blatantly
makes a girl uncomfortable (especially
those about sexuality)
 Do...
Some girls may be assumed
“lesbians” “bisexual”
or otherwise not straight based
on their gender expression.
This can resul...
What can you do?
 Remind girls that every girl has a right to
control her own body.
 Reference other more obviously wron...
How does a space become
unsafe?
 Through Overt and Intentional actions and
words obviously intended to harm
 Through Ove...
How does this happen in
units?
 Overt and Intentional – “I don’t want
to hang out with you because you’re a
lesbian, and ...
How can we use
these same methods
of action to make
girls feel safe at
camp?
Resources
 http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1641056/posts
 http://www.childrenshospital.org/views/june04/lesbian...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Welcoming All Girls: Sensitivity to Family and Personal Identities (Camp Bonnie Brae 2006)

445 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Spiritual
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
445
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Welcoming All Girls: Sensitivity to Family and Personal Identities (Camp Bonnie Brae 2006)

  1. 1. Welcoming All Girls Sensitivity to Family and Personal Identities By Tinker Bell
  2. 2. Making Assumptions  How did it make you feel for other people to tell you which group you belonged in?  How did it make you feel when someone who’s dot was not the same tried to join your group?  How did it make you feel to not easily fit in within a group?
  3. 3. Families Come in All Shapes and Sizes It is important to remember that not all girls come from families  That live together  That have one mom and one dad  That are supportive environments  That are biologically related  That have biologically related siblings  That have/don’t have extended families
  4. 4. One of the ways we can keep girls safe is to provide them with safe spaces where all their identities can be open and validated.
  5. 5. Gender Expression and Sexual Orientation  Gender Expression – the way in which one feels most comfortable expressing one’s internal gender identity through dress, personal grooming, accessory choice, etc.  Sexual Orientation – the way in which one feels most attracted to those of the same, or a different sex. This is not to be confused with sexuality, which indicates types of sexual behavior.
  6. 6. Non-heterosexual girls face more risks than their peers According to a 2004 study by Boston Children’s Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital  40% of lesbian or bisexually identified girls are weekly smokers compared with 6% of their heterosexually identified female peers According to a 2003 study by Boston Children’s Hospital  Girls who are attracted to both sexes, but do not openly identify as bisexual or lesbian are at a largely increased risk of adopting bulimic behaviors According to a 1999 study by the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society  Lesbian or bisexually identified girls are more likely to binge drink and are 4 times more likely than their heterosexually identified peers to use injection drugs. According to a 2001 survey by Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States  44% of those unsure about their sexual orientation use no form of contraception during penile-vaginal intercourse, compared to 23% of their heterosexually identified peers.  12% of lesbian or bisexually identified girls become pregnant before the age of 19, compared to 5% of their heterosexually identified female peers According to a 2004 study by the McCreary Centre Society  43% of lesbian or bisexually identified girls suffer sexual and physical abuse, compared to 27% of their heterosexually identified female peers According to a 2003 survey by the McCreary Centre Society  38% of lesbian identified girls, and 30.4% of bisexually identified girls had attempted suicide at least once, compared with 8.2% of their heterosexually identified female peers
  7. 7. Why are these risks so high?  Bryn Austin, ScD of Boston Children’s Hospital suggests that girls who are not completely heterosexual may feel pressured to appear even more like the women in the media to make up for their “difference”  The Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society explains that non heterosexual youth are over represented in the media using drugs, drinking and smoking  Research Director of the McCreary Centre Society, Elizabeth Saewyc claims that one reason attempted- suicide figures may be so high for lesbian and bisexual girls is that they tend to be an "invisible group." The necessary resources and support are not directed at girls, thus making them inaccessible.
  8. 8. What can you do?  Stop any conversation that blatantly makes a girl uncomfortable (especially those about sexuality)  Don’t make assumptions about any girl’s sexual orientation  Feel free open about your own sexual orientation, whatever it may be
  9. 9. Some girls may be assumed “lesbians” “bisexual” or otherwise not straight based on their gender expression. This can result in teasing that makes a girl feel very uncomfortable about her body.
  10. 10. What can you do?  Remind girls that every girl has a right to control her own body.  Reference other more obviously wrong stereotypes to provide contrast. “But just because you look like a girl, does that mean you can’t really throw well?”  Suggest that girls focus on similarities between everyone in the group, rather than pointing out differences in one girl.
  11. 11. How does a space become unsafe?  Through Overt and Intentional actions and words obviously intended to harm  Through Overt and Unintentional actions and words obviously harmful, but not intended as such  Through Covert and Intentional actions and words intended to be quietly harmful to one girl, or group of girls  Through Covert and Unintentional actions and words that many don’t recognize as harmful and were not meant as such
  12. 12. How does this happen in units?  Overt and Intentional – “I don’t want to hang out with you because you’re a lesbian, and being a lesbian is gross.”  Overt and Unintentional – “Girl Scouts aren’t gay”  Covert and Intentional – “I already have a buddy, and so does she”  Covert and Unintentional – “But you don’t seem gay…”
  13. 13. How can we use these same methods of action to make girls feel safe at camp?
  14. 14. Resources  http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1641056/posts  http://www.childrenshospital.org/views/june04/lesbians.html  http://www.glma.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=Feature.showFeat  http://www.thebody.com/siecus/report/youth_issues.html  http://www.mcs.bc.ca/abstracts/rs_hazards.htm  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve

×