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Jargon busting: how your comms can make sense for those without expert knowledge - Jamie Woolley

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Presentation from ECF Europe 2019: https://europe.ecampaigningforum.com We're all experts in our different fields, although it's easy to forget that other people aren't. Whether it's talking about climate change, health policy or workers' rights, we need the right skills to decode our technical, jargon-filled language into something the rest of the world can understand. In this hands-on session, we'll look at how to spot jargon, how to find alternative ways of getting your point across, and how to make friends with your inner policy wonk.

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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Jargon busting: how your comms can make sense for those without expert knowledge - Jamie Woolley

  1. 1. Jargon busting Jamie Woolley jme.woolley@gmail.com jamiewoolley.org
  2. 2. jargon (noun) 1. the technical terminology or characteristic idiom of a special activity or group. “sports jargon” 2. obscure and often pretentious language marked by circumlocutions and long words an academic essay filled with jargon 3. a. confused unintelligible language; b. a strange, outlandish, or barbarous language or dialect; c. a hybrid language or dialect simplified in vocabulary and grammar and used for communication between peoples of different speech
  3. 3. For scientists, jargon is any word or phrase that loses or changes meaning when you use it with people who aren’t in your field (or the sciences). from American Geophysical Union https://www.agu.org/Share-and-Advocate/Share/News-media/Jargon
  4. 4. Why bust your jargon? Makes it understandable for your audience Makes it about what your audience wants to know, not what you want to say
  5. 5. Reading skills We learn 2,500-5,000 words by the time we’re six As adults, we still recognise these more easily than newer words The 1,000 most common words are used 13 times more often than the next 1,000
  6. 6. The different kinds of bits we see come from just one kind of wrapped long thing moving in different ways from Ten Hundred Words of Science https://tenhundredwordsofscience.tumblr.com/
  7. 7. The different kinds of bits we see come from just one kind of wrapped long thing moving in different ways string theory from Ten Hundred Words of Science https://tenhundredwordsofscience.tumblr.com/
  8. 8. I study what it is about human minds that allows us to speak to each other from Ten Hundred Words of Science https://tenhundredwordsofscience.tumblr.com/
  9. 9. I study what it is about human minds that allows us to speak to each other cognitive science from Ten Hundred Words of Science https://tenhundredwordsofscience.tumblr.com/
  10. 10. Tiny pieces of fire rock from inside the world can fly through the air from Ten Hundred Words of Science https://tenhundredwordsofscience.tumblr.com/
  11. 11. Tiny pieces of fire rock from inside the world can fly through the air volcanology from Ten Hundred Words of Science https://tenhundredwordsofscience.tumblr.com/
  12. 12. Even though the ground under your feet feels very still, it is actually moving really, really slowly from Ten Hundred Words of Science https://tenhundredwordsofscience.tumblr.com/
  13. 13. Even though the ground under your feet feels very still, it is actually moving really, really slowly tectonics from Ten Hundred Words of Science https://tenhundredwordsofscience.tumblr.com/
  14. 14. If you take a big thing and make it small, it does something different than what you’d expect from Ten Hundred Words of Science https://tenhundredwordsofscience.tumblr.com/
  15. 15. If you take a big thing and make it small, it does something different than what you’d expect nanotechnology from Ten Hundred Words of Science https://tenhundredwordsofscience.tumblr.com/
  16. 16. How people read online We scan rather than read We recognise the shape of familiar words
  17. 17. 1. Group words and phrases How to spot jargon from Becky Gaylord https://www.prdaily.com/4-ways-to-find-and-replace-jargon-in-your-writing/ nouns as verbs ideate, incentivise, lensing
  18. 18. 1. Group words and phrases How to spot jargon from Becky Gaylord https://www.prdaily.com/4-ways-to-find-and-replace-jargon-in-your-writing/ verbs as nouns actionable, deliverable
  19. 19. 1. Group words and phrases How to spot jargon from Becky Gaylord https://www.prdaily.com/4-ways-to-find-and-replace-jargon-in-your-writing/ work that’s not done in an office drill down, circle back, loop me in
  20. 20. 1. Group words and phrases How to spot jargon from Becky Gaylord https://www.prdaily.com/4-ways-to-find-and-replace-jargon-in-your-writing/ utter rubbish square the circle, give more than 100%
  21. 21. 1. Group words and phrases How to spot jargon from Becky Gaylord https://www.prdaily.com/4-ways-to-find-and-replace-jargon-in-your-writing/ internal language team names, campaign names
  22. 22. 2. Scan your content How to spot jargon from Becky Gaylord https://www.prdaily.com/4-ways-to-find-and-replace-jargon-in-your-writing/
  23. 23. WHO categorises the first-line, narrow spectrum drugs as ‘Access’ group antibiotics, which should be widely available, affordable and quality-assured. It advocates that 60 per cent of the global consumption of all antibiotics should come from this category. The other categories — Watch and Reserve Group — are recommended for specific, limited indications or for situations when all alternative antibiotics have failed. Any shortages or inconsistencies in the supply of first-line, narrow-spectrum ‘Access’ antibiotics can adversely affect people who otherwise go untreated or are forced to use second- or third-line ‘Watch and Reserve’ antibiotics. This is further fuelling drug resistance against them. It is a major barrier for people in the short-term, an obstacle to rational use, and, as such, an overlooked driver of antibiotic resistance. Without resolving shortages and supply instability, we cannot address AMR successfully.
  24. 24. 3. Substitute jargon for common words ideate > generate ideas incentivise > create incentives drill down > look at the detail loop me in > keep me informed How to spot jargon from Becky Gaylord https://www.prdaily.com/4-ways-to-find-and-replace-jargon-in-your-writing/
  25. 25. 3. Substitute jargon for common words ideate > generate ideas incentivise > create incentives drill down > look at the detail loop me in > keep me informed How to spot jargon from Becky Gaylord https://www.prdaily.com/4-ways-to-find-and-replace-jargon-in-your-writing/
  26. 26. 3. Substitute jargon for common words ideate > generate ideas incentivise > create incentives drill down > look at the detail loop me in > keep me informed How to spot jargon from Becky Gaylord https://www.prdaily.com/4-ways-to-find-and-replace-jargon-in-your-writing/
  27. 27. 3. Substitute jargon for common words ideate > generate ideas incentivise > create incentives drill down > look at the detail loop me in > keep me informed How to spot jargon from Becky Gaylord https://www.prdaily.com/4-ways-to-find-and-replace-jargon-in-your-writing/
  28. 28. 3. Substitute jargon for common words ideate > generate ideas incentivise > create incentives drill down > look at the detail loop me in > keep me informed How to spot jargon from Becky Gaylord https://www.prdaily.com/4-ways-to-find-and-replace-jargon-in-your-writing/
  29. 29. WHO categorises the first-line, narrow spectrum drugs as ‘Access’ group antibiotics, which should be widely available, affordable and quality-assured. It advocates that 60 per cent of the global consumption of all antibiotics should come from this category. The other categories — Watch and Reserve Group — are recommended for specific, limited indications or for situations when all alternative antibiotics have failed. Any shortages or inconsistencies in the supply of first-line, narrow-spectrum ‘Access’ antibiotics can adversely affect people who otherwise go untreated or are forced to use second- or third-line ‘Watch and Reserve’ antibiotics. This is further fuelling drug resistance against them. It is a major barrier for people in the short-term, an obstacle to rational use, and, as such, an overlooked driver of antibiotic resistance. Without resolving shortages and supply instability, we cannot address AMR successfully.
  30. 30. Other jargon to bust Acronyms & initialisms NGO, AMR, ATP, Defra exceptions including Nasa, DNA, BBC
  31. 31. Other jargon to bust Technical or scientific terms anti-microbial resistance, user experience, moratorium
  32. 32. Other jargon to bust Internal language engagement, call to action, mobilise
  33. 33. Useful tools Hemingway App WebFX Readability Tool Readable Up Goer Five Text Editor Google Trends
  34. 34. Thank you Jamie Woolley jme.woolley@gmail.com jamiewoolley.org

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