Flexible and Distributed
Learning Models
Jane Lomas
Flexible and Distributed
Learning
• Flexible Learning
– Learners learn and their own time, pace and
place.

• Distributed ...
Learning Models
• Fully Online
• No face-to-face contact

• Blended Learning
– A mixture of face-to-face and e-learning
(A...
Learning Models
• Flipped Classroom
– Students prepare for the class beforehand
– Class time dedicated to
workshop/interac...
Features of E-Learning
Environments
•
•
•
•
•
•

Ease of Use
Interactivity
Multiple Expertise
Collaborate Learning
Authent...
Ease of Use
• E-Learning Course must be well
designed:
– User-Friendly environment.
– Reduce frustration from learner.

Kh...
Ease of Use
• To achieve this:
– VLE (Moodle)
• Simple point and click interface

– Browsers/Search Engines/Hyperlinks
• U...
Interactivity
• Learner must be engaged in learning
activities.
– Activities must encourage interaction with
worthwhile ta...
Interactivity
• To achieve this:
– Communication
• Email, Forums, Chat rooms

– Resources
• Videos, Learning Objects, Quiz...
Multiple Expertise
• Use outside experts to guest lecture:
– Directly from sources
– Represented on the Internet

Khan, 20...
Multiple Expertise
• To achieve this:
– Good source of recommended reading
– Up to date links to the Web for expert
resour...
Collaborate Learning
• Allows learners to work and learn
together to accomplish goals.
– Learners develop multiple skills:...
Collaborate Learning
• To achieve this:
– Use of Collaborative Tools
• Forums, Chat rooms, Blogs
• Collaborative Tools
– e...
Authenticity
• Learners can address relevant real-life
problems and situations.
– Conferencing and collaboration
technolog...
Authenticity
• To achieve this:
– Links to current practice
– Scenarios which link to real world problems

• Learners real...
Learner-Control
• Students can determine their level of
participation:
• Facilitates learner responsibility:
– Learner can...
Assessment
• Assessment should be equivalent no
matter how they are accessed:
– Most types of assessments can be
replicate...
Assessment
• Important questions when designing
assessment:
– What is the purpose of the assessment?
– What is the quality...
Assessment
• Be valid, consistent and flexible
– Meet the learning outcomes, cater for diverse
learning styles (Cummings, ...
Tools Available
• Moodle
– Communication
• Forums, Chatrooms

– Collaboration
• Graded
Forum, Glossary, Wiki, Dialog, Surv...
References
•

Allan, B. (2007) Blended Learning: tools for teaching and training. MyiLibrary [Online]. Available at:
http:...
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Flexible and distributed learning models

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Flexible and distributed learning models

  1. 1. Flexible and Distributed Learning Models Jane Lomas
  2. 2. Flexible and Distributed Learning • Flexible Learning – Learners learn and their own time, pace and place. • Distributed Learning – Learning occurs independent of time and space • Distance Learning • Can be combination of traditional classroom with traditional distance learning Khan, 2005
  3. 3. Learning Models • Fully Online • No face-to-face contact • Blended Learning – A mixture of face-to-face and e-learning (Allan, 2007)
  4. 4. Learning Models • Flipped Classroom – Students prepare for the class beforehand – Class time dedicated to workshop/interactive activities – Increase class time for engaging instruction • It is NOT the same as homework Enfield, 2013
  5. 5. Features of E-Learning Environments • • • • • • Ease of Use Interactivity Multiple Expertise Collaborate Learning Authenticity Learner-Control Khan, 2005
  6. 6. Ease of Use • E-Learning Course must be well designed: – User-Friendly environment. – Reduce frustration from learner. Khan, 2005
  7. 7. Ease of Use • To achieve this: – VLE (Moodle) • Simple point and click interface – Browsers/Search Engines/Hyperlinks • Using current technologies learners familiar with • Technical support important Khan, 2005
  8. 8. Interactivity • Learner must be engaged in learning activities. – Activities must encourage interaction with worthwhile tasks and with others: • Interact with tutors, peers and resources Khan, 2005
  9. 9. Interactivity • To achieve this: – Communication • Email, Forums, Chat rooms – Resources • Videos, Learning Objects, Quizzes and Surveys. Khan, 2005
  10. 10. Multiple Expertise • Use outside experts to guest lecture: – Directly from sources – Represented on the Internet Khan, 2005
  11. 11. Multiple Expertise • To achieve this: – Good source of recommended reading – Up to date links to the Web for expert resources – Relationship with colleagues who can guest lecture/share their resources Khan, 2005
  12. 12. Collaborate Learning • Allows learners to work and learn together to accomplish goals. – Learners develop multiple skills: • Social, communication, critical thinking, leadership, negotiation, interpersonal and cooperative skills Khan, 2005
  13. 13. Collaborate Learning • To achieve this: – Use of Collaborative Tools • Forums, Chat rooms, Blogs • Collaborative Tools – e.g. Glossary, Wiki, Graded Forums, Big Blue Button • Google Docs or Hangout • Peer Assessment Khan, 2005
  14. 14. Authenticity • Learners can address relevant real-life problems and situations. – Conferencing and collaboration technologies Khan, 2005
  15. 15. Authenticity • To achieve this: – Links to current practice – Scenarios which link to real world problems • Learners real-life experiences can add to the authenticity of collaboration Khan, 2005
  16. 16. Learner-Control • Students can determine their level of participation: • Facilitates learner responsibility: – Learner can actively engage in discussions or observe – Learner has ownership of their own learning Khan, 2005
  17. 17. Assessment • Assessment should be equivalent no matter how they are accessed: – Most types of assessments can be replicated online or partially transformed. • Participation does not need to be identical Phillips et al., 2004
  18. 18. Assessment • Important questions when designing assessment: – What is the purpose of the assessment? – What is the quality of the assessment in terms of validity, reliability and usefulness? – How and by whom is the assessment administered? – How and by whom is the assessment marked? Cummings, 2003
  19. 19. Assessment • Be valid, consistent and flexible – Meet the learning outcomes, cater for diverse learning styles (Cummings, 2003) • Include a range of assessment tasks – Formative and Summative • Access deeper learning • Where exams are required – Utilise open-book instead of closed-book • Reduce opportunities for cheating Phillips et al., 2004
  20. 20. Tools Available • Moodle – Communication • Forums, Chatrooms – Collaboration • Graded Forum, Glossary, Wiki, Dialog, Survey, Feedback, Database, Lesson, S cheduler, Big Blue Button – Assessment • Assignment, Quizzes, Turnitin • Online Tools – Blogging, Google Docs, Google Hangouts
  21. 21. References • Allan, B. (2007) Blended Learning: tools for teaching and training. MyiLibrary [Online]. Available at: http://lib.myilibrary.com/?id=302450 (Accessed: 13 January 2014). • Cummings, R. (2003) ‘Equivalent assessment: achievable reality or pipedream’, ATN Education and Assessment Conference. Adelaide. University of South Australia. Available at: http://w3.unisa.edu.ac/evaluations/Full-papers/CummingsFull.doc (Accessed: 10 January 2014). • Enfield, J. (2013) ‘Looking at the Impact of the Flipped Classroom Model of Instruction on Undergraduate Multimedia Students at CSUN’, TechTrends: Linking Research & Practice to Improve Learning, 57, 6, p1427, EBSCO [Online]. Available at: http://ehis.ebscohost.com/eds/detail?sid=5d179d29-b139-40ca-b737ca4441158117%40sessionmgr198&vid=1&hid=106&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWRzLWxpdmU%3d#db=afh&AN=9 1587618. (Accessed: 13 January 2014). • Khan, A. (2005) Managing E-Learning Strategies. London:Information Science Publishing. • Phillips, R., Cummings, R., Lowe, K., Jonas-Dwyer, D. (2004) ‘Rethinking Flexible Learning in a Distributed Learning Environment: A University-Wide Initiative’, Educational Media International, 41, 3, p195205, EBSCO [Online]. Available at: http://ehis.ebscohost.com/eds/detail?sid=aa0b233b-0a96-4f07-91e509ef07fefb0c%40sessionmgr4001&vid=12&hid=101&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWRzLWxpdmU%3d#db=afh&AN= 13911039 (Accessed 10 January 2014).

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